#1
Hi there, never used this before but need some help!
I'm looking to pick up a backup LP for gigging (currently using a Gibson LP studio). I found the perfect Epiphone Les Paul standard BUT it's damaged. He claims that they are a few dead frets high up the neck. There are various other problems with the guitar that I'm familiar with and they're all okay. But the dead frets are a worry.
He said he'd sell it for 70 euro which is an absolute bargain. I wouldn't mind having to get it set up to fix the problem, that's relatively inexpensive. But if it has a true dead spot the guitar is useless. And I wouldn't be interested if I had to sink 150 euro on a refret. So I guess my question is, from my incredibly vague description is it worth getting into? On the one hand it's dirt cheap and it could be a simple set up to get a solid backup. Or it could be a complete nightmare and a waste of money.
I've only ever owned American made instruments since my first electric so I'm really not familiar with dead frets and other problems that plague the lower end instruments so any info at all would be appreciated.
Thanks!
Sean.
#2
Quote by S.Troy
Hi there, never used this before but need some help!
I'm looking to pick up a backup LP for gigging (currently using a Gibson LP studio). I found the perfect Epiphone Les Paul standard BUT it's damaged. He claims that they are a few dead frets high up the neck. There are various other problems with the guitar that I'm familiar with and they're all okay. But the dead frets are a worry.
He said he'd sell it for 70 euro which is an absolute bargain. I wouldn't mind having to get it set up to fix the problem, that's relatively inexpensive. But if it has a true dead spot the guitar is useless. And I wouldn't be interested if I had to sink 150 euro on a refret. So I guess my question is, from my incredibly vague description is it worth getting into? On the one hand it's dirt cheap and it could be a simple set up to get a solid backup. Or it could be a complete nightmare and a waste of money.
I've only ever owned American made instruments since my first electric so I'm really not familiar with dead frets and other problems that plague the lower end instruments so any info at all would be appreciated.
Thanks!
Sean.

Depends on why the frets are dead. Could be they've popped up and just need hammered back down, could be the action/relief is set up poorly, and it could be the neck is twisted, if the neck is twisted, you'll be ****ed.
#3
Quote by antisun
Depends on why the frets are dead. Could be they've popped up and just need hammered back down, could be the action/relief is set up poorly, and it could be the neck is twisted, if the neck is twisted, you'll be ****ed.



Thanks for the quick reply. I haven't actually seen the guitar, that's the problem.
I tend to use heavy gague strings so I set up every new guitar I get anyway to compensate. As far as hammering frets down, pricy? I have no idea how that works.
I wouldn't be able to recognize a twisted neck to be honest, any give aways?
He claims that the intonation is off and that some of the frets aren't level. Then again, if he knew it was that simple he probably wouldn't snap my hand off after I offered 70 euro.
Are there any things I should look out for that would immediately red flag it?
Thanks.
#5
Quote by S.Troy
Thanks for the quick reply. I haven't actually seen the guitar, that's the problem.
I tend to use heavy gague strings so I set up every new guitar I get anyway to compensate. As far as hammering frets down, pricy? I have no idea how that works.
I wouldn't be able to recognize a twisted neck to be honest, any give aways?
He claims that the intonation is off and that some of the frets aren't level. Then again, if he knew it was that simple he probably wouldn't snap my hand off after I offered 70 euro.
Are there any things I should look out for that would immediately red flag it?
Thanks.


You could do it yourself. Just look for any frets sticking up and take a hammer and gently knock them down. You could also adjust intonation yourself if you have a tuner. Google it. Theoretically you could also level the frets yourself but be careful on that one. If you look down the neck and tilt the guitar just right (look from the bridge) you should see a blur of frets that look like one big strip of silver, if the neck is twisted, you'll notice gaps between some of the frets on the "blur" of silver. I highly doubt that is the case, most likely the dead frets at the top of the neck are just needing pushed back down, another thing you might need to do is re-angle the neck, this could also cause a problem with dead frets. Again, this is something that is fairly simple to do. If you get the guitar and aren't sure where to go with fixing it up, shoot me a PM, i've set up many guitars to play very nicely and anything i have mentioned doing in this post i have done at some point in time myself. I can give you an idea of how to go about doing so. Ask the guy to take a picture of the fretboard facing down the bridge. I will try and take a picture here in a bit to show you exactly what i mean.
#6


Notice how you can't tell one fret from another at that angle, on a twisted neck, there will be gaps no matter how you angle it.