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#1
Alright, short story shorter: I recently chose to become unemployed and use the time to learn stuff. I have a long term plan which requires me to save up some money and since I'm lacking any specific trade, I thought the computer world would be a the way to go.

What are some useful programs to know that can lead to some well paid jobs?

Cheers!
#5
Learn C# and write the programs that companies want.

or maybe just a new porn site with fetish-specific sections.
This ends now, eat the goddamn beans!
#6
F**k, C# sounds difficult. There are proper schools that teach C# for years, I'm sure it would be a rough ride doing it by yourself.

How about web design? Too many people know that already?
#7
It probably is difficult - but that's why they pay decent money to write in it. If you are afraid of hard work you aren't going to earn good money.

Why have you "decided" to be unemployed without having a plan in place?

Don't let your boat be empty, don't be a sunken dream
Don't let the boat regret thee, for what you could have seen

#9
I guess you could deal with web design if you're too afraid of real programming.
#10
Quote by Blayney
It probably is difficult - but that's why they pay decent money to write in it. If you are afraid of hard work you aren't going to earn good money.

Why have you "decided" to be unemployed without having a plan in place?


Alright, it makes sense. I'm not afraid of hard work, it's just if there is an easier way I'd prefer that. It's simple thermo dynamics.

I have a plan, getting money for it is the final stage. I want to relax before I start earning the big money yo. No but seriously, you can plan a lot better being unemployed and not having your mind occupied and dumbed down all the time.

Edit: Okey, so let's say I choose programming. How should I proceed from now? The only thing I know about C# that it's a language so I guess you could use several programs to learn C#. Which one is the most common?
Last edited by MetalMullet at Apr 13, 2013,
#11
learn how to give amazing blowjobs and blow your way right up the corporate ladder!


or get really good at photoshop or something
It's over simplified, So what!

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#12
I suggest you learn Java before C#, it might be easier that way
#13
Quote by Obsceneairwaves
learn how to give amazing blowjobs and blow your way right up the corporate ladder!


You know what, I have actually thought about it. I just don't think there is enough demand for that kind of service within the corporate hierarchy. That's why I've quit. I couldn't blow anyone.
#14
Learning MAX would be interesting to do. I will be learing it myself in the next year or so.
#15
Quote by NothingRocks
Short answer:

There are none.

This. I would recommend learning how to pad your resume and BS job interviews, maybe learn how to make friends in high places if you can.

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#16
Quote by Burkz
I suggest you learn Java before C#, it might be easier that way

I actually recommend Ruby for people just getting into programming. It can be a little oversimplistic if you plan to do proper software dev, but you can spend more time learning about actual programming rather than spending hours wondering why the fuck your program is broken and your editor/compiler doesn't catch that you used a semicolon instead of a comma somewhere.

I started with C++ (yes, it probably made me a better programmer)
#17
Quote by jthm_guitarist
This. I would recommend learning how to pad your resume and BS job interviews


That is obvious, I'll do that of course. But even if I manage to bullshit myself to a job I'm not qualified for on paper, I wouldn't mind if there was some real knowledge behind it.

Thanks for the advices guys! Keep em comin'!
#19
I think you'll have a hard time explaining "it was better for me to be unemployed" in your next job interview. Unless you go into full time education. Even then a part time night/weekend job would be worth having. Employers need to know you can hold a job, be punctual and work within a team etc. etc.

Don't let your boat be empty, don't be a sunken dream
Don't let the boat regret thee, for what you could have seen

#20
As for programming, I would start with the simplest language you can find.
The language itself itself isn't really the most important aspect of learning to program, its the various thought processes you need to develop.
Once you become proficient in one language, learning another more difficult language becomes much easier.
I once took a beginning C++ class at a Junior college but had already been programming in other languages for about 4 - 5 years. I went through the entire textbook's lessons in about 5 weeks (I then dropped it due to boredom).
Programming is part art, part science.

But its not really something you can learn to do proficiently in a few months.
At least not for the job market.
You can try writing shareware, but its a vicious and over-saturated market.
But hey, you may have a really great idea and/or get lucky.

Pick a language, download some programs that include source code and dig into it.
Thats pretty much how I started.

For the record, I started by learning Basic and went from there to eventually learn (including scripting languages) :
Basic
Pascal (mostly with Delphi)
C/C++
HTML
Java
Javascript
perl
And probably a few others.

Or you can try and learn something like Autocad.
That will take years though.
But programming is not an overnight thing either.

It might be easier to make suggestion knowing what kind of time frame you are thinking about.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Apr 13, 2013,
#21
Well, it's all a matter of how you put it. I probably won't say on my next interview (which hopefully be far away) that I prefered to be unemployed. I got kids, taken care of ill relatives, volountary work, kidnapped, prison or got stuck with my dick in the oven. There are a lot of plausible stories to tell that will actually put me into a better position.
#22
Good luck getting a job as a programmer without any experience.

I'm not sure how long you plan on being unemployed but if it is less than a year then you are shit out of luck. Learning to program take a lot of time, but on top of that they will also want to make sure you can work with a team etc etc.

I stand by my first post, you should learn the ins and outs of the basic programs every company uses, then look at what experience employers require for an area you are interested in and learn that.

It sounds like you are biting off more than you can chew and you will just be pissing your time away without anything to show for it.
#23
Think off an app concept.

Write out what it must do.

Find a programmer who is willing to program it for you

???

Profit

Edit:
In all seriousness though. This is something I have been busy with. I have several concepts, and people basically lay down 99 cents very easily if it sounds good.

Even if it's shite no refund on apps.

Making money isn't about having the best product...really divulge this if you want to earn some.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Apr 13, 2013,
#24
Have a look at this guys tutorial videos and decide if any of it is right for you http://thenewboston.org/

But seriously you're not going to get a job programming without an education. You'd have to start at the bottom like Customer Support.
#25
Quote by maggot9779
Good luck getting a job as a programmer without any experience.

I'm not sure how long you plan on being unemployed but if it is less than a year then you are shit out of luck. Learning to program take a lot of time, but on top of that they will also want to make sure you can work with a team etc etc.

I stand by my first post, you should learn the ins and outs of the basic programs every company uses, then look at what experience employers require for an area you are interested in and learn that.

It sounds like you are biting off more than you can chew and you will just be pissing your time away without anything to show for it.


Well, I interpreted your first post as sarcastic, but with more insight in your logic I see what you ment now. It makes sense. Although I can't really see what kind of new opportunities it would open up for me since the Office kit is pretty much a requirement in most computer related jobs and I already master the basics. If they want pro skills I can just fake that I have it and learn the programs before I start working. And it's not an impossibility that I won't be able to chew this bone, I'm just checking my options here. I'm open to basically any new trade that pays good and can be mastered under a year or so. I thought something within IT could work. My other plan is welding. Can be learnt pretty fast and pays well in some countries.

Quote by Rebel Scum
Have a look at this guys tutorial videos and decide if any of it is right for you http://thenewboston.org/

But seriously you're not going to get a job programming without an education. You'd have to start at the bottom like Customer Support.


Thanks man, I'll have a look. Regarding education, I always thought that IT, being pretty new and fresh, is less stale when it comes to "experience and education" requirements than the rest of the available jobs on the market. Also, it's pretty easy to show off your skills. And who wouldn't prefer a self taught basement dwelling geek over an over educated tie-wearing snob? Although I might be totally wrong here...
#26
Microsoft Office, AutoCAD, Programming Languages, 3D Design. A bunch of possibilities.
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#27
Quote by NothingRocks
Short answer:

There are none.


Short review of your answer:

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#28
Learn a bit of C, then C++. After that, you could go to object oriented C#.
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#29
Don't learn C#. It's horrible and microsofty and mostly useless.
Don't learn C++. It's horrible and you will never want to program again if it's your first language.
If you want a C language, Objective-C is probably the nicest, but is exclusive to mac (afaik) so that could restrict you, so go with just plain C. Much less of a pain in the arse than C++.

But really you should just learn Python. Python is the best.
#30
Thanks for the suggestions! So which one of the languages is the most common? And once you "learn" one of the C languages, is it easier to learn another one?
#31
go here codeacademy.com

then maybe do Python->Java->C++->C/ASM

use coursera.org to your advantage, lots of great tutorials on youtube too

learn how code is handled by operating systems and computer architecture


learn welding
#32
Quote by MetalMullet
Thanks for the suggestions! So which one of the languages is the most common?

Depends where you work. C++ is supposedly the standard for businesses producing an application. If you want to do any web-based stuff, learn PHP. It's a nice language too and a good place to start for programming in general. I work in a research place and we use python and matlab almost exclusively (matlab is being phased out in favour of python generally).
Quote by MetalMullet
And once you "learn" one of the C languages, is it easier to learn another one?

Yeah, and this doesn't just apply to C languages, but all of them. The skills you gain are transferrable.
Last edited by captainsnazz at Apr 13, 2013,
#33
Quote by captainsnazz
Don't learn C#. It's horrible and microsofty and mostly useless.
Don't learn C++. It's horrible and you will never want to program again if it's your first language.
If you want a C language, Objective-C is probably the nicest, but is exclusive to mac (afaik) so that could restrict you, so go with just plain C. Much less of a pain in the arse than C++.

But really you should just learn Python. Python is the best.

I'd actually recommend that he start out on Java. Java doesn't have too many advanced concepts (no pointers or linked lists, for instance) and is also C-based. The advantage of Java is that every device, from computers (both Mac and Windows) to smartphones use Java these days. It's incredibly portable.

@TS:
If you're going to learn any C-based language, btw, you're going to need to purchase a decent IDE (integrated developer environment) program. Visual Studio is what a lot of professionals use. I'd also recommend purchasing a Java textbook and working through that.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Apr 13, 2013,
#34
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
I'd actually recommend that he start out on Java. Java doesn't have too many advanced concepts (no pointers or linked lists, for instance) and is also C-based.


http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/LinkedList.html


id say start with C, just for the absolute basics, dowhile, if, else, functions, scanf,etc then you could try out java. c# is similar to java so you wont have trouble learning it

start off with dev c++ and jcreator

if youre looking for something easier you could try HTML, CSS, javascript and PHP
#35
An IDE would be useful down the line but is far from necessary when starting out. I still only use gedit and notepad++. And Java has a built in LinkedList class. You could even learn how to implement one in Python.
#36
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
I'd actually recommend that he start out on Java. Java doesn't have too many advanced concepts (no pointers or linked lists, for instance) and is also C-based. The advantage of Java is that every device, from computers (both Mac and Windows) to smartphones use Java these days. It's incredibly portable.

@TS:
If you're going to learn any C-based language, btw, you're going to need to purchase a decent IDE (integrated developer environment) program. Visual Studio is what a lot of professionals use. I'd also recommend purchasing a Java textbook and working through that.

Java is still a bit of a pain for a beginner. Remember that you don't just have to learn the language, you have to understand how to get an actual program that will run out of it.
Java is nice cos of the portability thing though.

However, I definitely would not recommend buying an IDE. You don't need it. Xcode is free, and I don't know what the Windows equivalent is but I assume that's free too. And there are tons of free IDEs for every programming language. I use Xcode for C type languages and aptana studio for python.
I also don't recommend using a textbook. You can get similar lessons on the internet, also for free, and with the added advantage that it's not in a physical book (which you can't exactly copy into your computer and run).
#37
Learn Linux and become a bitchin system admin for a local company.
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#38
Quote by muffinduck01
Learn Linux and become a bitchin system admin for a local company.


Learning Linux, database management, networks and security is a good option but I don't think it can be as easily translated into a job without a degree of some sort. With programming on the other hand, you could build up a portfolio and show off your experience without necessarily getting a degree.
#39
If part of your life plan involves getting advice from complete strangers on the internet you may want to go back to your job. That being said, video editing is awesome. And if you become really good at it you can make a lot of money freelancing. Look into Final Cut Pro, Avid, or Adobe Premiere.
#40
Quote by MetalMullet
F**k, C# sounds difficult. There are proper schools that teach C# for years, I'm sure it would be a rough ride doing it by yourself.

How about web design? Too many people know that already?

C# isn't difficult at all.

You can learn the basics of C# in a week, and know more than enough to start writing basic programs.

In order to write programs that are worthwhile, you'll have to know more, of course, but a basic knowledge in programming can only be greatly beneficial.
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