#1
hi!
what should i practice or how to practice-to be able to play the sounds i hear in my head?

i mean,what i want to be able to do is to sing to myself " Da DA DAAA DII.." and play it on the guitar without thinking\trying to find the notes...

i know some theory and there are licks that i remember , do you know a good method to do so?


thanks!!
#2
^ try singing it and then figuring it out on your guitar. When you're really good at that start skipping the singing.

A fun way to practice this is to just play and sing in unison. Wander around the neck, singing what you play, and playing what you sing, until they become one. Worked for Joe Satriani.
#3
Learn how the different intervals sound (M3 P5 TT etc.) then when you here a melody in your head you will be able to know how to play it.
#4
Quote by amit190
hi!
what should i practice or how to practice-to be able to play the sounds i hear in my head?

i mean,what i want to be able to do is to sing to myself " Da DA DAAA DII.." and play it on the guitar without thinking\trying to find the notes...

i know some theory and there are licks that i remember , do you know a good method to do so?


Ear training. Ear training. Ear training.

Your problem is that when you hear something in your head, it's not well-defined. It's more like the idea of a pitch than an actual pitch because your brain doesn't (yet!) know how to think in pitches.

The good news is you can work on this.

Some people recommend interval training. In my experience, the functional ear trainer (a free download form miles.be) was MUCH better. The advice to try SINGING it first is also good. You may start to realize that what you hear in your head isn't as well defined as you think it is.

Practice transcribing stuff. Start with really simple melodies like nursery rhymes or christmas carols that you already know by heart. This will probably be hard at first. Keep at it.

Lastly, you could get a book on ear training, like Wyatt et al's "Ear TRaining for the Contemporary Musician."

Ear training is a journey. It's not something you develop overnight. But dedicated practice can make a HUGE difference, if you're diligent.
#5
Yeah, what these guys said is all great. It basically just boils down to playing enough and hearing enough music and being able to identify it, wether as an interval or as a shape on the guitar. If you can hear something and know it's a major 6th or minor 3rd or whatever, or if you can't but you know where it is on the guitar, that's all that really matters.

It's like with any other job or hobby you have to be able to know your materials well enough to do your job.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#6
Here are the basics to get you started man. This is the way I would approach it personally, keep in mind playing exactly what you hear is a lifelong pursuit; you can always get better at it.

1) You need to learn some basic music theory. Intervals, scales and modes, basic triad chord qualities. Learning how to read Treble and Bass Clef as well as key signatures would be immensely helpful, especially if you want to learn how to read music later.

2) You need an Ear Training regimen to be able to aurally identify and reproduce all the elements of theory discussed above. Voice matching with your guitar is a good way to get started. Intervals would be next, then scales then chords then chord progressions etc. etc.

3) Knowing the theory component will allow you to 'figure out' all of your intervals, triads, scales, arpeggios etc. in various keys all over the guitar as well as be able to aurally identify them. Now its time to learn 'shapes' for your intervals chords, arpeggios and scales on the guitar and memorize them. This will take a while, a good place to start would be your basic scales (including the pentatonic scale) all over the fingerboard. You need to get your technique and rudiments in good shape.

4) Once you have the basics figured out, you can start transcribing songs that you want to learn. Id also recommend doing some really easy stuff like twinkel twinkle little star and things like that for practice. Start easy and get some transcribing software to slowdown the song you are working down ($50 for Transcribe which is a great program). You can learn some vocabulary (licks) from whatever style you are interested in learning.
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Last edited by British_Steal at Apr 4, 2013,