#1
I'm primarily a guitarist but I played bass briefly in high school while I was with the band at church and I really enjoyed it but when I left the band I pretty much quit and sold my bass to a friend. But now I'm thinking about picking it up again.

My question isn't really what's the best bass because I know since I play strats I want something from fender.

It's more should I go with a precision or a jazz bass, what's a good amp and what else do I need? (like do I need pedals and all that?)

My main influences are clapton, arctic monkeys and Paramore. And I don't really want to go used.

Budget is not really an issue since I'm going to save and eat hot pockets for the next few weeks to finance it. Though I would like to keep it fairly low, and amp wise I don't need to blow the house down. Just something to practice with that will sound good
#2
if you want something along the lines of fender, look at the vm jazz - or p - from squier. their basses are held to a higher regard than their guitars from what i've heard. they are even comparable or perhaps even better than the mexican made fenders.
as for amps check the faq at the top its pretty comprehensive of the best 'beginner' amps. only go for pedals if you want to, they aren't a necessity - unless you are playing some crazy synthyfuzzwubs (or if you forget to remove them from your basket online and don't bother to check the price
DONT RISK IT, BUY A BASS AMP
#3
Quote by rander7917
I'm primarily a guitarist but I played bass briefly in high school while I was with the band at church and I really enjoyed it but when I left the band I pretty much quit and sold my bass to a friend. But now I'm thinking about picking it up again.

My question isn't really what's the best bass because I know since I play strats I want something from fender.

It's more should I go with a precision or a jazz bass, what's a good amp and what else do I need? (like do I need pedals and all that?)

My main influences are clapton, arctic monkeys and Paramore. And I don't really want to go used.

Budget is not really an issue since I'm going to save and eat hot pockets for the next few weeks to finance it. Though I would like to keep it fairly low, and amp wise I don't need to blow the house down. Just something to practice with that will sound good



It's your bat and your ball....but....go used.

Why would you not?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#4
I know the benefits of going used but I really would like to be the first one to own the instrument. The amp I don't mind going used on though it's gonna be from a reputable source like guitar center.

I know this is a strange way to look at it but I kind of see my guitars as canvases and I don't want someone else to have already painted on it (at least for ones I know I'm gonna play a lot)

I really don't want to go squire for the purely vain reason that I want the fender name on the headstock. I know it's kind of ridiculous but I'm doing pretty good for myself and I want to treat myself to it
#5
Well... Precision vs Jazz is about preference. Both will fit whatever music well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-BIBu-LUMc

I like both but that Precision sound is just so awesome. I guess I'm more of a Precision guy. But both are really cool sounding basses.

I think you should look at amps that you can use for jamming with a band, even if you didn't have a band at the moment. You can always turn it down but you can never turn it past the maximum volume. People say that you need at least 100 watts to play with a band (of course you can do it with less but you might not have any clean headroom left and it will not sound good). I'm sure there are lots of cheap and decent used bass amps. I think used Peavey amps (from the 70s-early 90s) are pretty cheap. People say that they are built like tanks.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
I use a jazz bass. Order one online and you have more variety of colors. I really don't know that much about basses other than I played some at guitar center to find one I liked. One thing I noticed is they have different kinds of neck shapes or roundness on the neck. You have to find the one that fits the cup of your hand. I play bass as well as guitar because bass is such an in demand instrument. If I had to get another bass, I'd get a Hofner. Just a few more bucks but plays just like a guitar. Just don't play it like too much like a guitar or you won't sound like a good bassist.
Last edited by ElliottJeffries at Apr 20, 2013,
#7
Go play a bunch of bass's (they now grow like banana's) in a shop. See what feels best. In the end a jazz and a precision can both be used in the same settings. I find different sized necks along with where i anchor my right hand effect and influence my groove so its always worth seeing what suits you.

If you want to gig, id say most times a 1x12 cab and a 300 watt head will do especially if there's a PA. Ashdown, aguilar, gk, markbass, hartke, ampeg and a million others will do.

I dont know what a hot pocket is but it doesnt sound good to live off. Throw in a couple of oranges and a sweet potato and id say youll be good.
Yamaha TRB1006
Fender MIA jazz bass
Hora Hybrid double bass
Hartke lh 500
Ev 606L
Epiphone les paul
#8
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Well... Precision vs Jazz is about preference. Both will fit whatever music well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-BIBu-LUMc

I like both but that Precision sound is just so awesome. I guess I'm more of a Precision guy. But both are really cool sounding basses.

I think you should look at amps that you can use for jamming with a band, even if you didn't have a band at the moment. You can always turn it down but you can never turn it past the maximum volume. People say that you need at least 100 watts to play with a band (of course you can do it with less but you might not have any clean headroom left and it will not sound good). I'm sure there are lots of cheap and decent used bass amps. I think used Peavey amps (from the 70s-early 90s) are pretty cheap. People say that they are built like tanks.



hey thanks man i found a pretty good sounding peavy 150w amp in a pawn shop today, i put 40 down on it for layaway. and im pretty sure im gonna go with the fender mexican standard precision bass. i played both today at a local shop and the neck and the body of the p-bass felt more a strat.


ElliottJeffries

i know the feeling it seems like every band around here has a guitar player and needs a bass or everyone that "plays" bass around here doesnt really have any musical talent, they just picked it up because it seemed like it would be the easiest to play.

the reason why i enjoy it so much though is i'm realy energetic on stage and i feel like the simplicity of the bass(i mean nothing bad by that) gives me the ability to express more, because when im playing guitar on stage i often have to sacrifice stage presence for playing accuracy. beleive me it's difficult to play some with perfect precision when your jumping around like a 4-year old that just found where his mom hid all the Halloween candy lol
#9
^ I think you need to play bass more accurately than guitar to sound good. If bass isn't accurate, it's kind of the same as if drums aren't accurate. Bass parts can be simple and they can be complex (of course depends on the music you play). But don't underrate the necessity of bass. Bass is about groove and the rhythms might be much more complicated than on guitar. But yeah, you are right that if the song has a simple 8th beat, it's a lot easier to play the bass than the guitar. And yeah, there's nothing wrong with simple basslines. As long as it supports the music it's good.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
^ I think you need to play bass more accurately than guitar to sound good. If bass isn't accurate, it's kind of the same as if drums aren't accurate. Bass parts can be simple and they can be complex (of course depends on the music you play). But don't underrate the necessity of bass. Bass is about groove and the rhythms might be much more complicated than on guitar. But yeah, you are right that if the song has a simple 8th beat, it's a lot easier to play the bass than the guitar. And yeah, there's nothing wrong with simple basslines. As long as it supports the music it's good.



Oh no I'm not underrating it at all I'm just saying that typically the stuff you do with the fretting hand is far less complex than that of a guitar. I know the bass falls in the same low end as the drums and carries the rhythm . I have really good rhythm, and have no problem strumming the guitar accurately when on stage. It's the other hand I have to to fight with.
#12
Quote by Spaz91
Get a Squier Vintage Modified or Classic Vibe. Unless you're going to get MIA, there's not point buying a Fender.

I used to think like that, but I found that The mexican reissues are good value, and the american Special are not... :S Still, I think that mexican standards are overpriced, and a Squier can (for me it definetly does) sound/play better, and cost less.
Quote by FatalGear41
When you break a bass string, that snapping sound is the sound of six dollars going down the crapper.



Sterling Ray 35
Hartke Ha3500 head - Gallien Krueger 212MBE cab
Tech 21 VT Bass
Zoom b2
#13
Good luck in finding your way through the maze of Fender/Squire's offerings at the moment. their policy of offering a model at every price point is baffling to me. Their product control seems to be a bit haphazard as well, especially for the MIA models. Squires are very consistently made and the Mexican ones seem more consistent than the USA models. Don't go mail order and do try before you buy, there are definitely good and bad ones coming out of the production line.

I'm not a tone freak and I like the 'all-purpose' sound of the precision but I have small hands and the jazz neck suits me. I didn't think I was a Fender man but I tried a Highway Jazz (cheapest MIA) in a shop and it just felt right. Plugged it in and it sounded great. I bought it. You can see why it is cheaper, the neck has a couple of tiny knots in it, enough to mar the finish but not big enough to cause any sound or stability problems, and the finish is just nitro (spray painted) which looks great but marks easily. The Roadworn series are getting great reviews on Basschat and Talkbass at the moment, I tried one last week and they do feel good though I'm not sure I'd want a guitar with the paint rubbed off before I play it.

I'd say don't be put off by the MIA/MIM/Squire labels, just go for what plays and sounds well.
#14
I dunno man. I can't speak for the vintage modified squires but I've had a squire that played great and sounded awesome. But wasn't built very durable.

That other than what I mentioned earlier kind of put me off from squire.

My requirements for a bass are the same as the guitar

1 a name I can be proud of
2 a good feel
3 a good sound
4 built like a tank (I'm really rough on guitars I want something that can handle everything from dings and dents to being dropped multiple times
#15
Quote by rander7917
I dunno man. I can't speak for the vintage modified squires but I've had a squire that played great and sounded awesome. But wasn't built very durable.

Then don't hit things with it.
#16
Built like a tank = Peavey
Quote by FatalGear41
Bassists don't hover on the forum day and night like guitarists. We've got lives to lead, music to play and whiskey to drink.

Quote by Ziphoblat
I'd rather go at my hands with a hacksaw than play lead guitar, and I'm only slightly exaggerating.
#17
Quote by GAPendragon
Built like a tank = Peavey



This and if you can land and older Epiphone model. Though both can be heavy as frick.
#18
Spaz : or I could buy a more durable instrument lol ill most likely go with a mim fender. I know their expensive but I'm pretty sure my mim strats could survive a bomb going off


Pendragon : yeah lol like I said earlier I put some cash down on a peavey amp at a pawn shop it sounds good and I like that they are known for being tough

And anarkee I tried a few Gibsons and epiphones and they all sounded great, but just felt wrong lol. I'm just too attached to fender lol
#19
Quote by rander7917
Spaz : or I could buy a more durable instrument lol ill most likely go with a mim fender. I know their expensive but I'm pretty sure my mim strats could survive a bomb going off.

Wood is wood. If you think that Fender use some sort of super strength wood, screws and solder then you're having a laugh.
#20
Quote by rander7917
Spaz : or I could buy a more durable instrument lol ill most likely go with a mim fender. I know their expensive but I'm pretty sure my mim strats could survive a bomb going off

I sincerely think you won't find a great deal of difference between the durability of one of the nicer Squiers (VM and CV) and an MIM Fender. The hardware isn't any noticeably sturdier on an MIM (and Classic Vibe Squiers actually have nicer bridges), neither one has graphite reinforcement in the necks, and while the body woods on the Squiers may be different (basswood, agathis, and soft maple on VM's and CV's) both Squiers and MIM's have thick poly finishes and if you're actually managing to tear through the finish and take out chunks of wood then you must be severely mistreating your bass.

If you go MIM, go used and at least save some money. I know you said you don't want to but used you'll pay 50% of what you'll pay new. If you're willing to buy a new MIM, then you might as well spend just a little bit more and get a used MIA.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#21
Durability depends on construction. Squier typically use the same dimensions etc as Fender and will consequently be more or less equally durable, and really if you look after your equipment that's a non-issue anyway. Look at Les Paul's as an example, they decided to reinforce the neck with two truss rods, what that means is that at the nut where the neck is thinnest there's barely any wood left because of the space taken up by the truss rod, and consequently they're prone to headstock breaks (applies to a lot of Gibson designs). My guitarist dropped his Gibson Les Paul once from standing height and the headstock came clean off. You could probably smash somebody around the face with a Fender design and it'll still be in tune. I really wouldn't worry about durability with Squier.
Spare a Cow
Eat a Vegan
#22
Nice analogy mate lol. I'm gonna try out the vintage modified squires but I'm really not sure.

Tbh I'll probably go with the fender but the telecaster bass intrigues me. I may go with a squire just so I can get the tele as well. Lol
#24
Honestly I really don't like the look of either one I want a maple fretboard but I don't really like the only style of bass it comes on. I also don't like the color options either.

Classic vibe is a definite no. I want something I like to look at. Can you blame me?
#25
I suppose not. The VM '77 Jazz and VM Mustang are both really nice with maple boards. Short scale is something you might want to consider if you're a guitar player, I know switching between scales ****s with me.

If you're going to a shop to try things out then I'm sure you'll make the right couice. Just promise us that you won't pay an extra £200 simply for a name.
#26
No that won't be the only reason if I pay the extra 200 it won't be just for that. There will be other reasons. Hell I don't know I might even pay an extra 5 for an American.

I was looking at the 77 jazz and was just about to mention it. May try it out tomorrow before work
#27
I also really like the black pickguard on white from the vintage modified even if I prefer maple boards. I'll give it a shot