#1
Which scales should I start learning in order to play solos etc.?

I know I should know most of them but from which scales should I begin?

Link me with some Video Tutorials maybe?
#2
Which scales should I start learning in order to play solos etc.?

Consider a different approach. Scales are just notes defined by intervals. To claim "I know most of them (scales)" but not understand how this relates to their use doesn't make sense. I would assume you know some shapes on the fretboard used to play scales, but this isn't understanding.
Last edited by _LoveFuzz_ at Apr 22, 2013,
#3
Quote by _LoveFuzz_
Consider a different approach.


This. But if you want the bog-standard response, your major and minor pentatonics are the basis of most blues and rock solos.
#4
There are three scales you should start to learn, major, major pentatonic and minor pentatonic. Learn the patterns to move up and down the neck.There is much more information on scales but to begin start by looking at scale charts. This link will get you started.
http://www.chordbook.com/guitarscales.php
#5
I kinda agree with above poster that you should learn the major/minors... but if I could go back in time and change the way I learned things I'd definitely learn the notes on the fretboard first.
If you know them, then the scales and patterns will make a lot more sense to you.
I know this is boring and time consuming, so I understand if you don't want to take that approach...but I'm just throwing it out there.
Things with strings:
Ibanez J.Custom, Prestiges, RG8, SR5 bass etc
LP's, Strat, Tele
Noiseboxes:
ENGL Retro Tube 50
5150 III 50W
Orange Terror Bass
#6
Quote by Karan1best
Which scales should I start learning in order to play solos etc.?

I know I should know most of them but from which scales should I begin?

If you want to start learning solos, learn some solos. If you want to write your own solos, it depends entirely on what you want to play. Most guitar music is based on major and minor pentatonic and diatonic scales. Those are good places to start. Don't worry about memorizing scales; memorize intervals so that you can construct scales. Then just learn how to find any given note on the fretboard so that you can construct any scale any time while playing.
#9
Thank you guys! You guys helped me a lot! I'll begin with learning all the notes on the fret and All major and minor pentatonic scales.

@LoveFuzz - I did not say "I know" them I said "I should know them" :P
#10
Quote by Karan1best
Thank you guys! You guys helped me a lot! I'll begin with learning all the notes on the fret and All major and minor pentatonic scales.

@LoveFuzz - I did not say "I know" them I said "I should know them" :P


Hi Karan

I wrote a short article about this here
http://www.guitarlessonsbristol.org.uk/1/post/2012/08/what-are-guitar-scales.html

It explains a bit about the two most commonly used scales on the guitar - the major scale and the minor pentatonic.

They are the best to start with.

If you get into learning the notes on the fretboard I have a great way of doing this that I use on the Technical Training course I run. Private message me when you get to this stage and I will send you some details. I would recommend getting used to one key first, and learning to apply the scale.

For the minor pentatonic, which is used a lot in blues and rock, I would really recommend 'Blues you can use' by John Ganapes. It's a fantastic book that really integrates the theory with the playing, and has some great pieces.

Luke Mosse
Luke Mosse Guitar Teacher in Bristol, UK
#11
Learn some functional harmony. Learn how to make one of the twelve notes tonic. Then learn how all the notes relate to that tonic. That is a lot more useful then scales IMO.
#12
All of them - it's not very hard. There are only 12 diatonic scales and a couple of non-diatonic ones, and everything else is just a variation or re-ordering of those. Learn those up and down the fretboard and your fingers will be ready for almost any scale-based thing you want to play.

The hard part is understanding why those scales exist, how they work in action, how to use them analytically, and how to derive them from harmonic relationships.
Last edited by cdgraves at Apr 23, 2013,
#13
Quote by Karan1best
Which scales should I start learning in order to play solos etc.?

I know I should know most of them but from which scales should I begin?

Link me with some Video Tutorials maybe?

Ideally you want to learn what makes a scale by learning the intervals for different types of scales and variations from the traditional major/minor types of scales so you can play w.e you want in any key. That being said, for piano I played a lot of F# Minor and also A minor when I was starting out . A minor is great on piano because it's the same notes as C Major, just with a different root note - hence different intervals and a different sound.