#1
Do musicians ever tune down there guitar and then use a capo also? I'm talking about when recording and performing.
#3
Depends...

If you're using a lot of barre chords and you prefer a lower tuning (like I prefer D standard; some others prefer C standard), then it might be easier to use a capo.


I tend to use barre chords over capos, but I don't play a lot of songs where I use a ton of barre chords. In fact, half of my chords end up being "half-barred", meaning I don't need to barre all 6 strings.
#4
I've seen it done when playing live (makes a quicker transition then tuning back up to standard if you don't have two guitars), but it doesn't really make sense to me for recording. Just take the time to tune back up standard.

Unless you're talking about tunings like open D, Drop D etc. That can make sense because you get the options of the tuning but may need to capo to your/your vocalist's voice. (I think the Black Crowes guitarist does this alot, if I remember correctly. Tune to open D and then capo). But if you're tuning down to Eb and putting a capo on the first expressly for one song, just play in E standard, it'll sound the same.

(Note, this is all assuming you play in E standard most of the time. As crazysam said, it can make sense if you play in D or C Standard more often then you play in E standard, as you may not want to tune up to E)
Last edited by Aerynn at Apr 2, 2013,
#6
I'm sure plenty of guitarists do it to continue to play in their "comfort zone" while, quite possibly, playing in a different key and getting more low end out their "comfort zone." However, I never use capos. I've been really meaning to get around to that just to see what kind of creativity spurs from it. I've always been intrigued by the idea of using a capo on just a few strings while leaving the rest un-capo'd...seems like it would open the door for more creative thinking and less stupid-ass modes and predictable chords.
#7
Quote by Dimarzio45
I'm sure plenty of guitarists do it to continue to play in their "comfort zone" while, quite possibly, playing in a different key and getting more low end out their "comfort zone." However, I never use capos. I've been really meaning to get around to that just to see what kind of creativity spurs from it. I've always been intrigued by the idea of using a capo on just a few strings while leaving the rest un-capo'd...seems like it would open the door for more creative thinking and less stupid-ass modes and predictable chords.

Capos don't really work that way...

Quote by Aerynn
I've seen it done when playing live (makes a quicker transition then tuning back up to standard if you don't have two guitars), but it doesn't really make sense to me for recording. Just take the time to tune back up standard.

You do realize that, for the sake of your guitar's fretboard, it's NOT a good idea to switch tunings all the time? At least without adjusting the trussrod each time. Also, many new bands are on a very limited time slot in the studio; they can't afford to waste time tuning back up to E standard (and adjust the truss rod in the process).

However, before I even went to the studio, I personally would just transpose the notes rather than tune back up to E standard.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Apr 2, 2013,
#8
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Capos don't really work that way....

Oh really? well....now I don't think I'm that interested in them Really? You can't barre it across the last 3 strings, G,B,E?
#9
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Capos don't really work that way...


ummm...

OT: I've heard Satch say in an interview that he did that on a Chickenfoot song, but that's the only one that comes to my mind.
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#10
Very interesting question. I've seen a few bluegrass musicians do this. They do it because it puts less strain on their fretting hand.
#11
I've never played a gig or been on a stage with my guitar so I can only speak from jamming/praticing experience. My electric is tuned to D standard, and I do it because it allows me a wider range of music to play. With a capo I have easy access to Drop C, E standard, Eb standard and Drop C#. The music I like to play flies all over the place in terms of tuning so it works for me.

All that said, why wouldn't I take the habits I've developed over the years onto a stage?
#12
Tuning down string-looseningly low and then using a capo might get you a weird tone. Now I want to hear how that sounds...
#13
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Capos don't really work that way...

You get capo's that can be used for individual strings... 6 independent levers. Capo's work any way you want them to

http://www.spidercapo.com/

*edit* My bad... didn't see dawg had put this link here already.

I remember a few years ago there was another one of these capos. It had a round bottom and curved on the top, made out of graphite. Was gorgeous... but had a price tag attached that wasn't so pretty. Just can't remember the name... guess I'll have to go through the 90's collection of mags again... sigh
Last edited by evolucian at Apr 3, 2013,