#1
So a little while back I got this guitar. It's a Melody Blue Sage (Classical not the electric). I've been trying to find out if it's rare or common and what's its worth. What tips me into believing it's rare is the fact that it's a solid body Classical, it looks well made and the tuning pegs just look exquisite. And also the guitar may have been made in Italy.
Google hasn't been of any real help. Any information is appreciated
Here are some pics:



Really the pics don't do it justice. Thanks
#3
Clueless. Hm, "bumped", rhymes with "stumped". That has the makings of a good country song.
#4
if it had any strings, he could start writing it..... sigh.
i dont have a clue as to its origins or value.
as far as i can tell, they were a cheap knockoff cowboy guitar from the late '30's and early 40's. they also had a "melody Ranch Gene autrey" model with stickers all over it.
Last edited by stepchildusmc at Apr 10, 2013,
#5
Quote by stepchildusmc
if it had any strings, he could start writing it..... sigh.
i dont have a clue as to its origins or value.

The photo is older. The guitar has strings now and is in working condition.
Quote by stepchildusmc
i dont have a clue as to its origins or value.
as far as i can tell, they were a cheap knockoff cowboy guitar from the late '30's and early 40's. they also had a "melody Ranch Gene autrey" model with stickers all over it.

I don't think it's the same company. This guitar is supposed to be made in Italy.
Here's what I managed to find about this Melody Guitars:
http://www.fetishguitars.com/portfolio/the-elusive-melody-co-intr/
Hope it's the same one.
Also something that may not be visible in the photos: the guitar is very slim (slim like an electric).
Anyone else's opinion?
Last edited by BlacKobalt at Apr 11, 2013,
#7
Quote by Captaincranky
You might try rooting through this site: http://www.jedistar.com/

I've looked through the website and found Melody Guitars but points to the same website I listed above. Anyone else?
#8
Probably not worth that much because it's a cut-away and the body is too skinny to resonate as well as a classical guitarist would want it to. Brand name classical guitars don't fetch much regardless of age because they aren't considered to be as refined as luthier-made instruments and this was definitely made with the contemporary finger-picker in mind.

EDIT: Also, the rosewood fingerboard screams cheap. High level classical guitars come with ebony fingerboards.
Last edited by XianXiuHong at Apr 12, 2013,
#9
Quote by XianXiuHong
Probably not worth that much because it's a cut-away and the body is too skinny to resonate as well as a classical guitarist would want it to. Brand name classical guitars don't fetch much regardless of age because they aren't considered to be as refined as luthier-made instruments and this was definitely made with the contemporary finger-picker in mind.

EDIT: Also, the rosewood fingerboard screams cheap. High level classical guitars come with ebony fingerboards.


I don't know about the cutaway and company but when it comes to resonance...It's supposed to be plugged in (it's a solid body, the sound hole is fake).
As for the fingerboard...you may be right. The most expensive classical guitars use exotic woods, but there are a lot of very good guitars (pricey too) that use rosewood.
Any more information/opinions?
#10
Quote by BlacKobalt
I don't know about the cutaway and company but when it comes to resonance...It's supposed to be plugged in (it's a solid body, the sound hole is fake).
As for the fingerboard...you may be right. The most expensive classical guitars use exotic woods, but there are a lot of very good guitars (pricey too) that use rosewood.
Any more information/opinions?



I know it's supposed to be plugged in which is why it's probably not worth much. The resonance contributes siginificantly to a guitar's tone because the more a guitar resonates, the more overtones that appear in the sound, giving the impression of a fuller, bigger sound. A guitar that doesn't resonate that well just sounds percussive and when you are playing a nylon string guitar, you may as well be playing a flamenco guitar if it's that percussive. Solid body guitars simply don't resonate as well as a well made classical guitar because much more energy is needed to actually make the body vibrate at all and in the right places too so even if you can achieve any volume you want with amplification, the sound is just going to be dull and crappy.

You seem to really want to believe that this instrument is worth something. Did you come here looking for information or just validation? The most expensive guitars don't use 'exotic' woods (at least not in the sense that you're describing...), the tops are always some sort of cedar or spruce and the back/sides are usually some sort of rosewood. The necks are probably the most varied piece on the instrument but again, they aren't 'exotic' in any manner. I can't actually think of any good classical guitars that deviate from this kind of setup.

Think about it. Your guitar's supposed to be a classical guitar and it has...

A solid body - no good for tone or resonance (refer to first paragraph as to why amplification doesn't really help)
A cut away - what serious classical guitarist would play with a cut-away?
Electronics - If the instrument were that good, there would be no electronics. If the factory thought they were producing a concert instrument (which they weren't, no concert guitarist would buy this if only for shits and giggles) they wouldn't have added in electronics because mics are better for amplifying good classical guitars.
Rosewood fingerboard - Yes, some 'good' classical guitars use rosewood fingerboards but they are in a very very small minority. Considering the above points, I don't think this is one of those exceptions.

Last of all, it was factory made, which is enough said about the quality of the guitar itself. Something like this would have been made with the amateur/hobby player in mind, not a classical musician with a very picky ear.
#11
Okay thanks for the responses. Any ideas about how much is worth? (50-100$/200-500$). Everyone feel free to take a shot in the dark.