#1
Cheers fellow musicians of UG!

I had a question about a topic i have been thinking heavily lately, so i though before i make up my mind it's always a good idea to get some sort of second input from other people and hear different opinions on the matter.

So for the tl;dr:ers, my question is in its most basic form: Should i start learning music exclusively through transcribing?

For the people that have time to read, i will continue. I recently finished reading Victor Wooten's book "The Music Lesson", which was a fantastic read. There was one part i fell for more than the others though, and it was the part where Victor compared learning music and learning to improvise to learning to talk. Where we while growing up are surrounded by "masters" at the ability to speak, and that we from birth try to imitate it using our ears, and eventually we learn to speak fluently, so fluently that when we speak we don't have to actively think about what we are saying, it just "comes to us". He said in a way that this is the way we should approach music, learning by trying to imitating the masters by ear, and by doing so our improvising and playing would improve in a similar way to a baby learning to talk.

I found this concept really fascinating, and i have recently been meeting and talking to a lot of jazz musicians (I am a very jazz and fusion oriented player myself, maybe i should have mentioned that earlier) and they have said similar things in the style of "Learn by transcribing" or "The masters didn't have the internet, they learned what they knew from the records of that times greats".

So that led me to the question if i should start making transcribing my main focus, since it would trains your ears and technique at the same time, and it might improve my improvising.

What are your thoughts on the matter? I am strongly considering to learn exclusively by transcribing stuff (and by practicing sight reading, cause that is still a skill i want to have and i need to develop).

Thanks in advance, and take care!
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#2
congrats on coming to that conclusion, it's very true. But also i would recommend not to exclusively do anything. You got the internet, so use it as well. There is Loads of good info on here and stuff, people exchanging ideas. But it always depends on what you want to do, and victor is absolutely right. To develop the language of music and or a genre, you'll have to listen, imitate and learn from the your favorite players, in that order.
And also learn what their influences were, and listen to them and transcribe from then. This whole thing will open up a beautiful world of music to you and you will get to know the sound by heart, and also the history. Have fun.
Last edited by Ignore at Apr 25, 2013,
#3
Quote by Ignore
But also i would recommend not to exclusively do anything.


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you know how you learn, if you'd benefit from a rigid schedule or a theory professor or by playing in bands, definitely do those. don't know? try them out!

it should be emphasized that transcription will be where the brunt of your "practical" musical knowledge* will come from, but it would be foolish to deny yourself any method of understanding your craft.

you can transcribe music for years without understanding triads and eventually learn to understand chords, but it would take 10 minutes to hit that "aha!" moment with a rudimentary knowledge of intervals from a textbook or online resource.

just make and learn music and the knowledge will come naturally, but if you're ever inspired to ask questions or learn a new thing, if you're recommended a book, et cetera, never be ashamed/afraid to do so. art isn't about efficiency - it's about, well, artistry. there's no right or wrong

*- as in intuitively understanding relationships beyond a superficial level. transcription (well, ear training as a whole) is integral in crossing bridge between "knowing how to" and "being able to"
modes are a social construct
#4
Oh silly me, i now realize my post doesn't sound as i intended.

I ment using transcribtion exclusively as a tool for learning tunes, developing my ear and getting better technique! I do a lot of theory study already (both in school and at home with the mark levine jazz theory book) and i play in a jazz trio.

Nevertheless, your posts so far has still been helpful and i realize that i never should do anything exculsively.

I will probably try out this method for a month or two and see how i develop and judge from there, but the results i've had the last couple of days with transcribing chat baker is very promising.

Anyway, i appreciate the feedback so far, it's great. Looking forward to more!

Thanks again!
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."