#1
Hi guys.
I've been playing guitar for 6 years using a Laney Ironheart 120 watt head with an Orange 2x12 cab.
I've been using a boss micro br for a few years now to record some simple backing tracks for practicing, but now I want to start recording properly and try and get an album recorded.
So I was thinking about buying either a peavey pv8 or a beringer 4 track and a shure sm57 to rig up my cab. But then someone suggested to me that to get a perfect quality recording I should buy preamps like the AMT ss-10, engl E570 or mesa boogie recto.
Now obviously that's a very expensive route to take so what do you guys think, is spending loads of money buying expensive preamps really worth it or am I better off just simply buying mics?
#2
What is your aim behind getting an album recorded?

Are you talking about something that can be released professionally, or even just used as a demo to promote your band? If that's the case, you will probably be better off going to a studio to have the job done properly. It will take a long time to get your recording, mixing & mastering skills to the level where you can create something of a professional level. Also, the money you could potentially spend on the equipment to create a professional level recording wouldn't be dissimilar to the amount you would have spent hiring a studio.

If you're talking about simply taking recording more seriously for your own purposes, all you need to know is covered in the Interfaces sticky.
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Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
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#3
GaryBillington is pretty much right.
It would cost a lot of money to set up a home studio to make an album. Room acoustics for a drum kit being the major concern.
I would recommend having your playing so tight air couldn't squeeze past, book studio time, 12 hour lock out (with an engineer) and cut your tracks.
Mix those songs yourself if you choose, or pay someone to do it.
Don't pay for mastering*. If you know what a limiter is you'll be fine.

*Unless you wanna pay big bucks for black magic.
Last edited by roaraudio at Apr 26, 2013,
#4
Gary is quite right.
On the topic of amp preamps or recording gear, that depends on you.
If you aren't happy with the sound coming out of the amp than consider getting a new one, it's certainly not necessary.
Basically, If you are happy with your sound, than don't change it

So if you are happy with your sound, and want to record, than consider what Gary said.


The easiest way to get a decent sounding recording for cheap [imo], and this works best for metal, is to use amp sims. So consider that route as well. It bypasses the problem of poor hardware, and most rooms have shitty acoustics.
RIP Gooze

cats
#5
Quote by roaraudio
Mix those songs yourself if you choose, or pay someone to do it.
Don't pay for mastering*. If you know what a limiter is you'll be fine.

*Unless you wanna pay big bucks for black magic.

It's the mixing & mastering that you DO want to pay for.

Much like learning guitar, it's a skill that takes a lot of time & practice. If you want to create a professional sounding product quickly, you need to get a professional to do it.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#6
You can get an alright master if you do it yourself. Alright in the sense it'll sound better than other peoples unmastered amature jobs.. But i would agree if you want a professional product pay the black hats.
#7
Agree with everyone else more or less. If you're tight with your playing you should be able to track fairly quickly. My band did 7 tracks in 12 hours, that was with 1-2 takes per instrument (drums, bass, 1 guitar, guitar overdubs/solos, vocals) per track and I think that was fairly quick.

I think you should pay for tracking, then if your up for it bring it back and try mixing it yourself. If you're not happy with the mix then pay for mixing, and try your hand at mastering the mix track. If it's still missing something after that then send the original mix track (not your halfassed master) off to someone for mastering.
Attempting to mix and master yourself cost you nothing but time, and then if/when you realise you suck (well, aren't as good as the pros are) you can justify paying for it.
#8
Ok cheers guys.
I've got about 7 songs that I've finished writing myself (drums bass guitar the lot) and the recording side of it its more for my own personal use rather than trying to get a demo just so I can learn how to mix and master myself because even though I know **** all about it that what I enjoy, writing something then record it. Its just the micro br I've got no makes everything song a bit naff.
But I'll look into studios and recording software and see what I can find
#9
If it's just for yourself and you want to learn a bit about mixing & mastering, then forget about going to a studio. Get yourself a multitracker or interface, read the sticky for recommendations.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#10
Quote by GaryBillington
If it's just for yourself and you want to learn a bit about mixing & mastering, then forget about going to a studio. Get yourself a multitracker or interface, read the sticky for recommendations.


Ok will do cheers