#1
Ok so I'm about to quit the band I'm in now because the singer is the classic arrogant stereotype of the singer( he doesn't even write the music though he just sings). But, I brought two of my songs to the band that they all really liked. So how do I make sure they don't keep playing my songs in the future, or record them?
#2
Legally, if you wrote the songs 100% yourself, they are yours. If any of the other band members even suggested that you change just one word in the song, they have some ownership. Same with the music, if another member helped you with that, you both own it.


I'm not a lawyer so i'm not sure how you'd go about making sure they don't record or play your songs. You should record them first.
#3
Honestly I wouldn't worry about it. There's not really anything you can do to stop them from playing them. You could copyright them to insure that you receive royalties if they do record it, & it becomes a hit or something. But unless they hit it big there's really no point unless you wanna spend a fortune suing over a stack of quarters they owe you.
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#4
Well...You could copyright the lyrics and melody. That way at least you would own it and *IF* they miraculously made it big they could owe you royalties. Still. There's almost no way you're going to able to stop them from playing the songs unless you have a lot of money and nothing better to do and there's a good chance it won't matter anyway.

EDIT: Well shoot. That's what I get for going to get my coffee mid post.
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#6
Start a new band and play the songs better. If they like the songs they're not gonna stop playing them, and you shouldn't expect them too because as a band the songs belong to all of you in some way or another.

The best you can do is beat them at their own game, and if they're your own songs that shouldn't be difficult.
#7
Quote by Artemis Entreri


EDIT: Well shoot. That's what I get for going to get my coffee mid post.


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#8
They are your songs, if they keep playing them and they become a huge number one hit then they should credit you as the writer of those songs and you should get royalties.

Of course if they don't acknowledge you as the writer of the songs then you will have to be able to prove that you wrote the songs.

But do you really think that the band is that good that they can take your songs and turn them into gold? or do you really think that those two songs are so good that they can take that band and make them gold?
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#9
Quote by WalrusNutFart
Ok so I'm about to quit the band I'm in now because the singer is the classic arrogant stereotype of the singer( he doesn't even write the music though he just sings). But, I brought two of my songs to the band that they all really liked. So how do I make sure they don't keep playing my songs in the future, or record them?

You could just express a verbal/written agreement with them at the time of quitting. "Don't use my songs anymore" or "If you keep my songs, I expect credit where credit is due in the future."

...cause you never know.
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#10
We have a copyright sticky in bandleading that will help you copyright the songs.

Note that copyright covers lyrics and melodies, so if you just made a chord progression you do not have entitlement to copyright.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
I'm going to parrot back what these people (for the most part) said and say that if you care THAT much about your songs I'd recommend you copyright them. Come up with another 1-2 quick ones and copyright an EP of yours ASAP. You can always go back and use those same ones for an album later, redoing them with whoever but keeping the fundamental melodies and all that the same.

Copyright registration electronically is only $35 last time I did it nearly a year ago. I say make it a 3-5 song EP to make it worth your while. Mine was 5 songs that I had to finish all by myself because my guitarist was an a-hole who only cared about buying expensive gear with college grant money and not recording. So even though I'm a poor guit and bass player I practiced, simplified and looped/sequence things well enough for it to pass. In hindsight I should have had someone much MUCH better than me record the guit and bass but I just wanted it done. So yeah... you can always have a new guy sing whatever over your stuff. If you make your own software drums even easier.

As far as them playing it, who cares? You're the owner and if you register legally you're the claimant so they have no rights to your music but like the other dude said it would be stupid and frivolous financially to try to spend thousands on a lawyer going after these guys to get a measly amount of money out of them for playing your stuff. Unless of course, in the unlikely event that it makes it "big", whatever that means anymore since the large labels still in existence today seem to mostly just cater to what's marketable to young teens via pop and hip hop. Or the 8 billionth Nickelback song.
Last edited by RevileN at Apr 14, 2013,
#12
There is a TON of information in the copyright for dummies sticky that addresses all of this in detail.

What do you mean "you wrote the song"? Did you write the lyrics? Did you write the melody? Did you write the guitar riffs, the drum beat, the bass line, etc. What, exactly did you write?

You can't stop them from playing it live any more than Led Zeppelin can stop you from playing Whole Lotta Love live.

Changing a few words does NOT necessarily give you ANY ownership over it at all. If I changed a few words and a few notes of "Twist and Shout", do you really think it would give me any ownership of it? Nope.

For all the deets, see the copyright sticky.

CT
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Last edited by axemanchris at Apr 17, 2013,