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#41
Quote by mdc
Yeah man. The version you're describing reminds me of the first time I heard it on Room For Squares.

From what I remember, the sweep is an awkward one, cuz it's not like your typical C shape. It requires good rolling motion, as it's all same fret nonsense.

But yeah, like you were saying, it appears from nowhere while you're doing all the fingerpicking.

Ahem, yes sorry, Room for Squares, not Continuum. I knew that... honest. Aaaanywho, I'll let everyone get back to the actual discussion now.

Quote by rabbittroopsux
shoooooooot; you better be good, because any time i read a technique thread, ive pretty much skipped through to see what you said, or freepower, or a couple other names. but ive generally considered a question answered when i see a post by you or freepower


Heh, I think a lot of us regulars think the same.
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Apr 11, 2013,
#42
Quote by NickVarney90
I can play a few Muse songs (Hysteria, Panic Station, Time Is Running Out) but I suppose what I meant was more his accuracy and precision rather than just his style. I'm currently practicing songs where I need to go from a chord at the low end and going into a solo and landing on the right fret.


I did a cover of MK Ultra on my Youtube channel GuitarGuyGijs in which I have to switch from the 5th fret to 13th fret when the verse goes into the chorus at 0:48 seconds.

Just before I switch to the chorus I turn my head and look at that 13th fret. That's the key to hitting the right fret in big position shifts. Look at your target note just before hitting it. And ofcourse start out slower when you first begin practicing it.

(Click in the link in my signature to go to my channel)
Last edited by gijsheijnen84 at Apr 11, 2013,
#43
Hopefully I never see myself as a "good" guitarist. I guess I've got more skill than the average chump but I can't see myself being satisfied with myself as "good" anytime soon. And I've been playing for six and a half years now.
#44
Quote by rabbittroopsux
shoooooooot; you better be good, because any time i read a technique thread, ive pretty much skipped through to see what you said, or freepower, or a couple other names. but ive generally considered a question answered when i see a post by you or freepower


Eh, it's not hard to find some of my playing but I don't think there's been anything new put out for a while apart from one live video where I'm way too low in the mix anyway

By the end of the year there should be an album though!
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#45
When I started, I would have probably considered where I am to be "good". Now, however, there are so many ways I know I want to improve. I kinda think if you think yourself to be finished and nothing more to learn, you're doing something wrong.
__________________
#46
Quote by gijsheijnen84
I did a cover of MK Ultra on my Youtube channel GuitarGuyGijs in which I have to switch from the 5th fret to 13th fret when the verse goes into the chorus at 0:48 seconds.

Just before I switch to the chorus I turn my head and look at that 13th fret. That's the key to hitting the right fret in big position shifts. Look at your target note just before hitting it. And ofcourse start out slower when you first begin practicing it.

(Click in the link in my signature to go to my channel)

#47
My 7th or 8th year outta 15, I became profecient in shred technique. I had been playing a blues-rock style, but when I got really good at palm muting chords and inversions of chords on the higher strings, sweeping is still the only aspect I have yet to master, but I am 32 and my favorite bands do NOT sweep, so, I am quite happy w/my guitar skills. Now, I am working on playing technical passages and difficult chordal progressions while singing. There is always attributes to master all thru your career.
<Insert Witty Comment Here>

1981 Fender Lead I Seymour Duncan humbucker, Mesa BoogieIIIRectifer, MKIIRhodes,PRS
#48
I have been playing seriously since about 7th grade around the age of 12 and I am 20 years old now studying at a conservatory. At this point in my playing career I would confidently say I would be able to hang in most professional playing situations. It is more a matter of the amount of consistent practice and work you put in, as well constantly being inspired (either by discovering new music or seeing shows/concerts)

Here's a recent video I did of my playing so you can see where I am at. Let me know what you think!

[forbidden link]
Last edited by AndrewLeCoche at Apr 13, 2013,
#49
Quote by AndrewLeCoche
I have been playing seriously since about 7th grade around the age of 12 and I am 20 years old now studying at a conservatory.

^ Same with me.
Except the more I study at a conservatory, the more I feel that I'm lacking in ability and knowledge. It's really just the beginning.
But I really agree with about the inspiration part, I got introduced to so much music during my first two years.
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at Apr 14, 2013,
#50
Quote by GoldenGuitar
^ Same with me.
Except the more I study at a conservatory, the more I feel that I'm lacking in ability and knowledge. It's really just the beginning.
But I really agree with about the inspiration part, I got introduced to so much music during my first two years.


That's one of the things that I think a music education could give me, which is an introduction to very different kinds of music and a way to look at it differently.
#51
So do most people think around 3-5 years of serious playing? I'm approaching 2 years of playing and while i'm decent and can impress some people i'm not nearly as good as I want to be and it's frustrating, but I know it takes time.
#52
Quote by Chorstman
So do most people think around 3-5 years of serious playing? I'm approaching 2 years of playing and while i'm decent and can impress some people i'm not nearly as good as I want to be and it's frustrating, but I know it takes time.


If there is anything you should take away from this thread is is that people are never as good as they want to be.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#53
Quote by Chorstman
So do most people think around 3-5 years of serious playing? I'm approaching 2 years of playing and while i'm decent and can impress some people i'm not nearly as good as I want to be and it's frustrating, but I know it takes time.


To build confidence I think there is minimum of 5 years of serious practicing required. I play for 20 years but only the last 5 were really important.
[forbidden link]
#55
Quote by Chorstman
Hey Everyone,

I know this changes from person to person and everyone will have a different answer, but i'm just curious how long it took you guys to get "good" while taking guitar seriously. I understand being good is subjective to what the individual player believes is good. I know this will also depend on what style of music you mainly play (jazz, metal, classical, etc.) so maybe include your main style too? I'm just curious how long it took most people on average.

Also please excuse if this is in the wrong thread.

Unfortunately I never got good. I haven't dedicated enough time to guitar and keep trying to pick it back up to no avail. Piano seems to be more up my alley, as it really came naturally to me. Once you have a good grasp on the basic theory of music, scales and what not and learn how to find them on the guitar it gets a lot easier, but to be a more advanced player I think it takes some real dedication and lots of practice more than anything. The Guitar Smith game where you literally hook a guitar up to the console can be really useful for learning new techniques and songs, but again I never quite got it down.
#56
Not till my early 20s...I started when I was 13, learned enough to play in the High School Jazz band. I was a hot head though about it, I thought I was the shit when I wasnt, learned alot of Metallica(which at the age of 35 I barely remember these days). I was broke, Poor and Married at the age of 19 and all I had was an Acoustic Guitar so I was forced to learn more and play properly so it would actually sound decent to my ears and others. Although I don't consider myself a Guitar God, I do consider myself pretty good. I'm not a shred type guy but I know my way around the Guitar, Leads, I only practice what I'll actually use, and I am far from the best!
#57
i have been playing a year and i am no were close to what i want to achieve with my playing abilities.
#58
I have been playing for 17 years and I still think I suck (LOL). I have days where I will record what I'm playing and go "wow I have come far" and then I have days where I think it sounds like my dog is humping my axe
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#59
I've played guitar for nearly 6 years now and pretty much entirely metal other than the few times every now and again where I say "hey, I'm gonna get into some jazz playing". I don't listen to Jazz but it's always nice to learn new styles

Anyway, I was good enough to be accepted into collage on a level 2 (out of 3) music course after playing for 6 months with no previous experience with any other instrument. I wouldn't say I was what I would say is 'good' or 'average' until about a year though which is when I thought I could at least hold my own as a rhythm player.

I would say between 2 and 3 years is when I would say I got to the point where I was above that and saw myself as a great lead player aswell and with it came a ton of confidence to advertise myself at that level aswell.

I've never gone further than saying I'm very good though. I know that I will always be improving. I still remember some of my goals with guitar from years ago and how small and insignificant they seem in comparison to what I consider goals today.

I'm sure that if I see this same question in a few more years my answer will change. Maybe I will say "I've played for 12 years but only considered myself good after 7". It's just really hard to define 'good' and as people grow and change, so do their opinions.

One thing I can say for sure, me from 6 years ago would never imagine I would be able to play Megadeth, Children of Bodom or Arch Enemy songs at any point ever. It seemed out of reach and impossible for just 'some kid' to be able to do that. It's a nice thought that I achieved that though
When I was eleven I broke the patio window and my mother sued me... She's always been a very aggressive litigator.
Last edited by link no1 at May 6, 2013,
#60
Freshman in college. I'd been trying to learn what other people played on records, pretty much straight up hard rock. Played in a high school band but played everything straight. Then in college there was all this other music people were into, and all these influences got me playing ways I hadn't before. It was like the blinders came off and there were unlimited possibilities.
#61
Been playing for five and a half years. Been playing live for four of those years. Already done an A Level Music Performance course and been playing in a jam session live for about two or three years. I want to be able to play Appetite for Destruction (Izzy's part) all the way through and be able to play my favourite Led Zeppelin songs. Plus I'd like to have a really good ear. Finally got a serious band going so hopefully I'll improve massively from now on. I know it's not gunna happen over night but I'm happy working at it.
#63
I've been playing for 5 years and I began to feel confident in my skills at the 3.5 year mark. I still have a lot to learn, but I can hold my own and (most) jams.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#65
I actually love this thread also... it keeps me motivated lol. It looks like the noob struggle is definitely real folks... I'm 1 year and 3 months in and sometimes I forget that and expect myself to be dope as hell already.
I see myself in the same places as most of you were when you began, learning/hearing new music and shit. It's cool. Never thought I'd be into bands like Periphery for example, but here I am trying to play everything they have lol.
^ EDIT: I'm struggling my heart out learning Luck As a Constant. ^

I'm enjoying this stuff so far... I put in hours of practice a day. I don't even count but I start in the morning and end at night if I'm not doing anything that day. (w/ breaks).
I hope to one day shred like a gawd, amen.
Last edited by J2G at May 21, 2013,
#66
Same here. I gotta admit that knowing that everyone will be heavily frustrated from time to time kinda puts me at ease, as in "oh thank god I'm not the only one"..
baab
#67
I first thought I was good about 8 months into my playing, when I played The Trooper in a secondary school concert, however, I've always felt I could be better, and that's what's pushed me along. That was about 4 years ago, so I've come along so much since then, and if I was to actually say a moment that made me realise how well I've done with my playing, where I've become good by my standards now, it was a few months ago, when my old guitar teacher, the guy who taught me how to play guitar from day one, saw a video of me playing a guitar solo, and told me I did it better than he could have. For me, getting a compliment like that from a guitarist I owe my skill to was unbelievable.

I'm a Power Metal guitarist, so, technique is crucial for me, and even though I do consider myself a very skilled guitarist, it's amazing exploring what's next, what can be more technical, more complicated, how fast it can all be, that'll always be there. No matter how good you get, you can always be better, I think the key isn't saying "Oh god, I'm crap" when you can't do this or that, it's seeing what you can't do and having the determination to one day do it. Putting yourself down gets you nowhere, neither does thinking you're an unstoppable amazing guitarist, you need that middle ground.
#68
I became good when I did these things:

1. stopped pretending I learn all on my own

2. observing other players and asking myself 'what do they know that I don't?'

3. practicing off books , a little bit every day, with focus. In other words, learning some
discipline. It doesn't have to be a pain, but if there's no pain at all, well, guess what.

4. listening to a wide range of music (if you only listen to 3 bands and 3 guitar players and 1 genre, oh my, that's really bad. It doesn't seems like it is, but it is.)

5. realizing that I needed to learn not only about technique, but about ear training, chords, etc. Focusing only on a solo isn't a good idea. The paradox is that this will fit in naturally once you build a wider range of musical skills.

6. One of the absolute best things I have done, was learning to read music. Even reading tabs with the value of the notes, will put you way ahead of the pack. Too many reasons to mention why, really. This will put you at another level right off the bat. I was lucky to have learned pretty much as soon as I started playing guitar. It took a little while, but I can't believe what it did for me.
Last edited by harmony_melody_ at May 22, 2013,
#69
From the moment the magnetic field of the pick-ups grazed my finger tip for the first time!

But seriously, I would say 'confident' is a better word for what you're asking, 'good' is too subjective. I've played 10 years but only in a band the last year. I'm a confident rhythm player in front of an audience and a slightly nervous lead player.
#70
I thought this would be a nice addition to this thread, so I asked Misha mansoor the following on his formspring:
"Hey misha, I myself as a guitar player was wondering - you being a pro and all - do you still get frustrated when practicing?

Misha

Yes, all the time. I kinda hate where I am at as a guitarist, sometimes I get very discouraged. I'd like to believe that is somewhat normal..."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9shf5BLc40

He kinda hates where he is at as a guitarist - there you have it folks.


also instrumental periphery > vocal periphery
baab
#73
Quote by My Last Words
I thought this would be a nice addition to this thread, so I asked Misha mansoor the following on his formspring:
"Hey misha, I myself as a guitar player was wondering - you being a pro and all - do you still get frustrated when practicing?

Misha

Yes, all the time. I kinda hate where I am at as a guitarist, sometimes I get very discouraged. I'd like to believe that is somewhat normal..."

He kinda hates where he is at as a guitarist - there you have it folks.


also instrumental periphery > vocal periphery


there's a real heckuvalot of cancer in this post for somebody who probably just heard the first album and still thinks misha's the center of the world
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#74
Quote by Hail
there's a real heckuvalot of cancer in this post for somebody who probably just heard the first album and still thinks misha's the center of the world


Are you implying that I think he's the center of the world? Because, in my opinion, he's far from that. However, I still regard him as a professional musician and therefore I said he was a pro.


offtopic: checked out your profile a bit, glad to see that you like immortal technique! Man's a lyrical genius
baab
#75
Since I started listening to buckethead my playing has improved dramatically. I think I have learned more in the last year than I had in the 7 years I was playing before that.
#76
Quote by My Last Words
I thought this would be a nice addition to this thread, so I asked Misha mansoor the following on his formspring:
"Hey misha, I myself as a guitar player was wondering - you being a pro and all - do you still get frustrated when practicing?

Misha

Yes, all the time. I kinda hate where I am at as a guitarist, sometimes I get very discouraged. I'd like to believe that is somewhat normal..."

also instrumental periphery > vocal periphery


THis is very enlightening.
#77
I got comfortable enough to jam with people I knew well about 18 months in. Weirdly enough that was easier than reciting a piece, which I got about 2 years in. Took me another 18 months or so before I went anywhere near jamming with strangers, and I got hooked on that. Still to recite anything in front of strangers.

As far as writing, I'm still terrified of showing anybody I know my tunes. I dunno, I'm fine with screwing up some if I'm improvising it, but if I supposedly wrote it I'd surely have the time to learn the damned thing, right?
#78
If I listen to the opinions/comments from others, I've been pretty damned great since I was about 17...if I go by how I feel about my playing, I'm still trying to acheive greatness at 49! I started playing in public places when I was 15, cruising around town with my Marlboro Strat copy and a Lectrosonic Mouse battery powered amp...I'd go under the High Speedline tracks in Collingswood NJ and play Hendrix and Who riffs till my hands hurt, at full volume, just to hear the natural reverb from the concrete walls and overhead tracks...it was great! Joined my first band (Ellipsis) when I was 17, and have never looked back since! Being good/great isn't about your technical proficiency, it's about making music that makes you feel good...in that vein, I've been "good" since the moment I picked up my dad's Kay jumbo acoustic at 10 years old, in 1974!
Last edited by aging_metal_god at May 28, 2013,
#79
Quote by aging_metal_god
If I listen to the opinions/comments from others, I've been pretty damned great since I was about 17...if I go by how I feel about my playing, I'm still trying to acheive greatness at 49!


I know what you mean.
#80
That's a good question. Taking a step back and analyzing one's achievements, skills, and progression through the years can help you grow and expand so much later on. I have been playing for 5 years (wow, seems longer). I have been playing in a trio for the past year and we've been doing quite well. I also sing in the band. I would say on a completely honest bet, that I'm decent. Not good yet. I still feel I'm lacking with soloing, my listening-then-playing skills need more fine tuning, and my familiarity with the board is really just that. But I know I'm getting there. I feel that after the 4th year, you really start to understand what you're doing, and it's all smoothing out the kinks from there. Give me another few years, and I'll write back