#1
I made a mistake and now my amp is messed up. I doubt there will be any kind of quick fix but I thought I would ask you all for tips since I am between jobs and probably won't be able to take it in to get fixed for awhile.

Long story short, I accidentally left it on and it got pretty hot. I turned it off and let it cool down for several hours before trying to play it again but now there is a rather noticeable (loud) humming sound while I am playing. The only way I've found to get it to subside is to turn the tone knob down all the way which I don't like.

Yes, I feel dumb. Anyone have any ideas on what exactly it could be and/or how I could fix it?

The head is a B52 AT-100 as to be seen here:
http://www.b-52stealthseries.com/ATSeries.html
Last edited by Rotschefeller at Apr 16, 2013,
#2
One possibility is cathode stripping on your tubes... or was that cathode poisoning. A retube should solve the problem.
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#3
tube amps

leaving them on just wears on the tubes anything else that would be daamages would notjust add noise

try changing the tubes that should fix it
#4
+1 just replace the tubes. How long did you leave it on though?

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#5
I don't think cathode stripping or poisoning fits in this case. Cathode poisoning reduces the output of the tube.

Sounds to me like some other component has failed - not a tube. Possibly a filter cap is allowing AC to pass where it shouldn't be getting through. If they used cheap components, heat stress will help identify the weak parts. I'd recommend finding a tech.
#6
I forgot to mention that although it is a tube amp I play with it in "solid state" mode when I am at home to preserve the tubes. Don't know whether or not that makes a difference. I left it on overnight.
#7
Quote by Rotschefeller
I forgot to mention that although it is a tube amp I play with it in "solid state" mode when I am at home to preserve the tubes. Don't know whether or not that makes a difference. I left it on overnight.


Thats only changing the rectifier circuit. it doesn't magically change the amp to a solid state by flipping a switch. its still using its power and preamp tubes regardless of that setting. Granted you really want to be in solid state rectification most of the time unless you play really vintage stuff.
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#8
Maybe one of the valves became microphonic at an accelerated rate? In any case, you're going to need new valves eventually. I'd re-valve it, see if that solves the issue, if not, take it to a tech.
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