#1
Anyone got a link to some resources that teach some variations of power chords for electric?

Particularly type of power chords mark tremonti uses in alter bridge and his own stuff, he's always using these thick chunky sounding power chord variations and multiple types as well.
#2
A power chord consists of a root and a fifth, find any way of playing those two notes and you have a power chord.
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#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
A power chord consists of a root and a fifth, find any way of playing those two notes and you have a power chord.


I guess it isnt power chord then, just more stuff like C6 etc and power chord inversions i guess

But I call em power chord variations cause generally they are around 3 notes as well.
Last edited by Captshiznit at Apr 28, 2013,
#4
There is not that many "variations" of power chords, it's just a two note chord, root and fifth.

You could always try playing the fifth in bass instead of the root. Example: G as lowest note and then a C.

Or you could play a power chord and and then add a fifth below that. Example G as lowest note, then a C and then a G.

You could add the root note one octave higher. Example C as lowest note, then a G and then a C.

Or you could try 4 notes. For example a C power chord. G in the bass, then a C, then a G and then a C again. Sounds rather heavy.
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#5
Quote by Captshiznit
I guess it isnt power chord then, just more stuff like C6 etc,

But I call em power chord variations cause generally they are around 3 notes as well.


See now I'm just confused, you seem to know what you're doing so why not just make your own?

Quote by Sickz
There is not that many "variations" of power chords, it's just a two note chord, root and fifth.


I don't know dude, there's probably more than you might think; I can think of probably around 8 or 9 variations just off the top of my head, most of which I use regularly.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Apr 28, 2013,
#6
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
See now I'm just confused, you seem to know what you're doing so why not just make your own?



I seem too but I really don't Haha, thats why i'm asking if anyone sort of has any basic info in right direction.
#7
Quote by Captshiznit
I seem too but I really don't Haha, thats why i'm asking if anyone sort of has any basic info in right direction.


Well to be honest I think they best ways of going about it right now would be: taking a good look at some Alter Bridge, Creed or Tremonti tabs and finding the ones you like; or experimenting. Take the power chords you know and mess around with adding notes where ever you can, no one's going to appear out of nowhere and arrest you for doing things without knowing what you're really doing.
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#8
Particularly type of power chords mark tremonti uses in alter bridge and his own stuff, he's always using these thick chunky sounding power chord variations and multiple types as well.

His chords sound chunky mainly because of two reasons:

1. The bass guitar fills out the low end, thus making the guitar sound thicker than it really is. If you isolate the guitar from the bass, it will sound really thin.

2. He uses dropped tunings, so it's easier to play octaved power chords. For example, if you're playing a C power chord in a dropped tuning, instead of playing just two notes [00xxxx], you play four [0002xx]. The higher notes make the chord sound more defined.

Hope that helps.
Last edited by hriday_hazarika at Apr 28, 2013,
#9
A---7---- Normal A5 power chord.
E---5----

A---0---- A5 power chord w/ the 5th in the bass. Sounds meaty.
E---0----

D---2---- Am triad. Make that 3 a 4 for major.
A---3-----Make the 2 a 3 for Am6 or something.
E---5----

G---5---- Am triad inversion.
D---7----
A---7----

Blah Blah Blah. Make stuff up. That's how I learned a lot of this junk.
#10
In drop tuning, here are some of the variations I use:

G--------------------8
D--5---7---8---9---5
A--5---5---5---5---5
D--5---5---5---5---5

Im not exactly sure of the names, but I think in that order they are: standard, Sus2, minor and Major power cords. Not sure what the last one would be called.
#11
please post the power chord chart. I think it's more easy when i use those chords.HAHAHA
#12
Quote by Sickz
There is not that many "variations" of power chords, it's just a two note chord, root and fifth.


A two note chord?

baab
#13
Quote by My Last Words
A two note chord?



Don't be a smartass, you and everyone else in the thread knew exactly what he meant.
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