#1
I've been wanting to learn how to build my own guitars for a while now, so I decided to start by ordering a Strat kit from guitar fetish. It was easy enough to put together, and I just need to finish it, in cherry red. However, I really don't have any clue how to do this, and all the places I've looked for tips and advice have overwhelmed me. Anyone got clear, good tips and advice on how to do it, and what to use? Thanks!
#2
Probably the hardest thing to do...honestly. If you want it perfect, you can send it to Warmoth and have them do it. Their site has tons of options.

I tried it once, years ago. The trick is to do multiple layers. Paint, sand, wait...paint, sand, wait...etc.

I'm sure with youtube, though...there's plenty of DIY's out there.
#3
Just do what the user above says.
Apply paint.
Sand down when paint drys
Apply more paint
Sand down again
Continue

You might find yourself liking the idea of a rough-looking guitar more and more as the process drags on
#4
A good finish is going to come in the prepping stage, you need to prep the wood first and foremost. And this is just how I did it, there's more than one way I'm sure.

I start with sanding everything to 220 grit.

It's a good idea regardless to use a grain filler on the wood. It'll fill the tiny pores in the wood, you do a coat of that, sand it back, and reapply and sand it back again.

Next step is sanding it up to 320 grit sand paper, 220, then 320.

After that, you can apply a sealer to the wood, which does just that, seals it, helps prevent moisture build up in the wood. I did 3 coats of that lightly sanding with 320 grit in between coats.

After that it depends on what color your going for, solid coats you usually use a primer underneath the final color, for ol natural you can just spray it on. You definitely want to wet sand between coats. I used 800 grit between each one. Apply the color until you get what you're looking for. And do a final wet sanding with 1000 grit once its dry.

Then comes the clear, again, wet sand between coats. 800 again. I ended up doing somewhere between 9-10 coats of clear on my two builds. Depending on what type of clear coat you use drying times vary, just read the instructions on what ever you use regarding dry times. Nitrocellulose is recommended to sit up to a month to get the best finish possible, I did a little over two weeks with no problems. Once it's dry, You can do a final wet sanding, working your way up from 800 to 1800 or 2000 grit. Then polish and youre done.

Hopefully I didn't forget anything :P
#5
Thanks! That really helped. Hopefully I wont screw it up too badly XD