#1
Hi dear members of UG!! There is a question suddenly popped up into my mind that I'd like you people to answer it. I'm not able to play my electric guitar connected to an amp always because of my family members and my neighbors as they get annoyed with it. Yes, I've already tried to play with my headphone on, but I'm not quite comfortable with it either. Now I'd like to know that is it wrong practicing without an amp/guitar processor?
#2
You really do need to practice with the amount of gain you're going to use regularly but there's nothing wrong with practicing a fair bit either on clean or without an amp either.
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#4
It can be good for some things, clean stuff mostly as you can't hear the hi gain problems from open stings etc. But yeah, you hear any other mistakes, like not sounding a note right. You need an amp for practicing anything with sustain though
#5
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
You really do need to practice with the amount of gain you're going to use regularly but there's nothing wrong with practicing a fair bit either on clean or without an amp either.



I'd disagree with the first bit. A lot of gain can easily cover up subtle mistakes.
#6
I have found playing with more gain makes your mistakes a lot more predominant, simply because the signal is so much more sensitive. With lots of gain every little thing you do is picked up, you have to be so much more precise and really practice the hell out of your technique with high gain sounds.
With clean channel playing all you have to really focus on is keeping your strumming and dynamics consistent.
#7
Quote by N1ghtmar3C1n3ma
I have found playing with more gain makes your mistakes a lot more predominant, simply because the signal is so much more sensitive. With lots of gain every little thing you do is picked up, you have to be so much more precise and really practice the hell out of your technique with high gain sounds.
With clean channel playing all you have to really focus on is keeping your strumming and dynamics consistent.



Fair enough, good point to an extent.
I still think clean is the way to go when practicing, pretty much for the reason you said in your last sentence.
Last edited by derek8520 at Apr 28, 2013,
#8
Quote by N1ghtmar3C1n3ma
I have found playing with more gain makes your mistakes a lot more predominant, simply because the signal is so much more sensitive. With lots of gain every little thing you do is picked up, you have to be so much more precise and really practice the hell out of your technique with high gain sounds.
With clean channel playing all you have to really focus on is keeping your strumming and dynamics consistent.



Gain only works to mask mistakes.

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#9
Thank you people for helping me out here. I have experienced that gain does mask minor errors in playing, but if someone plays a phrase horribly sloppy, the gain wouldn't help to cover up the mistakes. As for me I tend to learn new things on my guitar in absolutely clean channel without any effect. But even if I learn all the notes of that particular phrase I need to work on exclusively with gain later because while playing with gain I need to be careful with the high output that I don't pick up anything wrong. But it seems I rarely find chance to play with my amp. Will playing totally unplugged/zero distortion frequently, influence my playing negatively?
#10
Gain only works to mask mistakes? When you play clean you do have to play more "cleanly" in one sense to get the notes to ring out, on the other hand a lot of your sloppyness that you won't hear with the clean sound will sound a complete mess with gain.

Gain adds compression to your sound, meaning you can often play lighter and faster more easily, but because of that compression it also brings up the sloppyness, the hand rubbing the strings, any string noise. This is why it's popular for players to use a dampening device (like a hair band/bobble) up near the nut to mute unwanted playing noise with gain.


Don't listen to the idea that gain only covers your mistakes, because if you only played clean then you would never hear the mistakes you're making that the high gain sound will amplify. Learning to control a higher gain sound is important if you intend to use it, that means practicing with it is important.


As for practicing unplugged, it's better than not practicing at all, it won't hurt. I practice uplugged a lot, especially for warming up. I have inear monitors I wrap around my ear and run the wire down my back into an extension lead, it doesn't get in the way.
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Last edited by Bigbazz at Apr 28, 2013,
#11
Get used to the headphones. If they are uncomfortable, then you might need some better ones.
#12
Quote by derek8520
Fair enough, good point to an extent.
I still think clean is the way to go when practicing, pretty much for the reason you said in your last sentence.


You need both. No amount of clean practicing is going to make you perfect your muting.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#14
Quote by Bigbazz
Gain only works to mask mistakes? When you play clean you do have to play more "cleanly" in one sense to get the notes....

Thank you for stopping by and making valuable comment. I agree with you regarding controlling gain. Learning to control a higher gain sound is surely necessary and important if someone wants to use it in his playing, that's why I've mentioned before that after I learn something new on clean channel, I work on exclusively playing with gain. I am not a very good player so I face difficulty to control high gain sound. But still gain covers up very small mistakes in playing but a really bad playing can't be covered up with gain, that is sure.

Quote by W4RP1G
Get used to the headphones....

Can you suggest me any good but affordable headphone that is comfortable while playing?
#15
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
You need both....

Agreed. Learning to mute properly certainly requires to practice with gain (i.e. practice riffing). But unfortunately I have to practice totally unplugged for most of the time.
#16
Quote by Delboyuk_01
Buy an acoustic and get used to the headphones. Although I did have an old neighbour complain about me playing an acoustic one, I couldn't believe that lol.

Its hard to believe any complaint against playing acoustic guitar from the neighbors. Can you suggest any decent and comfortable but inexpensive headphone?
#18
Quote by W4RP1G
They are really comfortable, and sound pretty awesome. Shure might have a newer model out, I don't know. I've had mine for probably 5-6 years.

Thanks a lot for your suggestion. I will definitely look up in the local stores.
#19
Not easy to get well sounding and well built headphones for small money. What is inexpensive for you?

You should go to a store and try to find headphones that feels comfortable. Hard to recommend on comfortableness, is that a word? , it depends on your head. Open headphones tend to feel lighter and are not so claustrofobic. I play with a couple of Sennheiser HD555 and they are great, for me at least.

The HD555 isn't around any more i think but try out the HD518. With higher budget, try the HD558 and the HD598.
#20
Quote by Bigbazz
Gain only works to mask mistakes? When you play clean you do have to play more "cleanly" in one sense to get the notes to ring out, on the other hand a lot of your sloppyness that you won't hear with the clean sound will sound a complete mess with gain.

Gain adds compression to your sound, meaning you can often play lighter and faster more easily, but because of that compression it also brings up the sloppyness, the hand rubbing the strings, any string noise. This is why it's popular for players to use a dampening device (like a hair band/bobble) up near the nut to mute unwanted playing noise with gain.


Don't listen to the idea that gain only covers your mistakes, because if you only played clean then you would never hear the mistakes you're making that the high gain sound will amplify. Learning to control a higher gain sound is important if you intend to use it, that means practicing with it is important.


As for practicing unplugged, it's better than not practicing at all, it won't hurt. I practice uplugged a lot, especially for warming up. I have inear monitors I wrap around my ear and run the wire down my back into an extension lead, it doesn't get in the way.


+1, exactly.
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#21
Quote by Sledgeman
Not easy to get well sounding and well built headphones for small money. What is inexpensive for....

I can't go over $90 and I have to wait to save up this amount of money and then I have to get to the store to see that whether they are available or not.
#22
Look for refurbished headphones- I have some nice refurbed Sony over-ear phones that were $5 a pair. I give them away. I even snagged some refurbed noise-cancelling Sonys for under $50.
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#23
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Look for refurbished headphones....

I actually want to go for a new one. But I have to wait till I save up the amount and also the good ones within my budget have to be available in the local stores. And thanks for reminding me about Sony Headphones, I need to check their availability and price in the local shops.
#24
Gain or no gain, practicing isn't going to do you any harm. Play unplugged if you have to, plugged when you can.


/thread.
#25
Quote by stranger_23
Hi dear members of UG!! There is a question suddenly popped up into my mind that I'd like you people to answer it. I'm not able to play my electric guitar connected to an amp always because of my family members and my neighbors as they get annoyed with it. Yes, I've already tried to play with my headphone on, but I'm not quite comfortable with it either. Now I'd like to know that is it wrong practicing without an amp/guitar processor?


Practicing Scales and Chords while you're unplugged is great.
#26
Quote by RedJamaX
Practicing Scales and Chords while you're unplugged is great.

As I can't play my electric guitar connected to my amp always and also I am quite uncomfortable at playing with my current headphones on, not only scales and chords but I even practice songs, solos, licks on my guitar totally unplugged most of the time. Seems I've got to get used to playing with my headphone on.