#1
Hey,

I play guitar in a funk/blues/r&b/hippity-hoppity outfit that has a really...um..inexperienced bass player. I realize that this isn't really the genre to to have said impairment but I'm stuck (happily) with it for the moment. Anywho, I've been thinking about how to rectify the lack of whatever it is bass players do and I've been thinking about the groove. What we play is very groove-centric and to get those low notes out I was thinking about adopting the seven string guitar. What are your collective thoughts on this? Has anyone ever seen a funky seven string? Also, all 7 strings i've seen have been super metal orientated...any options for my style?

Thanks !!!
#3
Can't/wont/not worried. I can and will adapt to the situation and he is growing every day...this is a temporary fix so please keep it limited to the questions i have fielded.

Thanks
#4
I have a seven, but I'd never use it for bass notes to replace a bass player... For your extra low notes in chords and all that, sure, but you won't replace a bassist with it.

Also, groove doesn't need to come from the bassist only, I suppose.
#5
7s are as variable as any other guitar out there, right now.

But if your bass player can't find the groove, even a 7 or 8 string in an alt-tuning won't solve the problem.*

Help, maybe. Solve, no.

What, exactly is the issue?


* unless you go full custom like Charlie Hunter did. His 7s and 8s have a few actual bass strings on them.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Apr 24, 2013,
#6
I think its more of a style thing. He's not used to playing and he isn't really a bass player. I expect the problem will solve itself eventually however my question is more of: What can I do to shore up the lack of a strong bass player in music that is typically basscentric?
#8
Heard someone play a 30" baritone last night, tuned to a lower tuning. It was pretty cool, the tone sounded like a bass and guitar mixed together. I don't know if it would replace a bass player though.
#9
A keyboard player can cover a bass line convincingly*, and it happens a surprising amount of the time. Geddy Lee often plays keys in Rush songs, as does the bass player in Janelle Monae's band. The Doors had no bass player at all.

And, like I mentioned, Charlie Hunter uses custom 7s & 8s with actual bass strings as the 2 or 3 lowest, and as a result, usually does not include a true bass player in his bands.

But honestly, barring improvement by your bass player, you're funked.


* they have two hands...
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Apr 24, 2013,
#10
Quote by dannyalcatraz

But honestly, barring improvement by your bass player, you're funked.


That's quite funny

I'm going to fish for more answers though. Let's say I didn't have a bass player at all and the keys weren't covering much of any bass territory. What could I do as a guitar player to help the groove?
#11
Make sure YOU can find a groove, because you're going to need to play more rhythm. A LOT more. You might even see if you can find a good sax player to take over leads.

An extended scale length guitar- whether 7+ stringed or just a baritone- will help deliver some low end.

An alternative tuning will do likewise.

A pedal like an Orpheus Droptune will also get you some notes in lower registers.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!