#1
Its an epiphone DR 100, great guitar sounds good etc etc but even after putting super light strings on it (10-47) there's just too damn much string tension, i usually play electrics and in the past i was a fan of heavy strings in E std (11-50 used to be my favs) but even the 10-47s on the acoustic seem way tighter than they should be, not an action problem, action on the guitar is setup correctly. If i tune down to D standard the guitar is much easier to play and i don't suffer fret buzz or anything like that. Not sure what the issue is.
#2
Place one finger on one string. Press as hard as you can. Play the note at a reasonable volume (don't bash it). Keep playing the note and slowly relieving pressure until you can't sound a clean note anymore.

See how little pressure you need to play a note?

Your guitar is not 'hard as shit to play'.
#3
Ever tried to stick you finger into shit? It isn't hard at all...
#4
Quote by antisun
i usually play electrics

This is the problem - electrics are far easier to play than acoustics, so what seemed easy on your electric will appear more difficult on your acoustic. This is why I always believe it's better to learn on an acoustic, then transfer to electric. Electric guitars hide a lot of weaknesses in your technique, learning acoustic first irons these issues out so when you later start playing electric you will find it much easier. Learning on an electric and then switching to an acoustic is much more difficult, as you suddenly realise that you need to start over with a lot of what you do.

The best advice is to keep practicing, you will eventually get used to your acoustic and the improvements you make will also benefit your electric playing.
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#5
I played a 20-year old nylon-string acoustic which had years-old steel strings on it with a warped neck and an action of what had to be close to an inch, for about 9 months until I got my first electric.

Your guitar is not "hard as shit to play".
#6
the shape of the neck and fingerboard can change the position of a player's fingers so that the guitar is harder to play, but it sounds a lot like your action needs to be lowered. i've found every epiphone i've ever tried to have action higher than i'm comfortable with, and we're talking over 40 epis total.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#7
Trying a different companies strings may help. There's a lot of difference in the tension between various companies. Grab a set of low tension strings first and see if that helps.
#8
Quote by patticake
the shape of the neck and fingerboard can change the position of a player's fingers so that the guitar is harder to play, but it sounds a lot like your action needs to be lowered. i've found every epiphone i've ever tried to have action higher than i'm comfortable with, and we're talking over 40 epis total.
Patti, my man says the action is fine, the strings are almost too light for you

With that said, I just got done playing one of my 12 strings and.......(wait for it)....now my fingeys hurt too....

So does that mean I should buy a "Daisy Rock 6 string", and tune it down to C standard..?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 28, 2013,
#9
i got one you can borrow cranky, not my pink one... that's my main axe.
how long have you had this epi anti ?
#10
Quote by stepchildusmc
how long have you had this epi anti ?
Sixteen years and still counting. I have an Epi 12 string that I bought because it was ooh, "left handed". The neck is on at the wrong angle, and so when the action is brought down the right height, the strings are bouncing off the bridge.

I'm often tempted to pul the machines and let the trash men deal with it, but that would involve admitting to myself that I was wrong for buying it in the first place. No can do...

Not to mention the 300 bucks in 1996 money I'd be throwing away also.

Hm, it hasn't been polished in a while, excuse me for a bit, will ya. It is shiny, but sadly too big for a paperweight.

I wonder if they'd let me do a sticky entitled, "Goldilocks and the three different Acoustics".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 28, 2013,
#11
I believe I know what the problem is... but first let me make a few points.

An acoustic is no harder to play than an electric, if all the physical factors are identical... playability has absolutely nothing to do with whether the body is solid or hollow, and my well set-up acoustic plays as easily as any electric I have ever seen.

Next, the guy who says not to press down any harder than necessary has a point, but I've found that human nature is to not take chances on getting a bad hit, and to press down rather firmly every time. In fact almost everyone presses the strings down all the way to the fretboard.

Which brings me to what I think your problem is. I've noticed that some guitars can have all the same physical factors... the same scale and strings, etc... except for one thing people often overlook. They are harder to play because of the fret height. If you take a set of calipers and measure it (you use the caliper tailpiece and "stick" the frets) you can find out.

My acoustic guitar has the same fret height as my Fender Strat... 40 mils. (a thousandth of an inch is referred to as a "mil"). It plays effortlessly, exactly the same as the Strat. On the other hand, I had another guitar that was a real pain in the ass to play, and I found the frets were 60 mils high. That, my friend, was the cause... plain and simple. When pressing the string down to the fretboard, you had to go furthur and press harder to bend it more.

So measure your fret heights and see if that's not the issue. If so, you can have them lowered pretty easily, by a good luthier.

Cheers,

Jean
Last edited by Prescott_Player at May 3, 2013,
#12
i've never found higher frets harder to play because you simply don't have to push the strings down as far on them. if you do, well, yes, they'll be harder to play, but you shouldn't have to push the strings to the fretboard.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#13
It's an instinctive thing... my guess is that if we took a survey, 8 out of 10 people would say they press the strings all the way to the fretboard... therefore, a combination of light strings and low frets would give them what they would consider an "easy guitar to play".