#1
Hi!

Me and my band are playing in a garage in the middle of a neighbourhood, and we have to play really loud because of a hard hitting drummer.

The problem is that most of this sound is leaking out and it's disturbing the neighbours.

So are there any ways of soundproofing without paying too much?
And since we've got concrete floor and plaster walls, so the acoustic isn't very good neither, so that might be something to keep in mind aswell?

Thanks!
#4
Quote by chatterbox272
Tell your drummer to hit softer or put some practice pads on the kit then turn down?

They should practice there music as its supposed to be though..
#5
Add density/mass to the walls, and doors, and cover as much as you can with soft and rounded/rough surface materials that will disperse any reflections Without knowing more about the room there's not much we can say, and you definitely won't be able to truly soundproof it without significant changes and structural reconstruction.
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#6
Quote by Gillthenasty
Hi!

So are there any ways of soundproofing without paying too much?
Thanks!


In a word... no. Soundproofing is never cheap. It always requires significant construction or reconstruction. Anything you simply put up and attach to the walls will merely dampen things a bit and control reflections and make it sound like you're in a closet.

More later... off to work.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by DisarmGoliath
you definitely won't be able to truly soundproof it without significant changes and structural reconstruction.


To add to this a little, normally soundproofing is done by creating a "room within a room" so that the inner wall and out wall are not touching.
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Quote by DisarmGoliath
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#8
Quote by roaraudio
They should practice there music as its supposed to be though..

Supposed to be? Music isn't supposed to be anything. You can't play loud, not disturb the neighbors, and spend crap all on it. You have to pick two:
Spend very little/nothing and don't disturb the neighbors by playing quieter or with pads
spend nothing and play loud but have pissed off neighbors (who may call the cops depending on laws)
play loud without disturbing the neighbors by investing some serious cash in a soundproofed room, or maybe less in an electronic kit and amp.

Those are your options, don't like it? tough shit welcome to life.
#9
Quote by chatterbox272
Supposed to be? Music isn't supposed to be anything. You can't play loud, not disturb the neighbors, and spend crap all on it. You have to pick two:
Spend very little/nothing and don't disturb the neighbors by playing quieter or with pads
spend nothing and play loud but have pissed off neighbors (who may call the cops depending on laws)
play loud without disturbing the neighbors by investing some serious cash in a soundproofed room, or maybe less in an electronic kit and amp.

Those are your options, don't like it? tough shit welcome to life.

And then there's all the other options that everyone else came up with?

And we're playing instruments, real instruments. We're a rock band.
#10
Quote by Gillthenasty
And then there's all the other options that everyone else came up with?

Which Chatterbox summarized.

And we're playing instruments, real instruments. We're a rock band.

Good for you, but this comment is silly. If your drummer is so damn loud (and you're worried about the neighbors), then you should NOT go, "Oh, well...an electronic drum kit is NOT a real instrument. We're a rock band; we won't even consider an electronic drum kit!" Instead, you should go, "Oh, hey...this is a valid option. I know that you really like your regular kit, drummer, and we can pull it out for live shows. But we can turn the volume down this way."

Alternatively, spend cash on something else. There's no cheap way to go about this, but buying an electronic drum kit may be cheaper than soundproofing the garage.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Apr 15, 2013,
#11
Our drummer usually plays pretty loud and aggressive, we've never had any trouble writing/arranging/practising using his electronic kit. Your eyes will thank you, and you can actually hear more clearly what is going on when you're playing quieter like that. We usually practice at a level where the vocalist needs no amplification.
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#12
I suppose another option is practice somewhere else.

In all seriousness, soundproofing is prohibitively expensive.

Here is a post I made a while back on this issue:


Start with this:

Actual soundproofing is expensive because it is actual reconstruction of a room. There are also factors such as where the room is.

Consider this: Remember the age-old tin can and string telephone experiment? The sound travels from the tin can along the string and to the tin can at the other end. Sound travels through solid surfaces better than it travels through air. Sound will have a harder time moving the particles of a material that is more massive, though. The concrete floor of a basement or a garage will not relay sound nearly as effectively as, say, a wooden floor joist of your attic.

So, you need to have mass, an air space, and then more mass. The 'inner' mass and the 'outer mass' can not be connected in any way to each other. They must be separated *entirely* by this air space. (or in more practical terms.... must be separated from each other in such a way that sound will not pass easily from one to the other. The word used here is "decoupling.")

Example. Main floor bedroom. Simply screw sheets of drywall over top of the existing drywall to have a double-drywall wall. Sound will travel through drywall layer number one, through the screws and into the wooden framing behind. It will travel along the wooden frame structure to various parts of the house. It will also travel along the floor to the floor joists (and similarly along the ceiling and the ceiling joists), quickly traveling all over the house and to the outside where it will bother the neighbours.

Example 2: Concrete basement floor (or garage) with concrete walls. Frame wall not directly in front of, but an inch or so in front of the concrete wall. This will leave an airspace between the frame and the wall so sound cannot travel from the framing to the wall. Drywall over top. ( and insulate, of course). Sound will travel, but not well, along the concrete floor. First, because it is concrete, and second, because it is directly against the earth, which will help prevent it from vibrating and will further absorb the sound. You can't get more massive than a big slab of concrete sitting on the earth. But what do you attach your wall frames to? The ceiling? Nope. Sound will then travel along the ceiling to the upper floors, or to the rim joists and to the outside. You have to create a 'false ceiling' that doesn't actually touch the 'real' ceiling. It can be suspended from your wall frames. You have essentially built a room inside your room, without actually touching the outer room. THIS is what you want.

Now.... you've stopped sound from traveling through your solid surfaces. Remember that sound will also travel through the air. Consider doors and windows. You want to make the room air tight. If air can get out, sound can get out. It might only be a small crack under the door, but a 2mm gap underneath a 1m wide door is 2000mm2, or the equivalent of a 4cm x 5cm hole in the middle of your wall. Pretty significant.

But wait! If there is no air getting out of the room.... there is no air getting INTO the room. Sound like a problem? You betcha. You'd really hate to asphyxiate yourself in the middle of a practice session. So your next trick is getting air in without air getting out... and without jeopardizing the integrity of your physical structures....oh, geez.... head starting to hurt? Mine is!

You can see why this gets very difficult and expensive.

Now, in terms of all that, how much benefit do you really think you'll get from matresses, egg cartons, duvets, etc?

Well... how much mass do you have? Not so much. Do you have an airspace between them? Not so much. Have you eliminated sound traveling along floor and ceiling joists? Nope. Have you addressed air leaks? Nope.

Sure, these materials will muffle things to some small degree, but honestly, don't expect much.


... and then there is the reality that, the louder you practice, the harder it is to hear how tight you are, or things like tuning issues, etc. When you turn the volume down, you really do notice stuff.

A good electronic kit will cost about $1500. Even rudimentary soundproofing of a garage will probably set you back 5-10 times that.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Couple of other things....

Your formula for sound reduction is basically:

mass + insulation + mass = soundproof

where the greater the mass and the greater the insulation, the greater the soundproofing.

.. and here is a good article to get you started on the "room within a room" idea.

http://www.diy-home-theater-design.com/room-within-a-room.html

I STRONGLY advise two resources:

http://www.amazon.com/Home-Recording-Studio-Build-Like/dp/1598630342

That ^ book is written in very friendly language, and is really well explained. I can't recommend it enough. I have it. The author is Rod Gervais, and the book is, by most people's standards, the bible on building a home (or garage) studio. It also recommends techniques, materials, a bit of acoustical physics, etc.

http://johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/index.php

This ^ forum is hands-down the best resource on the internet for studio construction. John Sayers builds studios into the 100's of thousands of dollars and you can see his work on the site. He frequents the forum. Rod Gervais, the author of the book above also frequents the forum. So do many other bedroom experts, as well as many who are actually acoustical engineers.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
Quote by Gillthenasty
And then there's all the other options that everyone else came up with?

No, they're just more in depth explanations on how to go about doing the points I listed.

Quote by Gillthenasty
And we're playing instruments, real instruments. We're a rock band.


You're one of "those" people are you? who think rock can't be rock without cranked tube amp stacks, a loud drum kit, and bleeding ears.

You're pretty much trying to get something for nothing. a basic electronic drum kit would do the job and cost like $500. A good one that feels/looks more like a proper kit will cost more. Building a whole second - totally isolated and insulated - room inside your present one is going to cost even more. I've given you the best options you have, if you don't like them then that's not my issue.
#15
Mass loaded vinyl pasted to your walls would be the most effective thing for you. But it'd probably on give you (at best) an stc rating if 20, if your bothered to full the gaps with acoustically rated silicon.
#16
^ except if you simply attach them to your walls, the value for "insulation" in the following formula = 0.

mass + insulation + mass = soundproof

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.