MagnusGautestad
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
32 IQ
#1
This concept is so simple and genius , and really common sense if you think about it, that I wanted to share it :

Play something : Observe what your mind first think about. Write down that first thought. That thought is a barrier for feeling the music, and needs to be removed (if your goal is to express yourself freely). Isolate that one thing, solve it, and move on.

The awesome stuff about this is that you know what to practice (the first thought), and what order ( first thought is what you need to remove first )

Example : You improvise. The first thought you come up with is " the playing is sloppy, the notes are covered by noise". Then you know what to sit down and isolate.

This is the key masters do consciously or unconsciously.

Good practice.
Stop doing anything you do not do with passion, and start doing everything you do with passion
crazysam23_Atax
Feuergesicht
Join date: Oct 2009
5,710 IQ
#2
Um...ok, this is great. But it doesn't really mean a whole lot in a practical sense. I'm glad it works for you though.
MagnusGautestad
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2013
32 IQ
#3
Mh, how can I explain it more simple. When you have several issues you want to work on, it is often uncertain what issue is most efficient to start at. Is is like if you slay through the first thought that comes up, it will often help solve some of the other issues too if you do it in the order the mind brings focus to first.

A way to make it practical is to simply write down what you need to think about (identify problems), and then go to your teacher, or the internet, to find solutions to that specific problem.
Stop doing anything you do not do with passion, and start doing everything you do with passion
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#6
this is sheer common sense lol of course you're constantly editing your technique and craft. i thought this all got covered around the same time as "economy of motion" in picking technique 2 weeks into lessons
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chrisball
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2013
11 IQ
#7
Yeah, I think what Magnus is trying to say is we often procrastinate improving things in our guitar playing, even when, if we start playing something, we can intuitively recognize what is currently limiting us the most from doing what we want to be able to do. We often fail to act on that intuition and as a result may practice predetermined things that aren't necessarily a high priority to us at the moment as they don't address what is currently holding us back the most when we play.

For example, a typical guitarist learns a few pentatonic scale patterns and then starts improvising, lets say in Am. The guitarist immediately realizes (and thinks to themselves) they know the pattern quite well at the 5th fret, and maybe at the 12th fret, but they don't feel confident in moving to the other three patterns (3rd fret, 8th fret, 10th fret) not to mention the repeated patterns an octave higher. As soon as the guitarist realizes this, they have just identified what they should be practicing and learning: those other scale patterns. Once the guitarist learns these, they start improvising again. They then start thinking that they don't feel confident moving back and forth between each pattern once they are in a particular position. They then stop freely improvising and focus on moving back and forth between each pair of adjacent patterns, thus improving their knowledge of and ability to play pentatonic scales over the fretboard. The process continues and the guitarist thinks something else is now holding them back so they stop to focus on that. In each case the guitarist is isolate what is restricting them first and foremost and then focusing on improving in that area to reduce the burdens that keep the guitarist from freely expressing themselves. Eventually they will continue to move these burdens and as they do, they become freer and more expressive with their playing.

This might seem obvious and common sense to most people, and that's because it is. Remember, what is common sense is not always common practice. For example, I bet many guitarists would just keep doodling away with the two patterns they already know.
evolucian
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2008
682 IQ
#8
Quote by Hail
this is sheer common sense lol of course you're constantly editing your technique and craft. i thought this all got covered around the same time as "economy of motion" in picking technique 2 weeks into lessons

You had economy of motion taught to you in your 2nd week? Fark!!!! Thats hectic. Sit on my lap
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#9
Quote by evolucian
You had economy of motion taught to you in your 2nd week? Fark!!!! Thats hectic. Sit on my lap




granted it's a process, but economy of motion is something that needs to be emphasized in the basics and improved upon as you learn. otherwise picking and fretting are going to be a nightmare. poor technique and posture build up habits that are be damn hard to shake off
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Hail killed MT

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evolucian
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2008
682 IQ
#10
^ Nah, I have different methods of teaching it. True economy only happens later - so its stages are taught in the beginning. Never the whole big shabang in the beginning (let alone week 2) as it can be extremely overwhelming and detrimental. I agree on posture but not technique. The student gets a bit of basics but inherently has his own picking style to develop before one can properly assess which style would be his strong suit and which would be a severe weakness to boost.

Of course I'd emphasise decreasing flams as much as possible, but that alone takes quite a while (especially with people who nod in agreement and do it on the very next example again... grrrrrrrr). But if you did it in week 2 and survived, then its ok... but then again, look at your mental state. Your teacher messed you up. Give credit where its due buddy, lol.
Last edited by evolucian at May 3, 2013,
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#11
poor technique makes for tendinitis, i'm not talking about flailing at a metronome but a kid should know not to pick from his elbow or wrap his thumb around the low E. economy of motion just means moving as little as possible, and most of that comes from sitting correctly and holding a plectrum and the fretboard with a set of basic principles

i can live with my scat-covered walls as long as i can play the get-tar real perty
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Hail killed MT

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I want to be Hail when I grow up.
evolucian
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2008
682 IQ
#12
Yeah, but minimal movement only happens in time. Lots of time at that. Sadly my students see me cradle my neck and reckon they can get away with it. Short lived but thats nazi 101 shop talk for another day.
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#13
well nothing's learned overnight, it's a constantly evolving system you've got to pay attention to actively. hence why i likened it to this liberal hippy TS's slander and lies
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

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I want to be Hail when I grow up.
evolucian
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2008
682 IQ
#14
lol @ liberal hippy's slander and lies. Almost seems like a Jung/Freud approach to guitar but yeah... it works for him. You're just jealous cos you didn't type it first... pffft
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#15
i'll show you a freudian approach to guitar
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Hail killed MT

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I want to be Hail when I grow up.
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
288 IQ
#16
Quote by MagnusGautestad
This concept is so simple and genius , and really common sense if you think about it, that I wanted to share it :

Play something : Observe what your mind first think about. Write down that first thought. That thought is a barrier for feeling the music, and needs to be removed (if your goal is to express yourself freely). Isolate that one thing, solve it, and move on.

The awesome stuff about this is that you know what to practice (the first thought), and what order ( first thought is what you need to remove first )

Example : You improvise. The first thought you come up with is " the playing is sloppy, the notes are covered by noise". Then you know what to sit down and isolate.

This is the key masters do consciously or unconsciously.

Good practice.
I there a question in there somewhere? Cos' if not, then this needs to be relegated to a blog....elsewhere.......Maybe the editorial page of "High Times".

Do they still print that....?
sweetdude3000
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2012
1,172 IQ
#17
So this guy is saying you subconsciously realize what you are sucking at the most and the next step to advance in your goals is to tackle that problem rather than being lazy about it. I think it makes sense bc it is easy to fall into the trap of playing the easy stuff over and over instead of tackling your weaknesses
Slashiepie
Banged
Join date: Apr 2011
492 IQ
#18
Quote by MagnusGautestad
This concept is so simple and genius , and really common sense if you think about it, that I wanted to share it :

Play something : Observe what your mind first think about. Write down that first thought. That thought is a barrier for feeling the music, and needs to be removed (if your goal is to express yourself freely). Isolate that one thing, solve it, and move on.

The awesome stuff about this is that you know what to practice (the first thought), and what order ( first thought is what you need to remove first )

Example : You improvise. The first thought you come up with is " the playing is sloppy, the notes are covered by noise". Then you know what to sit down and isolate.

This is the key masters do consciously or unconsciously.

Good practice.


Lies.
They key to mastering music are modes. Your playing is sloppy? Practice modes!
Your ear is not great? listen to modal music. You feel like you play the same all the time ? get a modal guitar and play modal metal.
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