#1
Hey guys. So I recently changed all my tubes in my Peavey Classic 30 and noticed a nice difference in the feel and response of my amp, as well as adding a bit more "warmth" to the tone. Overall, it just sounds great listening to it in person. So, naturally, I want to record my newly tubed amp. I grab my SM57, place it slighty off center, and jam out. I turn back to my recording, and this was not the amp I was hearing. It was bland and harsh. When I kicked on my TS9, it didn't sound like what it sounded like when I was playing it a few minutes before.

My question is, why is there such a huge difference between hearing my amp in person and hearing a recording of it? Is the recording my amp's "true sound"?
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#2
Mic placement will make the biggest difference in your recorded tone vs what you hear. Play around with a bunch of different spots on the speaker.

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#3
Operator error.
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#5
You've got to mess around with the mic placement. There is no specific rule, just what sounds best. The best way to figure out the "sweet spot" is to play something while somebody else moves the mic around while you listen to it over the monitor. Once you find "that spot", leave the mic along and mark off the spot with some colored tape or something.

A good place to start would be to have the mic off axis to the cone and about 3-6 inches away from the cab. Generally the farther away the mic, the "bigger" the sound (to an extent).
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#6
Quote by stonyman65
You've got to mess around with the mic placement. There is no specific rule, just what sounds best. The best way to figure out the "sweet spot" is to play something while somebody else moves the mic around while you listen to it over the monitor. Once you find "that spot", leave the mic along and mark off the spot with some colored tape or something.

A good place to start would be to have the mic off axis to the cone and about 3-6 inches away from the cab. Generally the farther away the mic, the "bigger" the sound (to an extent).


Yea that was the problem. Live, in front of the amp, the sound was big and open, but in the recording it was dull and squished. I figured it was most probably user error as well with the mic placement and stuff. I'll try out different mic placements. And in order to mark it, would putting tape on the grill affect the sound or grill appearance in any way?

Another question just popped into my head. Sometimes, when I crank my amp, if I start playing high notes like on the 1st string 7th fret +, my amp has this really high frequency note that just bugs the heck out of me. It's like it just digs into my ears. What can I do to fix that? So far, I've turned my treble down, which sort of relieves the problem, but not completely. On top of that, my amp's lost some band cutting definition.
Current/Main Gear
'06 MIA Fender Stratocaster
'97 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Lim. Ed.
'90s Peavey Classic 30
H&K Tubemeister 18
MXR 404 CAE Crybaby
Ibanez TS9
Ernie Ball Jr. Volume
Digitech Hardwire DL-8
TC Electronic Nova Repeater
#7
Sounds like some harsh high frequencies or fizz, an eq pedal helps. Short of that there's not that much you can do about it. Almost all amps have fizz to a certain degree.

In terms of cutting through, more mids and/or an TS based boost pedal will do the trick.
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#8
Welcome to recording. Use less gain and try again.

This is an excellent video for hearing different mic angles and placements. I know it says it's for metal, but it applies to all guitar sounds:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyDnoHSFsnc
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#9
Also remember that an SM57 will accentuate certain frequencies. Thats why we have arule over in the recording forum (which is where this thread should be) that you can't recommend it simply because its the 'industry standard' (another banned phrase).

To record the true sound of your amp, an LDC will probably work better, although placement and the room you're in will have an effect.
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