#1
I just bought a Harmony parlour guitar at a garage sale and it sounds really nice but has some intonation that I would like to fix. Is it possible/easy to improve the intonation on a parlour guitar?

also, I got the guitar for 25 dollars. Is that a good deal for a Harmony?
Last edited by Bakinbacon at Apr 13, 2013,
#2
Pushing 40 years ago, I had two Harmony guitars. They were both turds, basically starter instruments.

Public opinion seems to have changed about these guitars, and certain models may have accrued a modest collectible value. My opinion hasn't changed one iota. That said, I don't get the last word, at least not as often as I'd like .

Since I'm left handed, and they didn't make left handed guitars back in the day, I'm the one who should be complaining about intonation issues with any acoustic, let alone Harmonies. (Had to string em upside down).

In any case, thanks for posting this, you've made me feel better now that I've had a chance to vent...

As for your intonation issues, there's little to nothing you can do to improve the intonation of your guitar. The causes vary, from misplaced frets, to the bridge being glued on at the correct position, to a dodgy set of strings, to simple error that is inherent in any instrument with a nonadjustable saddle. Take your pick.

As I recall, early acoustics had quite narrow saddle slots. That being the case, there isn't any wiggle room to grind offsets in the saddle, for the purpose of making even a minor adjustment. Sorry....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 13, 2013,
#3
i suggest you talk to steve at vintageparlorguitars.com - he's a SUPER nice guy and he restores these all the time. when it comes to these vintage harmony guitars, he's the man.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#4
Intonation problems are really difficult or impossible to correct, but what you can do is to tune the string in a way that gives you the best compromise. For example I tune my A string a little low, because I have a problem that when I fret a C (third fret) it's a bit sharp... so by tuning the A string very slightly low, a C comes out much better... which is important to me, because I use it quite a bit for C major chords.

It just depends where you usually play on the neck... most everything I do is on the top 3-4 frets. If I played more widely up and down the neck, that would probably be harder to deal with.
Last edited by Prescott_Player at Apr 14, 2013,
#5
well i was thinking of adding a tailpiece to the guitar and changing the bridge. would that help or am i wasting money doing this?
#6
My gut feeling, without seeing the guitar, is that you really can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear... in other words, don't throw good money after bad. It's not likely to be fixable, and you'll just end up with the project guitar from hell and a flat wallet. Do the smart thing... sell it and get something better.
#7
i've actually seen this done a couple times and it did work. that being said, have you ever done something like that before?

Quote by Bakinbacon
well i was thinking of adding a tailpiece to the guitar and changing the bridge. would that help or am i wasting money doing this?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!