#1
Say you have a backing track going and you have a variety of chords going by and not much time to solo on each one. Say it is just a 4 chord progression in A minor for instance. What is your method of soloing over them?

What I do is try to nail some chord tones where I feel like I want them to be and try my best to improvise with intervals in mind. But when the chords are moving by fast I end up having to make my solos sound sort of "aimless" and having to play fast because I cannot hear where I want my phrases to end. So basically what I end up doing is playing off of just ..in a sense...one chord because it is all I can really keep track of. Everything I play after the chord is sort of hit or miss until the chord I am used to playing over comes back...basically it would be the one chord because I know exactly what the intervals are going to sound like over it.

I have found that the more you know what the intervals are going to sound like over the chords and if you really keep track of the intervals...you can sound really epic no matter how slow or fast you play....if only I knew this years ago lol! I just did not think much of it.
Last edited by Unreal T at Apr 28, 2013,
#2
To a certain degree you've got to hear it in your head. Anyone can bang out random notes in the scale/mode but the best improvs aren't improvised at all, but intentional.
#3
Quote by Unreal T
...What is your method of soloing over them?...


If this fret doesn't sound right, try sliding to the next one. If it still doesn't sound right, bend it... or use the whammy bar...
Last edited by ha_asgag at Apr 28, 2013,
#4
Quote by ha_asgag
If this fret doesn't sound right, try the next one. If it still doesn't sound right, bend it... or use the whammy bar...



that is what i end up doing sometimes..i want to avoid doing that the most. I think way too many guitarists end up doing that too much which is not necessarily why you can say they sound "bad" ...but end up sounding quite similar.
Last edited by Unreal T at Apr 28, 2013,
#5
Quote by ha_asgag
If this fret doesn't sound right, try the next one. If it still doesn't sound right, bend it... or use the whammy bar...

Whammy bar!!!

But yeah, first listen to the backing track until you know the chord changes and how it sounds like. You need to know the backing track well to be able to play over it well. You could also try to sing something over it. That way your soloing won't be too fast scale wanking and it will really sound like a melody.

Oh, and if you can't play what you would like to play over it, just train your ear. You will learn it over time.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Apr 28, 2013,
#6
yeah but then I hear ppl talking about not knowing the chords at all and playing over them...i think that just sort of comes naturally though and subconsciously.
#7
Well, for adding the solos on my band, what i do is I hear the song multiples time first and try to imagine what to play above on my mind (not singing nor anything). Then i grab my guitar and i start to improvise over the solo section many MANY times (probably hundreds). When i'm doing that I usually start to like some phrases of what i'm improvising, so i keep playing them and leaving the improvisation for the rest. Until after some time the solo is finished...


Is kinda 16 bars of solo section...think, think, improv, improv... find a phrase that i like for the first 4 bars. Then i keep the improvisation for the next 12 bars...


I'm also recording all the takes if i forget something on the road...

You can check one of my solo's on one of my actual proyect, and probably be able to understand how i do it


Solo at 1:06
https://soundcloud.com/tabularasachile/te-dejaron-atras
Since 2002 using UG. This page teached me how to play guitar and help'd me to embrace the passion of my life: Music.
#8
Quote by Unreal T
yeah but then I hear ppl talking about not knowing the chords at all and playing over them...i think that just sort of comes naturally though and subconsciously.

Nothing is natural, it all boils down to hard work and dedication. Then is it subconscious.
Chet Baker is famous for not knowing chords, but he was able to solo over them very well.
Just because someone doesn't know what chords are called, doesn't mean they don't know how they sound and what will sound good over them. What are chord is called is the least important aspect of music- it's good to be able to identify it by name but if you can't play it or play over it, what's the point?

The thing is it's a connection between your ears your fingers and your imagination.

So it all starts with wanting to hear something, I think it was Chick Corea that said "Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play".

So it starts with really really wanting to have to hear something, then you need to know how to make that sound on your guitar and that's really it.


EDIT: I would also like to point out there's a song called How Strong, by the Red Hot Chili Peppers, and it's one of the most powerful solos I've ever heard and it's only one note! haha. So keep that in mind.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
Last edited by TDKshorty at Apr 28, 2013,