#1
Hello, pardon my noobish question here. Just something I'm wondering about and I hope you guys can help me out.

I was playing around combining the major, minor pentatonic, dorian and blues scales together, and I ended up with this terrible fretboard pic in MS Paint. If I were to extend it across the fretboard, wouldn't that cover just about every note? So when one improvises, is it then theoretically correct to use any one of those notes?

Thanks!
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#3
Most music is based on the major or minor scales with out of scale notes, called accidentals, thrown in. Not all notes played have to be in a scale. Take the blues scale. It's really just the minor pentatonic scale with a b5 passing tone. There's really no need to think of it as it's own scale, but people have a habit of relating everything to a set scale when it just isn't necessary.
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#4
Yeah you can use any notes combination and it can theoretically be correct some how. Just like you can use any color combinations when you are painting a picture.
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#5
THeory isn't rules. It's always "theoretically okay."

But your music will improve if you stop thinking of music as a collection of interchangeable notes, but rather begin to learn to hear the individual relationship each note has to your key center.

Because then you don't need to be afraid of outside notes, you'll just know that they're notes with a different type of relationship to your tonic, and when you want to use that relationship, you'll be able to.
#7
There are no limits. Scales are to help beginners have some fun things to mess around without sounding so horrible (you must know how to use accidentals for them to sound good).

What I just just is very wrong in a lot of ways, but also quite right in a lot of ways. Anyone who disagrees, challenge me. I shall smite thee.
#9
Why don't you just add 2 notes and end up with the chromatic scale?

Seriously though, it's not helping any thing to think of this pattern. What you need to do is start thinking about how melody notes relate to the chords under them rather than trying to figure out the right scale.
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#10
Quote by food1010
Why don't you just add 2 notes and end up with the chromatic scale?

Seriously though, it's not helping any thing to think of this pattern. What you need to do is start thinking about how melody notes relate to the chords under them rather than trying to figure out the right scale.


This makes sense. I know one plays the notes that would fit with the chords in the song, all I was trying to find out if its true that just about every note is a valid one given that you can justify it (as Jacques-Henri said).
#11
To sum up - listen more, look less

Play with your ears, not your eyes. If you're solely approaching the fretboard from a visual persepctive then you can come to all sorts of conclusions regarding patterns, shapes and sequences of dots - but ultimately all that "information" is both meaningless and useless to you unless you're also listening to the sounds you're making and making the effort to tie them in with the actions you're performing.
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#12
Yes, every single note can be justified in some way or another. Worry less about finding notes that can be justified and worry more about justifying the note choices that you make.

What this means in a more applicable sense is that you need to develop your aural vocabulary so that your note choice is intentional, or better yet, intuitive.

To add to what steven seagull wrote, there are many resources online for developing your ear (miles.be and musictheory.net are two off the top of my head), but one of the best ways is to transcribe music. By listening to something and figuring out where the notes are on the fretboard you are creating a mental connection between the sounds you hear and the physical position of these notes on your instrument.

Another thing to do is to learn to sing, if you don't already. Singing is a great way to internalize melody because not only do you hear it superficially, your brain has to process the sounds and unconsciously determine the intervals.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea