#1
First of all, hello.

So the story goes like this, i searched in to a school and now in 16 days i have an audition, all fine and dandy so far BUT i didnt think or rather hoped that they would send the songs in notes.

And as you may understand, i cant read notes for shit.

If there is someone out there who can would you please help a fellow musician out with converting 2 songs from notes or sheet music as i think its called to regular tabs.

If someone sees this i would be extremly happy.
#2
I can do it if you're paying. $25-$100 depending on the length and complexity of the scores.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
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Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#3
Uhm yeah, i'm broke as fudge and since you live in boston i wouldnt be able to pay you anyway but thanks for the kind hearth
#5
Yeah i've checked in to that and yeah, even i can see and hear that it does an extremly bad job unless you pay a shitton of money for it.
#6
Quote by syobdaed
Uhm yeah, i'm broke as fudge and since you live in boston i wouldnt be able to pay you anyway but thanks for the kind hearth

PayPal


think it over

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#7
true true with the paypal thing but sadly to say, i still cant pay you since i dont have any money
#8
Getting back to the topic itself, no one with a kind hearth on this huge site for musicians?
#9
Dude Im sorry I dont have the time to do that. In the 12 hours since you posted this thread even you could have worked these pieces out. All it would take is writing a tab below each line. Then work out each note one at a time and work out where each note could be played. It could take you a while to do this but its your job. I just hope you havent been sitting on your ass for the last 12 hours hping someone would come along and do it for you.

Some kind soul might come a long and do that for you but you cant count on it.

What kind of software do you have? If you have some kind of notation software or even some DAWs like logic will do it for you but you will have to manually input the shee music note for note. I dont know if guitar pro or tux guitar will do it??
Si
#10
TS surely at some point you looked at the eligibility for whatever you're auditioning for. Did you ever see a "can read sheet music" requirement? I ask this because its pretty standard.

I think if you couldn't be bothered learning to read sheet music already, you probably wouldn't enjoy doing a multi year course where it is required to be done constantly.

I can't read sheet music either, but I never had the desire to formally study it either.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
16 days before an audition is when you should be thinking about which shoes to wear. The time to worry about what pieces you'll play and getting the memorized was like 6 months ago.
#12
Honestly, my friend....you're done. I've helped people get into these programs at the "last minute", meaning that we took about 3 months to build these skill sets to make the audition. I've come to call this "panic mode boot camp" because it really is.

Any school worth its salt is going to sus you out and eliminate you. There is too much competition for slots for you to have a fighting chance. Really, you shouldn't get in; you do not have the skill sets or the core faculties to succeed there. That doesnt mean you should give up the dream, but you should start now at developing those skill sets and knowledge to make it through the audition.

That said, DO THE AUDITION. This way you can truly find first hand just what that's like and how far you are from making it - that failure has the potential for kicking you in the butt to take a year or so to develop all the places where you come up short.

Best,

Sean
#13
In reply to this...
Quote by cdgraves
16 days before an audition is when you should be thinking about which shoes to wear. The time to worry about what pieces you'll play and getting the memorized was like 6 months ago.
and this...
Quote by Sean0913
Honestly, my friend....you're done. I've helped people get into these programs at the "last minute", meaning that we took about 3 months to build these skill sets to make the audition. I've come to call this "panic mode boot camp" because it really is.
In reading the OP it is my understanding they just sent him the audition pieces. So he could not have prepared them six months ago or even three months ago. Your points are redundant and needlessly worrying for the poor guy.

From the TS's posts it doesn't seem you could know the school, the course he is applying for, or what criteria the panel will use for their selections. Some big assumptions have been made on your part and in doing so you seem to be deliberately destroying this guys confidence and tearing him down before he's even started.

For all you know he's got mad skills and the pieces are not overly complicated. His only barrier could be his inability to read sheet music. Maybe that is a prerequisite and will disqualify him, or maybe it's not. But as AlanHB pointed out if he doesn't know how to read and/or isn't prepared to learn pretty quickly then he's not going to enjoy this course. Even if he found someone here to tab out the audition pieces he won't have that person in class with him to tab out the musical ideas the teachers might express in notation form as they explain different concepts. He's got to work hard and start now.

p.s. Sean would your school sus him out and eliminate him pretty quickly? Or is your school not worth its salt?
Si
#14
Quote by 20Tigers
In reply to this...and this...In reading the OP it is my understanding they just sent him the audition pieces. So he could not have prepared them six months ago or even three months ago. Your points are redundant and needlessly worrying for the poor guy.

From the TS's posts it doesn't seem you could know the school, the course he is applying for, or what criteria the panel will use for their selections. Some big assumptions have been made on your part and in doing so you seem to be deliberately destroying this guys confidence and tearing him down before he's even started.

For all you know he's got mad skills and the pieces are not overly complicated. His only barrier could be his inability to read sheet music. Maybe that is a prerequisite and will disqualify him, or maybe it's not. But as AlanHB pointed out if he doesn't know how to read and/or isn't prepared to learn pretty quickly then he's not going to enjoy this course. Even if he found someone here to tab out the audition pieces he won't have that person in class with him to tab out the musical ideas the teachers might express in notation form as they explain different concepts. He's got to work hard and start now.

p.s. Sean would your school sus him out and eliminate him pretty quickly? Or is your school not worth its salt?


Hey 20T,

I attempt to help people who are trying to get INTO schools, among other goals.

What I do, as identifying as a school, is a bit different that what the TS is facing. So, no I do not require an audition process, nor would I say that my school is a place "of higher learning".

Furthermore, while I do know how to read music and can teach that skill, it is not needed, as far as what I teach. It would be folly for me to try and measure what I do versus a college - it would be like explaining a jet to people crossing the land in a covered wagon in the year 1800, in the words of one of our students. So, no, what I do, has only one prerequisite; know the notes on the neck, which is the first thing we teach (and it establishes our approach, and my skill sets as a teacher, and allows people to objectively determine the outcome).

I am not a fan of the traditional methods or approaches to teaching, so you'd be comparing apples to oranges if you were to bring what I do into the equation, versus any institution of higher education.

Is it worth it's salt? I'll defer that question to those who have taken us. What I say doesn't matter. The value lies in the results, not my claims.

What you call assumptions, I'd agree with, but I don't think they are off base.

I've personally taught and trained (bootcamped) 7 UG'ers from this very subforum since 2009, that have all sought to get into higher education schools. That's 7 experiences, from on here alone, not including another 5-6 locally. I don't know how many you have. This isn't about you and I, but it demonstrates a corrolary between an assumption made from thin air, versus one based upon a topic that I have direct experience with.

That he doesn't know the piece, isn't the part that's at issue here. That he needs someone to TAB the pieces out, and that he doesn't possess the skill sets to take a piece in sheet music, and do that for himself, is a major indicator of his readiness for such an audition. Having the piece 6 months ago, isn't endemic to this, unless he'd started learning to sightread. A couple of inferences can therefore be drawn here:

1. Usually when a piece is sent in standard notation, it's also the lingua franca of that institution.

2. If he cannot speak that language, he will have a smaller window of chance that he will fare well.

The audition process is, in part designed to select those who have the best chances of success within their program.

While I may "seem" to be "deliberately" destroying the other persons confidence, I assure you there are other possible interpretations of those comments; you just happen to be wrong about yours.

I am sure that you would agree with me, that you have no ability to read into the hearts and minds and intents of others.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Apr 21, 2013,
#15
If I were you, I'd start learning to read standard notation. But because the audition is so soon, translate it into TAB so you have a chance of making it in.
#16
I'll do it but it may take me up to 5 days, but I'll do it for free, PM me
It's not how big your pencil is; it's how you write your name.
#17
Quote by Sean0913
Hey 20T,

I attempt to help people who are trying to get INTO schools, among other goals.

What I do, as identifying as a school, is a bit different that what the TS is facing. So, no I do not require an audition process, nor would I say that my school is a place "of higher learning".

Furthermore, while I do know how to read music and can teach that skill, it is not needed, as far as what I teach. It would be folly for me to try and measure what I do versus a college - it would be like explaining a jet to people crossing the land in a covered wagon in the year 1800, in the words of one of our students. So, no, what I do, has only one prerequisite; know the notes on the neck, which is the first thing we teach (and it establishes our approach, and my skill sets as a teacher, and allows people to objectively determine the outcome).

I am not a fan of the traditional methods or approaches to teaching, so you'd be comparing apples to oranges if you were to bring what I do into the equation, versus any institution of higher education.

Is it worth it's salt? I'll defer that question to those who have taken us. What I say doesn't matter. The value lies in the results, not my claims.

What you call assumptions, I'd agree with, but I don't think they are off base.

I've personally taught and trained (bootcamped) 7 UG'ers from this very subforum since 2009, that have all sought to get into higher education schools. That's 7 experiences, from on here alone, not including another 5-6 locally. I don't know how many you have. This isn't about you and I, but it demonstrates a corrolary between an assumption made from thin air, versus one based upon a topic that I have direct experience with.

That he doesn't know the piece, isn't the part that's at issue here. That he needs someone to TAB the pieces out, and that he doesn't possess the skill sets to take a piece in sheet music, and do that for himself, is a major indicator of his readiness for such an audition. Having the piece 6 months ago, isn't endemic to this, unless he'd started learning to sightread. A couple of inferences can therefore be drawn here:

1. Usually when a piece is sent in standard notation, it's also the lingua franca of that institution.

2. If he cannot speak that language, he will have a smaller window of chance that he will fare well.

The audition process is, in part designed to select those who have the best chances of success within their program.

While I may "seem" to be "deliberately" destroying the other persons confidence, I assure you there are other possible interpretations of those comments; you just happen to be wrong about yours.

I am sure that you would agree with me, that you have no ability to read into the hearts and minds and intents of others.

Best,

Sean

No one can read into the hearts and minds of others, which makes it a weak defense.

However, we can pretty accurately determine someone's intent by examining their words and actions and by considering what effect a reasonable person would expect to achieve through those words or actions.

By telling someone before a try out / audition that they should not get in, that they do not have the skill sets nor the core faculties to succeed, it is reasonable to expect those words to have a rather negative effect on the person's confidence, with little positive benefit.

Would you say the same thing to your own kids? Hey Dad I'm going to try out for the basketball team today. -Well son you should have been practicing for the past three months at least. You don't have the skills or core faculties to succeed in your trial. Any team worth it's salt will sus you out and eliminate you straight away. -But by all means go ahead and try out, it will be a good experience for you.

You don't see how that destroys confidence? You can play the hidden heart and mind card all you want but it's not exactly a trump.

As for the defence of your own school. The point I was making is that your claim was that ANY school worth it's salt would sus him out and eliminate him. If your school would not sus him out and eliminate him for his lack of skills then it is not worth it's salt.

My intent was not to deride your school, only the logic of what I saw as a fairly negative post.

It has already been agreed by a few including myself that this guy needs to learn to read standard notation if he wants to make a real go of this course or other similar courses that use standard notation as a method of communication.

There's a difference between helping the guy out by telling him some hard truths and undermining the guys confidence.
Si
#18
Hey don't many of these schools have a sight-reading component in the auditions too? Or some sort of test where you have to write notation?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#19
20T,

I don't handhold. If he hasn't put in the work to get in, then he shouldn't get in. It's not me that did anything to him. I suggested that he go through the process to understand how much dedication will be needed.

Suffering and failure are great teachers, yes I'd tell my own kids the same thing.

Since you want to cling to that exact term, that I used, in order to make your point, yes I did say "any" as you have so indicated in bold letters above.

Following that logic, let's also agree that I don't audition, ergo, my school isn't worth it's salt.

Let's both agree on that, and put a win mark in your column. My school isn't worth it's salt, on the grounds that I described above. You good with that? OK, let's move on.

Anyways, I think, if you haven't done the work, you shouldn't feel confident that you'll get in. So, I'll agree with that. But that failure can be a catalyst, a teaching tool, a sifting, a time to take things more seriously, if that's what you want. What you see as negative, I see as straight talk. I'm okay with that. Not everything in the world is positive. Nor should be.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Apr 22, 2013,
#20
Quote by Sean0913
Since you want to cling to that exact term, that I used, in order to make your point, yes I did say "any" as you have so indicated in bold letters above.

Following that logic, let's also agree that I don't audition, ergo, my school isn't worth it's salt.

Let's both agree on that, and put a win mark in your column. My school isn't worth it's salt, on the grounds that I described above. You good with that?

Nope. Not the conclusion that I was going for, I would expect you to stand by your school, hence the original eyreoll. The alternative conclusion is that the original argument (any school that doesn't reject him is not worth the investment of time and money required to attend, i.e. it's salt) is false.

He will either be successful on his own merits or fail on his own merits, that is the point of the audition process.

While we might make a statement on the likelihood of his success based on the limited information provided and accounting for assumptions based on experience, its a different thing altogether to say to say he SHOULDN'T be accepted then go on cast aspersions on the school if they decide otherwise.
Si
#21
^^^ 20T the comparison is flawed. Sean's school is not an accredited institution of higher learning. That said, if you were to audition for his school tomorrow, and hadn't learnt the notes of the fretboard, you probably won't get into his school either.

Otherwise the advice above rings true. Im much more for blunt frank advice rather than sugar covered "believe in yourself" crap. It's hard to deny that TS has put himself into quite a position here.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#22
Maybe I'm just too hung up on semantics but took him literally when he said any school. My point was that there may well be schools that are worthwhile, (perhaps even some accredited institutions of higher learning) that would not reject the TS simply because he can't read standard notation. I used his school as a particular example because I thought that he would stand by the value his school had to offer and so understand the point I was trying to make.

There are schools (including accredited institutions of higher learning) that want to assess where a person is at with their reading skills but that don't consider it a qualifying factor.

For all we know if all the other skills are there the panel may accept the TS and, having identified his reading as an issue, ensure his course of study is such that it addresses this weakness as a particular focus.

Is it likely this is the case here? Probably not. We don't have to sugar coat that or give him false hope because that doesn't help anyone. But the thing is we don't really know, and though we don't have to sugar coat it, we don't have to shit coat it either.
Si
#23
Well we can safely assume that this school in particular assumes its applicants possess some level of reading music, otherwise the song wouldn't be in notation. In my experience these schools are of a higher level, leading to a good qualification of some sort.

There are other schools which dont have this requirement that may be more appropriate for TS. TAFE programs in Australia don't have this requirement, Im sure there are equivalents (community colleges?) in the US.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#24
Quote by 20Tigers
Nope. Not the conclusion that I was going for, I would expect you to stand by your school, hence the original eyreoll. The alternative conclusion is that the original argument (any school that doesn't reject him is not worth the investment of time and money required to attend, i.e. it's salt) is false.

He will either be successful on his own merits or fail on his own merits, that is the point of the audition process.

While we might make a statement on the likelihood of his success based on the limited information provided and accounting for assumptions based on experience, its a different thing altogether to say to say he SHOULDN'T be accepted then go on cast aspersions on the school if they decide otherwise.


I do stand by my school. You know full well I've been here since 2009, and if I were a sham or were to have been debunked as such by now, it would have happened. Here we are in 2013, I went from pariah and laughingstock from when I first started here (largely because of my own ignorance about the decorum of forums in general) to respected UG'r in about 6k posts here. I'm content. I know what I am and what I am not; the same with My school. I just wasn't going to worry about semantics.

I'll agree with the majority of your post above, and, say that none of my statements should be taken as dogma, divine law, or absolutionist in nature, but rather one guy's opinion.

Your argument above is sound, and makes a lot of sense. He will rise and fall on his own merits, that is true. You sound like you've been experienced in debate; I've never felt passionate enough about most topics to give a damn about winning arguments concerning them

Best,

Sean
#25
Quote by Sean0913
I do stand by my school. You know full well I've been here since 2009, ...Here we are in 2013, I went from pariah and laughingstock from when I first started here (largely because of my own ignorance about the decorum of forums in general) to respected UG'r in about 6k posts here.

I don't know about laughing stock and I don't know if it was a widespread opinion. I came at you pretty hard early on but agree you've been a great contributer here in MT and I can't speak for everyone but you have my respect.

Yeah I do enjoy an argument from time to time - but only with a worthy opponent.
Si
#26
Most colleges/universities require a performance audition where you may or may not need to show them your music. If you can play it from memory, is there really any value in bringing it along? (save for a memory blackout in the middle...

But most also require a sight reading component too. If he can't sight-read at all, he really is out of luck for MOST higher education programs.

Note that the OP hasn't weighed in yet on what the audition requirements actually are, which leaves anyone in this argument guessing or firing away at generalities.

That all said, I didn't get in my first year either. I got permission of the department to take a lot of the required courses, though, and worked like hell and got in the next year.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#27
Quote by AlanHB
^^^ 20T the comparison is flawed. Sean's school is not an accredited institution of higher learning. That said, if you were to audition for his school tomorrow, and hadn't learnt the notes of the fretboard, you probably won't get into his school either.

Otherwise the advice above rings true. Im much more for blunt frank advice rather than sugar covered "believe in yourself" crap. It's hard to deny that TS has put himself into quite a position here.


Alan, great points. I spend too much time running my school to defend it, but you're right, it's not accredited nor would I represent it as such. What made me call it it a school, as opposed to just online lessons, is the breadth and depth of the course content and our approach to tackling these problems are entirely original. I mean, the closest thing to it, content wise, online, would be Berklee, that I know of, without the high cost, marquee faculty, and CST approach to Modes!



Regarding the Notes on the Neck as a requirement or prerequisite for everything else I teach, if I may, address that, because I don't think I've ever shared this publicly since I've been coming here.

While you're right, someone wouldn't get into my school, that didn't know the notes on the neck, I do teach that as the first course, because it's not JUST a matter of knowing the notes on the neck, it's the access and SPEED of knowing them, that's also important.

If you can't say, find Eb on the 3rd string within 2 seconds or less, then by our standards, you DON'T know the Notes on the Neck to a proficiency to where you can hang and do the rest of the more advanced stuff that I teach or will ask of you. The Notes on the Neck course that we do teach, is to not only prove we can teach someone new that skill set in 6 lessons, but to get them to THAT level of proficiency, so they CAN succeed.

For example, MT'ers:

Try this on for size: I want you to assess a 6 or 7 note chord, omit the root and 5th and map out the chord tones of the rest in a 4 note "block", prioritizing the 11th extension in the melody or highest voice. Your chord, is Bb min 11.

If you stumble around all day with brain freeze because you had to count from the nut and go through your alphabet to "find" a note on the neck, it's because you can't SEE the neck in real time.

To do so requires a legitimate skill set. How many people here (aside from those who are thoroughly established MT'ers who don't need what we teach anyways) can do this?

Unless you first know that the notes of the chord, say Bb min 11, instantly, then you cannot claim or duplicate what I teach others to be able to do in real time:

Here's one possible answer as we (an Academy student) might approach it:

First of all, we know the notes, Bb Db F Ab C and Eb - time to evaluate, less than a second

Db Ab C and Eb - subtraction, less than a second. Extracted my essential chord building tones. One could argue that I could also omit the 9th, however, I'm keeping it there for balance and color, but I'd agree it isn't essential.

In 2 seconds consideration, I'm ready to build my chord on the fret board.

Db 5th string 4th fret D is my Min 3rd
Ab 4th string 6th fret Ab is my b7
C 3rd string 5th fret C is my 9
Eb 2nd string 4th fret Eb is my 11

x 4 6 5 4 x

Time to find/map that... maybe 2 seconds, but now I have a Bb min 11 voicing without a root or 5th.

Why might I have wanted this chord? Because in most cases, in a band or ensemble the bass or piano has the root already covered. It's simply being efficient.

That short example, is WHY we require and teach the Notes on the Neck, Triads, scales, etc to proficiency. Because we not only want the student to know it, but to USE it in real time. Can you imagine how you'd put theory to use, if you didn't know the neck?

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Apr 24, 2013,
#28
I agree with Sean0913, since OP hasn't chimed in to defend his/her abilities and all we have to go on is that he/she is learning their music 16 days in advance and cant read music...at a music school...to study music...which is notated...That's kind of on the unacceptable side
#29
Hello and thanks for all the responses this thread got. Been busey with work, school and recently starting up a band.

To begin with point 1 : yes i got in, no i did never learned to read the notation in time, instead i just played the music.

2 : Yes i am working on my note reading skills ( even though it goes kinda slow )

3: No, the school did not specify that notation was needed but with most music schools here in sweden they dont send out the songs in tab form unless it is for elementry school.

4: Sean, i dont know what you have done in the UG Community and i do not know of your other work BUT i will say this, I belive that you are good at what you do but the way you presented your argument in the beginning was just snobby.

5: I was desperat man, remember that.

Love Syobdead.
Last edited by syobdaed at Dec 9, 2013,