Patsfan1281
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2012
956 IQ
#1
Can anyone give some tips on how to compose music. Any advice on composing solos, rhythm playing, and rifts. I can play other people's stuff that are already pre-written, but when it come to making up my own stuff it does not fair out too well. As far as generes I like, I prefer blues(both acoustic and electric), rock, and some metal
supersac
Tab Contributor
Join date: Aug 2009
630 IQ
#2
listen to alot of music and work on your ear

also lots of practice just write something every day even if its not good or you foret it youll get better at it as you go along

also having a bit of knowhow on music like at least knowing chords and the major minor pentatonic scales will help immensly
Last edited by supersac at Apr 7, 2013,
Wicer
Another Guitar Player...
Join date: Oct 2011
445 IQ
#3
Start with chord songs, and slowly build from there. Learning common chord progressions helps as well, even if your song is a "4 chord song", (C G Am F), you have to start somewhere. Many big hits are 4 chords songs anyways.

When coming up with simple riffs, play around in the minor pentatonic scale until you find something you like and then find the key you like it to be in.

As for advancing from there.. I dunno because I haven't yet.
MaggaraMarine
Slapping the bass.
Join date: Oct 2009
3,411 IQ
#4
I think just noodling around with a scale isn't a good way to write riffs. You aren't thinking in music and your fingers do the job. Composing should happen in your head, not in your fingers. If you have a good ear, that's a good thing and makes composing much easier. If you hear something in your head, you can instantly play it.

Yeah, it's good to learn how different kind of chord progressions sound like.

Think in sound when you compose because the song will be sound, not fingerings on your fretboard.

And if you want to compose a rock song, listen to rock songs and analyze what's happening (structure, chords, rhythms, melodies).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Charvel So Cal
Ibanez Blazer
Yamaha FG720S-12
Tokai TB48
Laney VC30
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Apr 8, 2013,
Sean0913
Music Theory Life-Hacker
Join date: Dec 2009
813 IQ
#5
Write a melody.

Determine a key centre

Find an appropriate rhythm that compliments your ideas, and the theme.

Harmonize the melody with chords.

Finally solo following a chord tone soloing strategy, as appropriate. This means decide where the chords seem to fall best. They don't have to change every note.

Mix it up by using occasional out of key ideas and accidentals.

Best,

Sean
slap-a-bass
Slapper of the bass
Join date: Oct 2007
1,032 IQ
#6
Quote by Sean0913
Write a melody.

Determine a key centre

Find an appropriate rhythm that compliments your ideas, and the theme.

Harmonize the melody with chords.

Finally solo following a chord tone soloing strategy, as appropriate. This means decide where the chords seem to fall best. They don't have to change every note.

Mix it up by using occasional out of key ideas and accidentals.

Best,

Sean


i concur but i would do it a little bit different since my music is very rhythm based

create a rhythm, using notes of course (fiddle around with scales or any patterns use your eyes and ears for this part) now determine your key what notes you can use, use those as your base and feel around for other notes that might not particularly fit but could in context

Find an appropriate melody that compliments your ideas, and the rhythm (However with instrumental music, i prefer contrasting rhythms between melody and the original riff, all personal preference). Harmonize in certain areas


If youre music calls for soloing find the appropriate spot, you definitely should give it a go but dont ask me lol


so find what works best for you and if its not what you want it to be, nothings set in stone back to the drawing boards. See my newest uploads on my page for a mood placer if you will >.>

good luck!
Last edited by slap-a-bass at Apr 9, 2013,