#1
Hey guys, I'm getting confused about counting intervals. If I start on B with 1, then I should end the next B with an 8 (octave) right? But for some reason my counting doesn't add up to an 8/octave.

Let me take the B and A chords as examples.
In my chord book the B chord is listed as B (prime/1), D# (3), F# (5)
This is what I get when counting: B(1) C#(2) D#(3) F(4) G(5) A(6) B(7).

In example 2, the A chord is listed in my book as A (prime/1), C#(3), E(5).
This is what I get when counting: A(1) B(2) C#(3) D#(4) F(5) G(6) A(7).

So how come my counting doesn't add up to the counting of my chord book? I'm I doing something wrong?

Any help would be appreciated.
#2
I'm not quite sure what method you're using to count intervals, but are you sure that you aren't skipping any notes?

Edit: FYI you aren't counting intervals; you're counting scale degrees. That explains my initial confusion...
Last edited by E7#9 at Apr 18, 2013,
#3
When you're counting, it looks like you're completely skipping the E note.
#4
Quote by Apogga
When you're counting, it looks like you're completely skipping the E note.


this
#5
Quote by ArtistLion
Hey guys, I'm getting confused about counting intervals. If I start on B with 1, then I should end the next B with an 8 (octave) right? But for some reason my counting doesn't add up to an 8/octave.

Let me take the B and A chords as examples.
In my chord book the B chord is listed as B (prime/1), D# (3), F# (5)
This is what I get when counting: B(1) C#(2) D#(3) F(4) G(5) A(6) B(7).

In example 2, the A chord is listed in my book as A (prime/1), C#(3), E(5).
This is what I get when counting: A(1) B(2) C#(3) D#(4) F(5) G(6) A(7).

So how come my counting doesn't add up to the counting of my chord book? I'm I doing something wrong?

Any help would be appreciated.

You forgot E. If you remember the alphabet, you remember the note names. A B C D E F G. Those are all note names. Then you can add sharps and flats. The easiest way to count intervals would be using a scale. For example if you are in B major, the scale is B (1), C# (2), D# (3), E (4), F# (5), G# (6), A# (7). If it is a minor chord, just use a minor scale to count the intervals. This is not the best way to do it but I think it's the easiest way to do it. A better way would be learning the chromatic scale and using that to count intervals.

Seems like you are counting using whole tones. Remember that there's a semitone between B - C and E - F. A perfect fifth is only 3 and a half tones (A - E), not four (A - F).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Quote by ArtistLion
I thought intervals and scale degrees were the same thing :S


Not quite, interval is a generic term for the distance between any 2 notes whereas a scale degree is a note contained within a particular scale that is a certain distance from the tonic. Scale degrees are intervals, but not all intervals are scale degrees if the interval is not contained in the scale you're looking at.

Ex: a minor 3rd is a very common interval, but is not a scale degree of the major scale. It is however a scale degree of the natural minor scale.
I'm an
Engeneer
Enginear
Enginere

I'm Good at Math
Last edited by J-Dawg158 at Apr 18, 2013,
#8
I presume the book is referring to the major scale. The intervals for the major are W,W,H,W,W,W,H. W means whole step (2 frets) and H means half step (1 fret).

So for the first example to go from B to B, it would be B, C#,D#,E,F#,G#,A#,B

In the second example to go from A to A, it would be A,B,C#,D,E,F#,G#,A

Therefore your book is correct. Hope this helps
#9
Quote by ArtistLion
Hey guys, I'm getting confused about counting intervals. If I start on B with 1, then I should end the next B with an 8 (octave) right? But for some reason my counting doesn't add up to an 8/octave.

Let me take the B and A chords as examples.
In my chord book the B chord is listed as B (prime/1), D# (3), F# (5)
This is what I get when counting: B(1) C#(2) D#(3) F(4) G(5) A(6) B(7).

In example 2, the A chord is listed in my book as A (prime/1), C#(3), E(5).
This is what I get when counting: A(1) B(2) C#(3) D#(4) F(5) G(6) A(7).

So how come my counting doesn't add up to the counting of my chord book? I'm I doing something wrong?

Any help would be appreciated.



What was said before about skipping E x3

Included in the naming (and really, understanding) of intervals is their quality as well as their number value. Quality refers to the terms major, minor, augmented and diminished. To understand how this all ties together in naming chords you really need to study intervals more, including compound (more than an octave) and inverted intervals.

Good Luck
#10
Quote by ArtistLion
Hey guys, I'm getting confused about counting intervals. If I start on B with 1, then I should end the next B with an 8 (octave) right? But for some reason my counting doesn't add up to an 8/octave.

Let me take the B and A chords as examples.
In my chord book the B chord is listed as B (prime/1), D# (3), F# (5)
This is what I get when counting: B(1) C#(2) D#(3) F(4) G(5) A(6) B(7).

In example 2, the A chord is listed in my book as A (prime/1), C#(3), E(5).
This is what I get when counting: A(1) B(2) C#(3) D#(4) F(5) G(6) A(7).

So how come my counting doesn't add up to the counting of my chord book? I'm I doing something wrong?

Any help would be appreciated.


Where's your E?

Best,

Sean