#1
I'll try to make this short

I took lessons for a few months and the guy only taught me the basic chords. I'd walk into his place and he'd be like what do you wanna learn? and i was like... i wanna learn how to play ****in guitar. So i'd tell him a song, he'd listen to it on youtube, write the chords down and that was all he ever did for me. Taught me some chords.

So i stopped takin lessons. Figured out how to read tabs only after having quit lessons and started learning songs on my own. Got very interested in "theory". I figured i should go back to taking lessons so i could like learn some theory in a "practical" way. So i went to my first lesson the other day and asked my teacher if he could teach me about music theory. After the lesson was done i didn't learn a ****ing thing. He talked for 30 mins, but essentially just wrote down all the notes in the chromatic scale in my notebook at that was it. I already knew all the notes in the chromatic scale. He didn't give me anything to actually practice. I was a little frustrated that he didn't have more information for me. I know he's good at guitar. So what should i be asking him for?

Sorry this wasnt short.
#2
First, get another teacher. Although that guy might be able to play guitar, he's not a teacher.

I'd ask around for a good teacher. Visit music stores, etc. Remember, if you are paying for lessons, you should be getting them.
#3
First lessons are difficult for both parties as well, unless the lesson is a masterclass or clinic type of situation where the topic is preplanned.
#4
Yeah I'm agreeing on that you may need a new teacher. A good teacher should lead you in the right direction, not expect you to know what you need to learn. However you should have some goal or direction when playing. Just "wanna learn to play ****in guitar" is not a clear goal.
you're never as free as when you are lost
#5
What music are you looking to play, and where are you geographically?
http://richmusic.dmusic.com

"Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible."
#6
First, define exactly what you want to learn. Ask the teacher if he can help you meet those goals. And tell him exactly what you know already because he can be able to test you on that.
We're all alright!
#7
Quote by Vlasco
First lessons are difficult for both parties as well, unless the lesson is a masterclass or clinic type of situation where the topic is preplanned.


That so true. It's tough because the guitar is complex and there is a lot to learn and no predefined way to start.

Your objectives:
1. Technique
2. Theory and application
3. Transcribing and reading tab
#8
To get the most out of any teacher... sit on their lap. Short of doing that, give it a month. You'll see what its moving into from there. From what your first teacher did was not to show you he could quickly hear a song and give you the skeleton outline of the track. He gave you what you asked for. It was up to you to ask, once given the song, why did the artist do it like this.

My personal favourite to that question is "Because he can"... then delve into progressions. If it involves a riff, then the follow up would be explaining the concept behind the riff and why it follows that specific progression. But if they didn't ask, I don't tell them. Reason: most students run when anything theoretical is spoken about. They immediately get this deer caught in headlights look, followed by the animation of what you just said going over their head. So until they ask, I don't explain.

Another thing the first guy could have been doing is getting you to hear progressions. But seeing as you just told him "a song"... thats what you got. Your recent teacher is giving you an outline of the notes available... wait for the follow up, tell him you already know it. Better yet, write down what you know in list form, give it to him - he'll skim it, ask where you wanna go, what you wanna do.. and there you have it.

Communication is key between teacher and student, but the teacher is not a mind reader. If the student is not new to guitar I ask them to play for me in the first lesson. From that I get a lot of info alone, but if the student fails to speak, then I have to suck a lot of it out of my thumb. Speak up!!!
#9
Quote by sweetdude3000
That so true. It's tough because the guitar is complex and there is a lot to learn and no predefined way to start.

Your objectives:
1. Technique
2. Theory and application
3. Transcribing and reading tab


It's difficult because you have no idea who your student is as a person, where they are as a technical guitarist, where they are as a theorist, where they are as a performer, and what sort of goals they have.

First lessons are often free because it takes the entire lesson to assess what sort of musician and person the student is - to expect anything miraculous from a first lesson is unreasonable.

How well this information can be gathered is partly the job of the teacher's guidance through a bunch of quick tests, and partly the job of the honesty in the student's answers. If the student doesn't work with the teacher by showing them what they know, what they can do, and where they are looking to be, then even a good teacher will have difficulty helping in a useful way.

If the teacher is good, their system will also usually bear some fairly immediate results within a couple weeks, but will begin to shine only after several months - after the groundwork of their curriculum has been made secure.
#10
Well, with your first teacher, you just asked to learn some song. When he figured it out for you and showed you, you were disappointed that it was "just chords" or whatever. Where as your second guitar teacher, all you said was "Teach me theory". He assumed that you nothing about it, so he started from square 1.

The best thing you can do with your current teacher and any future teacher you have is write down what you know about Theory (the understanding of basic chord and scale knowledge, keys, etc), playing in general (chords and scales), and actual songs you know. Once you have a general list of what you know, make another list of things that you want to work on and improve.

Also, you should let him know what your goals are for playing guitar. During the first few lessons, he should see where your at in your technical and theory aspects of the instrument.

If you don't speak up during a lesson, you'll never learn anything. The best way to learn is to ask questions and the best way for your teacher to properly teach you is to understand the problems and questions you have.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#11
not that it makes an difference... but just saying i went back to the same guy. it's not two different teachers
#12
Quote by tall011
I'll try to make this short

I took lessons for a few months and the guy only taught me the basic chords. I'd walk into his place and he'd be like what do you wanna learn? and i was like... i wanna learn how to play ****in guitar. So i'd tell him a song, he'd listen to it on youtube, write the chords down and that was all he ever did for me. Taught me some chords.

So i stopped takin lessons. Figured out how to read tabs only after having quit lessons and started learning songs on my own. Got very interested in "theory". I figured i should go back to taking lessons so i could like learn some theory in a "practical" way. So i went to my first lesson the other day and asked my teacher if he could teach me about music theory. After the lesson was done i didn't learn a ****ing thing. He talked for 30 mins, but essentially just wrote down all the notes in the chromatic scale in my notebook at that was it. I already knew all the notes in the chromatic scale. He didn't give me anything to actually practice. I was a little frustrated that he didn't have more information for me. I know he's good at guitar. So what should i be asking him for?

Sorry this wasnt short.


I completely understand. When I read "wrote down the chromatic scale" I wanted to pull my hair out. I get it. In a nutshell, the way traditional theory is taught, sucks, but...it's all they have, so that's why they have to do it that way. One day I'd love to debate a traditional theory teacher in front of an audience, and show first hand all the downsides of the traditional method, in almost every facet of theory and guitar instruction in general.

Check your inbox here, I am going to throw a few things your way.

Best,

Sean
#14
Quote by Vlasco
It's difficult because you have no idea who your student is as a person, where they are as a technical guitarist, where they are as a theorist, where they are as a performer, and what sort of goals they have.

First lessons are often free because it takes the entire lesson to assess what sort of musician and person the student is - to expect anything miraculous from a first lesson is unreasonable.

How well this information can be gathered is partly the job of the teacher's guidance through a bunch of quick tests, and partly the job of the honesty in the student's answers. If the student doesn't work with the teacher by showing them what they know, what they can do, and where they are looking to be, then even a good teacher will have difficulty helping in a useful way.

If the teacher is good, their system will also usually bear some fairly immediate results within a couple weeks, but will begin to shine only after several months - after the groundwork of their curriculum has been made secure.


I totally agree with everything you said 100%. I imagine it must be difficult because people don't read minds. I think for absolute beginners it's tough because they usually don't know what they want: they want to just play music and have fun. Or they don't know how theory will help them because it's a major time investment & often dry the way its taught. Like you said, though, a good teacher will know how to check for musical knowledge and know how to communicate effectively. But yea tall011 you just need to work hard, talk these concepts out and give it time for the results to sink into your brain.
#15
Musical theory can't be debated.... Music is Music -- Theory is only a language used to discuss Music in a way so that everyone can communicate easier once you know the language...

The issue here is that way too many people that teach guitar, should not be doing so!!