#1
Is this the right forum for music theory and soloing questions?

In a way, if you know the major scale pattern, you kind of also know a bunch of modes, and you also know minor scales. (by moving the major scale pattern to different places on the fretboard)

So, I'd like to try out this idea of relative minor and practice playing lead with the notes of A (natural) minor. (A minor has the same notes as C major)

I do know about harmonizing the major scale and ending up with: I ii iii IV V vi vii(dim)
But, I want to do this with A minor scale (shape of C major notes)
Which chords harmonize with the A minor scale?
i ii(dim) III(flat) iv v VI(flat) VII(flat)
Does this mean: Am Bm C Dm Em F G ?
How does the G fit, b/c G is not even in the A minor scale!

Also, can you give me a nice common sample progression (eg: I IV V) that would work with the A minor scale (which is just the notes of C major)?
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#2
G is in the A minor natural minor scale.

Am F G is a common minor progression.

Scales are made of notes, not shapes. The C note in C major is the very same C note that is in A minor.

The resolution of the song (ie. The key) will determine whether you are playing the C major or A minor scale. You can't just play the A minor shape and change the key, so there's no "playing the relative minor".
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
So, I can play Am F G as rhythm, and play notes from the C major scale (A minor) and it should sound harmonious, correct?
1978 Les Paul Custom Sunburst
2001 USA Strat (Hot & Cool Rails)
Effects: Boss GT-6 with Tech-21 Power Amp
#4
yeah. The A minor scale isn't just some position on the fretboard. All the positions of the C major scale on the neck are also the same positions as A natural minor. The harmony that is happening under you is what determines what it sounds like.

If you play these 3 notes on the guitar separately. C E G, with a C major chord under you, it's going to sound like C major. Play those same exact notes in the same exact order over a Am chord, and now you are playing in a natural minor tonality, specifically you are creating an Am7 sound.

So Alan has it right, it's not just about scales, it's all about what is happening under you.
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#5
Yea, that is all obvious when you're playing. Obviously, I will be resolving to the A note over an A minor progression, and I'd resolve naturally to the C if playing over a C major progression. To keep things simple, I am just referring to the 7 notes I play to use in the leads as A minor / C major. Same thing, in terms of which notes I am including/excluding.
1978 Les Paul Custom Sunburst
2001 USA Strat (Hot & Cool Rails)
Effects: Boss GT-6 with Tech-21 Power Amp
#6
^^^ I think you're missingsomethin

If the key is C major, it will always resolve to C regardless of what notes you play. You could play the B major scale over the key of C and it will still resolve to C. Sure it will sound awful but that's because you're using some awful choices of accidentals rather than some mystery resolution change.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
Quote by MissingSomethin
Yea, that is all obvious when you're playing. Obviously, I will be resolving to the A note over an A minor progression, and I'd resolve naturally to the C if playing over a C major progression. To keep things simple, I am just referring to the 7 notes I play to use in the leads as A minor / C major. Same thing, in terms of which notes I am including/excluding.


Yeah all the positions you know of the C major scale arethe same as A minor, same notes.

In fact, these days I think strictly in major key centers, even if the key of the song is A minor. In my head I just think C major, because it helps me visualize the fretboard. That combined with chord tones satisfies most music out there.
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"Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible."
#8
Quote by MissingSomethin
So, I can play Am F G as rhythm, and play notes from the C major scale (A minor) and it should sound harmonious, correct?


Yes, but this is a gross oversimplification.

To keep things simple, I am just referring to the 7 notes I play to use in the leads as A minor / C major. Same thing, in terms of which notes I am including/excluding.


You aren't limited to just 7 notes ya know? Like everyone has already pointed out & you still don't seem to grasp, there's more to it than just looking at the chords & wantonly playing scales over them. Even if you use the notes of the appropriate scale there are still dissonances that will appear if you just bang them out.

Start with chord tone soloing, watching the chords & trying to end lines on notes contained within the chords. Then once you've began to internalize the sounds of each note then slowly add in 7ths or other notes of the scale to feel out how each of these notes affect the harmony, then if you want to explore more start working in the 5 remaining notes.(some will certainly be dissonant, but there will be situations where that may be the sound you want.)

It's not just a work on it a week & you know it kind of thing to truly internalize the sounds of your instrument. It's a life long journey.
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#9
Your problem is, TS...you're still thinking in terms of "what scale works over what chord progression". What you should be thinking is, "How do I play in this key, in such a manner that I harmonize well with the chords I've chosen?"
#10
I don't know that anyone really answered your question about chord progressions in a minor key...? Here is the formula for Major and Minor...you were on the right track!

CHORDS IN A MAJOR KEY


1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Maj Min Min Maj Maj Min Dim


CHORDS IN A MINOR KEY


1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Min Dim Maj Min Min Maj Maj


MANY Songs are written using the 1st, 4th, and 5th Chords of the key, so if a song is in the key of Amaj. You would likely hear
Amaj, Dmaj, Emaj. OR in Amin. --- Am,Dmaj,Emaj.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Amaj Bm Cm Dmaj Emaj Fmin Gdim
#11
Quote by Lhmcg
I don't know that anyone really answered your question about chord progressions in a minor key...? Here is the formula for Major and Minor...you were on the right track!

CHORDS IN A MAJOR KEY


1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Maj Min Min Maj Maj Min Dim


CHORDS IN A MINOR KEY


1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Min Dim Maj Min Min Maj Maj


MANY Songs are written using the 1st, 4th, and 5th Chords of the key, so if a song is in the key of Amaj. You would likely hear
Amaj, Dmaj, Emaj. OR in Amin. --- Am,Dmaj,Emaj.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Amaj Bm Cm Dmaj Emaj Fmin Gdim

We already covered that. We've moved onto to telling TS that he's missing the details...

You also appear to be oversimplifying it, just like TS.
#12
Quote by MissingSomethin
So, I can play Am F G as rhythm, and play notes from the C major scale (A minor) and it should sound harmonious, correct?

It won't be the C major scale.
#13
Quote by MissingSomethin
To keep things simple, I am just referring to the 7 notes I play to use in the leads as A minor / C major. Same thing, in terms of which notes I am including/excluding.


This is a really bad approach - even though it's one most players spend a small amount of time in - and it leads to "wanking" - letting your fingers lead your solo, rather than letting your ears and brain drive your solo.

Because the function of each note is completely different in the major and minor scale. They are not interchangeable. In C major, the C note sounds one way. In the Am, a C note sounds completely different. This is easiest to hear with your tonics but it's equally true for all notes of the scale (and your non-scale notes, too).

And so long as you are thinking of Am and C major as the same scale, you can't make that change.