#1
So I'm currently looking into building a guitar myself. I've come across a few things that have left me a bit confused.

I never knew that there were different types of input jacks. Could someone please explain to me the difference in barrel, mono, and stereo input jacks?

As far as pots go, I'm aware of the difference in the value associated with the pot (25k, 250k, or 500k) but what is the difference between a large pot and a small pot, and what is the difference in a long shaft and a short shaft?

Thanks.
#2
So as jacks go, what you're going to want is a mono jack. But before that, let's go over what you don't want. A barrel jack is a specific type of mono jack. It has what I call a jack condom on it. It looks like this. They can also look like this. A stereo jack has two bands. This means you'll need a new set of cables and new amp and new gear, and it's not worth the trouble, IMO. You get really cool sounds with them, but rig conversions are a pain in the ass. A straight-up-the-middle Switchcraft mono jack. This is one.
With pots, the difference between a large one and a small one is the size of the base of the potentiometer, and the shaft diameter. The standard size is 0.2" in diameter. You can get smaller or larger ones as well. Once you get into buying parts, you'll find different types of shaft. There are round and split shafts. The split ones are ridged, and you just push the knobs straight on. With round shafts, the knobs with have a little screw to tighten the knob on with. Generally, the shaft is 1/4 inch tall. Once again, there will be variances.
What type of guitar are you plannin' on building? And how scratch are you going?

edit1: I've built many guitars, and I totally encourage you to build all of your axes from now on. I also encourage you to make oddball guitars. Like my "Teles Paul" - Telecaster neck, Les Paul body.

edit2: This is a stereo jack. As you can see, there's another hot lug (two, rather than the one on a mono jack).
Last edited by slimjimmypage at Apr 10, 2013,
#3
Quote by MoJo-EaTeR
So I'm currently looking into building a guitar myself. I've come across a few things that have left me a bit confused.

I never knew that there were different types of input jacks. Could someone please explain to me the difference in barrel, mono, and stereo input jacks?

As far as pots go, I'm aware of the difference in the value associated with the pot (25k, 250k, or 500k) but what is the difference between a large pot and a small pot, and what is the difference in a long shaft and a short shaft?

Thanks.

First off, a barrel jack is what the majority of telecasters use because they can mount flush to the surface.2) mono jacks are basically the same as a barrel jack but without a metal sleeve around them.3) stereo jacks are used with active pickups because when unplugged the 9volts cannot reach the pickups saving the battery life

.4) large pots are generalized to sound more "full" where as small pots tend to sound tinny.5) long shaft and short shaft depend on the thickness of (insert material here) and that's about it.

You're welcome.
#4
Quote by slimjimmypage
So as jacks go, what you're going to want is a mono jack. But before that, let's go over what you don't want. A barrel jack is a specific type of mono jack. It has what I call a jack condom on it. It looks like this. They can also look like this. A stereo jack has two bands. This means you'll need a new set of cables and new amp and new gear, and it's not worth the trouble, IMO. You get really cool sounds with them, but rig conversions are a pain in the ass. A straight-up-the-middle Switchcraft mono jack. This is one.
With pots, the difference between a large one and a small one is the size of the base of the potentiometer, and the shaft diameter. The standard size is 0.2" in diameter. You can get smaller or larger ones as well. Once you get into buying parts, you'll find different types of shaft. There are round and split shafts. The split ones are ridged, and you just push the knobs straight on. With round shafts, the knobs with have a little screw to tighten the knob on with. Generally, the shaft is 1/4 inch tall. Once again, there will be variances.
What type of guitar are you plannin' on building? And how scratch are you going?

edit1: I've built many guitars, and I totally encourage you to build all of your axes from now on. I also encourage you to make oddball guitars. Like my "Teles Paul" - Telecaster neck, Les Paul body.

edit2: This is a stereo jack. As you can see, there's another hot lug (two, rather than the one on a mono jack).



This is incorrect information.
You do not need new cables for jacks that are stereo.
And that second barrel jack you posted is a stereo jack, not mono.

If you are using a barrel jack, and only need it in mono (passive pickups) Then you just simply dont use the extra lug... Simple as that.

And also incorrect for you to just say that he needs to use 500k.
It depends on what you are going to use.
250k for single coils,
500k for humbuckers
and 25k for active pickups.
#5
Quote by DESTROYER5000
First off, a barrel jack is what the majority of telecasters use because they can mount flush to the surface.2) mono jacks are basically the same as a barrel jack but without a metal sleeve around them.3) stereo jacks are used with active pickups because when unplugged the 9volts cannot reach the pickups saving the battery life

.4) large pots are generalized to sound more "full" where as small pots tend to sound tinny.5) long shaft and short shaft depend on the thickness of (insert material here) and that's about it.

You're welcome.

Seriously?

This is the jack teles use:



That's not a barrel jack, it's a regular jack mounted in a cup-style jack holder.

Large pots don't sound more full, and small pots don't sound more tinny. Larger pots allow for more highs than smaller pots. So a 500k will be brighter than a 250k, and a 1meg will be brigther than a 500k, ect.. You might call that tinny, but it's simply a matter of how much of the highs are there.

You're welcome.
#6
Quote by W4RP1G
Seriously?

This is the jack teles use:



That's not a barrel jack, it's a regular jack mounted in a cup-style jack holder.

Large pots don't sound more full, and small pots don't sound more tinny. Larger pots allow for more highs than smaller pots. So a 500k will be brighter than a 250k, and a 1meg will be brigther than a 500k, ect.. You might call that tinny, but it's simply a matter of how much of the highs are there.

You're welcome.

Notice how I said generalized as sounding more full not i know they sound more full.

So in other words don't be a dick because I'm still learning electronics, m'kay?
#7
Quote by DESTROYER5000
Notice how I said generalized as sounding more full not i know they sound more full.

So in other words don't be a dick because I'm still learning electronics, m'kay?

If you're learning, you shouldn't be offering advice. And if you're offering bad advice, I'm gonna be a dick. People come and ask questions for the right answer.

Seriously, you aren't excused from giving the wrong answer because you're learning. You shouldn't be giving answers at all until you know what you're talking about.
#8
Quote by W4RP1G
If you're learning, you shouldn't be offering advice. And if you're offering bad advice, I'm gonna be a dick. People come and ask questions for the right answer.

Seriously, you aren't excused from giving the wrong answer because you're learning. You shouldn't be giving answers at all until you know what you're talking about.

Well excuse me for trying to help but I guess if you're going to get all butt hurt about things then by all means go ahead. But I was stating what I had been told by my local tech.
I have a relative who was a school teacher and she is just like you, in case you are wondering what I mean its the " everyone who is not me is a total freaking idiot" mentality and I can't stand to be around her.
#10
Quote by DESTROYER5000
Well excuse me for trying to help but I guess if you're going to get all butt hurt about things then by all means go ahead. But I was stating what I had been told by my local tech.
I have a relative who was a school teacher and she is just like you, in case you are wondering what I mean its the " everyone who is not me is a total freaking idiot" mentality and I can't stand to be around her.

I have little patience for idiots who offer bad advise. That includes you and your local tech.
#11
Quote by W4RP1G
I have little patience for idiots who offer bad advise. That includes you and your local tech.

I have little patience for people with the "thoust is an idiot because you are not thine-self".

In other words people who are school teachers suck
#12
Quote by DESTROYER5000
I have little patience for people with the "thoust is an idiot because you are not thine-self".

In other words people who are school teachers suck


No, the problem in this lies completely in you. As stated, people come to this forum asking questions expecting right answers and good advice. Bad advice, if taken, leads to the individual spending more time/money than he has to, all the way to causing irreversible damage to his/her instrument. You can't just 'lol, sorry, I'm just learning!' that away (well you can, it's the internet, but you get my meaning).
#13
Quote by Deliriumbassist
No, the problem in this lies completely in you. As stated, people come to this forum asking questions expecting right answers and good advice. Bad advice, if taken, leads to the individual spending more time/money than he has to, all the way to causing irreversible damage to his/her instrument. You can't just 'lol, sorry, I'm just learning!' that away (well you can, it's the internet, but you get my meaning).

+1