#1
At the suggestion of many on MT, I downloaded the ear trainer from miles.be. It's really useful, and I have found it significantly easier to tell how the intervals in a riff or song progress. However, I have a problem with recognising the actual notes (being A-G, not the intervals). What can I do to rectify this? I find it quite hard to transcribe songs as it is. I obviously will try to get the correct notes via trial and error, but this is a thorn in my side I feel is hampering me.
Last edited by AeonOptic at Apr 5, 2013,
#2
Try this. Find a simple song, like a Nirvana song (think "Smells Like Teen Spirit" or "Come As You Are"). Slow the song down and find the notes on your guitar. Transcribe the notes that way. When you get confident with recognizing notes via this method, transcribe without an instrument.
#3
You're trying to develop absolute pitch (which is what many people call perfect pitch). This is something that you gradually get better at. There's not really anything beyond normal ear training that you can do to work on it. I mean you can do perfect pitch exercises, but honestly it's a waste of time. Just work on relative pitch and you'll get better.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#4
You will probably never develop the ability to hear absolute pitch, to just hear a note and know that it's a D, for example.

You may well develop a pitch memory, which means that your first guess as to what a note is will be close.

Ultimately, most of the time you'll have your guitar in your hands, so you can play a note, recognize it relative to the key center, and quickly find your tonic. Then your relative pitch skills will be all you need.
#5
Simplified ear training [single note]:

*Have someone play random notes for you on a live instrument [e.g piano/guitar] and try to name them one by one ala Q&A. Keep your eyes closed while listening to the pitch colors and don't strain your ear. Proceed to the next exercise once you can achieve a high degree of accuracy [e.g 95 - 100 percent]

*Don't be distracted by the apparent highness or lowness of the pitches but focus on their pitch color.

Hint: You might notice a sound quality common to all the F#'s regardless what octave you play them. e.g. F#4, F#5, F#2, F#7

Drills:
Exercise 1 - F# and Eb
Exercise 2 - F#, Eb and A
Exercise 3 - F#, Eb, A, C
Exercise 4 - F#, Eb, A, C, C#
Exercise 5 - F#, Eb, A, C, C#, E
Exercise 6 - F#, Eb, A, C, C#, E , G
Exercise 7 - F#, Eb, A, C, C#, E , G, Bb
etc...
Last edited by ha_asgag at Apr 6, 2013,
#6
Thanks for the help guys. I'll take what you said into account and work on it.

Ha_sgag: As I don't have anyone that has the time/plays piano or guitar, would an app that simulates the exercise be okay?
#7
Quote by AeonOptic
Thanks for the help guys. I'll take what you said into account and work on it.

Ha_sgag: As I don't have anyone that has the time/plays piano or guitar, would an app that simulates the exercise be okay?


Oftentimes, the vibration on a real acoustic piano or guitar really brings out the fullness of the tones. But since you mentioned that you don't have anyone to work with, I guess a MIDI app could be an alternate substitute.

Computer APPS/SOFTWARE:
===========================================================
1] You could Google "Ear Test" by BrentHugh, http://brenthugh.com/eartest/#download
===========================================================
2] "Tone Quiz" by Nathan Becker
===========================================================
3] "Functional Ear Trainer" (ver1) Alain Benbassat
http://www.miles.be/software/4-functional-ear-trainer-basic
Settings for Absolute Pitch Identification Exercises:
(single note only, not designed for chord analysis)
Cadence > no cadence
Note range: One octave unchecked
View: Note Names
[Key: Eb Major]
===========================================================

4]
Also, I've just modified the experimental app that I just posted recently and included additional options to it. You might need to Google and download this additional component for it to work on Win7 or higher:

msvbvm60.dll
Attachments:
Ear_Training_Partner.zip
Last edited by ha_asgag at Apr 9, 2013,