Page 1 of 2
#1
Most of the guitars that I've owned are/have been bolt-on neck guitars.
While I've learned to do most of the setup on my own, I've never had to mess with detaching the neck yet.

I kinda want to try it because one of the strats that I own has the truss rod adjustment at the neck heel, but am kinda afraid that I'll somehow screw up re-attaching it.

most of the sources that I've looked mentioned having to be absolutely meticulous with the centering of the neck, and tightening the screws just right(i.e. not too tight) to get the proper angle of the neck.
the latter just blows my freakin mind... like I can't screw them completely tight or something?

So is my guitar gonna be in a pretty bad shape if I just slap it back in the joint slot and tighten the screws away?? or are those things mentioned above kind of overkill??

If someone who does this regularly can answer me, I'd be grateful
Guitars:
* Custom "does-it-all" Strat
*'12 James Tyler Studio Elite HD Burning Water (HSH)
* EVH Wolfgang Special Stealth HT
#2
When you unscrew it don't just do it 1 at a time.

Unscrew 1 by roughly 2 turns, then the screw diagonally opposite it 2 turns, repeat for each screw. Then perhaps do 4 and then 8 turns each by which point it should start to loosen up and you can unscrew them completely.

The point is you want to release the tension of all the screws at roughly the same rate, if you just unscrew one then there is going to be a lot of tension on the rest of the neck. When you put the neck back in the slot and screw it back up do the same thing, tension it gradually moving between the screws until they are all tight. Don't go overboard tightening it up, once it is firm it is good.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
Last edited by Bigbazz at Apr 29, 2013,
#3
I take necks off and put them on in about 20 seconds each way. There's nothing special to it, assuming the heel and pocket are made well. Just remember that you push the neck in (or lift it out) vertically, assuming the guitar is laying flat. So guitar facing up, lift the neck up and out/push down and in. You do not slide it in parallel to the neck's length.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#4
Quote by Bigbazz
When you unscrew it don't just do it 1 at a time.

Unscrew 1 by roughly 2 turns, then the screw diagonally opposite it 2 turns, repeat for each screw. Then perhaps do 4 and then 8 turns each by which point it should start to loosen up and you can unscrew them completely.

The point is you want to release the tension of all the screws at roughly the same rate, if you just unscrew one then there is going to be a lot of tension on the rest of the neck. When you put the neck back in the slot and screw it back up do the same thing, tension it gradually moving between the screws until they are all tight. Don't go overboard tightening it up, once it is firm it is good.


i dont know if i buy that.


if the strings aren't on, what tension are you talking about? Screws in the heel aren't going to affect the rest of the neck as greatly as you suggest if the strings aren't on.
Quote by yellowfrizbee
What does a girl have to do to get it in the butt thats all I ever wanted from you. Why, Ace? Why? I clean my asshole every night hoping and wishing and it never happens.
Bitches be Crazy.

▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
#5
Quote by Acϵ♠
i dont know if i buy that.


if the strings aren't on, what tension are you talking about? Screws in the heel aren't going to affect the rest of the neck as greatly as you suggest if the strings aren't on.


It's not about the strings, its about how the neck sits in the pocket, when you tighten one screw it moves the neck slightly in one direction, when you do the opposite it will pull it in the other direction. The point is that it ensures you add equal tension to each corner so that it sits straight in the pocket without adding excess strain in any one direction at a time.


These are basic fundimentals here, it ain't rocket science and it doesn't just apply to working on guitars.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
Last edited by Bigbazz at Apr 29, 2013,
#6
That would only apply if your parts aren't made very well and there's room for the neck to move. With properly made parts there's no room for anything to shift, no matter whether you put bolts in one at a time, all at once, or leave some out.

Hell, I've got a couple of bolt-on guitars which have such well-fitting heels and necks, I didn't even have to put any bolts in at all before stringing and playing. A good bolt-on join should allow you to, at the least, pick the whole guitar up by the neck without having to put the bolts in.

If your heel and pocket are made in such a way that they shift as you're bolting them together, something has gone wrong with the guitar or the parts are simply badly made to begin with.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#7
Quote by MrFlibble

Hell, I've got a couple of bolt-on guitars which have such well-fitting heels and necks, I didn't even have to put any bolts in at all before stringing and playing.


I'm thinking I'd have to see that...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#8
Quote by MrFlibble
That would only apply if your parts aren't made very well and there's room for the neck to move. With properly made parts there's no room for anything to shift, no matter whether you put bolts in one at a time, all at once, or leave some out.

Hell, I've got a couple of bolt-on guitars which have such well-fitting heels and necks, I didn't even have to put any bolts in at all before stringing and playing. A good bolt-on join should allow you to, at the least, pick the whole guitar up by the neck without having to put the bolts in.

If your heel and pocket are made in such a way that they shift as you're bolting them together, something has gone wrong with the guitar or the parts are simply badly made to begin with.


I just think you don't understand. You do this when you put on a car wheel too (or you're supposed to), or when tightening up the bolts on a piece of machinery. It isn't about how well built it is, it's about having "even" tension accross the whole surface, and avoiding over stressing single points. It's not about "big movements" as you're imagining, but tolerences.

I assumed guitarists would think of this as basic fundimentals, especially those experienced in setting up or building guitars.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
Last edited by Bigbazz at Apr 29, 2013,
#9
Quote by Bigbazz
I just think you don't understand. You do this when you put on a car wheel too (or you're supposed to), or when tightening up the bolts on a piece of machinery. It isn't about how well built it is, it's about having "even" tension accross the whole surface, and avoiding over stressing single points. It's not about "big movements" as you're imagining, but tolerences.

I assumed guitarists would think of this as basic fundimentals, especially those experienced in setting up or building guitars.


Agreed, it's done this way on pretty much any piece of precision machinery (and a whole lot of not-so-precision machinery) so the stresses across the plane are consistent.

Does in NEED to be done with a guitar neck? Perhaps not, but there's no harm and precious little time lost in so doing. I use a torque screwdriver with mine as well, and tighten in 3 stages, which is almost certainly overkill, but I can live with that.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#10
I think you guys are all thinking way too deeply about something as simple as screwing two bits of wood together.
#12
Quote by N1ghtmar3C1n3ma
I think you guys are all thinking way too deeply about something as simple as screwing two bits of wood together.


Built and/or repaired a lot of guitars have you?

You sound like a CBS era Fender exec...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#13
Quote by Arby911
Built and/or repaired a lot of guitars have you?

You sound like a CBS era Fender exec...


#14
Quote by Arby911
Built and/or repaired a lot of guitars have you?

You sound like a CBS era Fender exec...


Removed your head from your arse recently?

And actually yes I have repaired and touched up so many guitars with bolt necks I have lost count.


It is as Flibble sais, all in the neck pocket, how you screw the neck on really does not make a bit of difference. Try actually playing your guitar instead of obsessing over how precisely you bolt your neck on.
#15
Quote by N1ghtmar3C1n3ma
Removed your head from your arse recently?

And actually yes I have repaired and touched up so many guitars with bolt necks I have lost count.


It is as Flibble sais, all in the neck pocket, how you screw the neck on really does not make a bit of difference. Try actually playing your guitar instead of obsessing over how precisely you bolt your neck on.


So you're a fan of slipshod workmanship and poor recordkeeping.

Good to know...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Apr 29, 2013,
#16
It's not thinking deeply, I was taught this way I guess with my dad being an engineer things like this were drummed into me, always seen it done this way and always done it this way myself, guitar repair books I own also instruct to do it this way and since it really doesn't require any extra effort I've never seen the need to not do it.

The guy asked for advice and I gave him the best advice I could from what I know. A guitar is a precision instrument, why would you not treat it properly. If you want to wing it that's fine, nobody is saying it isn't going to work, but the method is used for a reason, and it really is not a hard concept to grasp.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#17
Quote by N1ghtmar3C1n3ma
And actually yes I have repaired and touched up so many guitars with bolt necks I have lost count.


It is as Flibble sais, all in the neck pocket, how you screw the neck on really does not make a bit of difference. Try actually playing your guitar instead of obsessing over how precisely you bolt your neck on.

Yes you can put the neck screws in how ever you want. Is it a bad thing to tighten the screws in an even pattern absolutely not. Like has been stated this is the way most machinery, auto-parts, ect are actually put-on.

And it does help with not over tightening the screws ( especially people with little mechanical knowledge)
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#18
Quote by Arby911
So you're a fan of slipshod workmanship and poor recordkeeping.

Good to know...


No, I just put the time and effort into sanding the neck heel and pocket, ensuring the fit is as tight as possible with maximum wood on wood contact and a killer set up than recording and logging how much I have tightened some screws to secure my neck in.

You seem like the kind of guy who records his bowel movements and finger nail growth.
#19
Quote by N1ghtmar3C1n3ma
You seem like the kind of guy who records his bowel movements and finger nail growth.


You mean you don't?!
#20
Quote by Arby911
I'm thinking I'd have to see that...
I did intend to video it, but as usually happens with me and video, I get too stuck into whatever it is I'm doing to set the camera up.

The next time I restring that guitar I will get the camera out, though, and do it then. Just for lulz if nothing else. I'm quite proud of how well it is made, mechanically.

Quote by Bigbazz
words

Again, if there's no room for anything to shift—as there should be—then it is irrelevant. It's like changing strings; yes, you could do them one at a time to maintain even tension and minimise warping, or... you could just do them all in one big go because **** it, a properly-made neck is not going to suddenly wrap itself in a knot just because it's not had strings on it for two and a half minutes.

If you really thought any harm could be done to a neck heel or pocket by not putting the bolts in systematically then I wonder if you expect a guitar to snap in two every time a vibrato bar is used.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#21
This thread has me laughing...poor TS. No need to "detach" the neck to adjust your truss rod...in fact, you can not adjust your neck relief with the neck removed. Here: http://www.strat-talk.com/resources/adjust-your-guitar%E2%80%99s-truss-rod/

Edit: If you do feel the need to remove and replace a neck at some point and are worried about alignment, simply loosely install the screws and string up both E strings (again, slight tension just to make them pull straight) and ensure even alignment on both with the parallel edges of your finger board. Then tighten up the screws...evenly of course.
Ibanez RGT6 EXFX
Fender American Stratocaster
Epiphone Slash Goldtop Les Paul
Carvin DC-135
Washburn G-5V
Taylor 214CEG

EVH 5150 III
Peavey 6505+
Line 6 Flextone III
50s Valco Supro
Last edited by dkunick at Apr 29, 2013,
#22
Quote by MrFlibble
If you really thought any harm could be done to a neck heel or pocket by not putting the bolts in systematically then I wonder if you expect a guitar to snap in two every time a vibrato bar is used.


I'm not sure how those relate?

Tightening systematically is merely a simple method of ensuring maximum clamping efficiency, no more and no less. As I initially noted, it may NOT be necessary, but it's the work of a moment to do it, so why not?

Quote by N1ghtmar3C1n3ma
No, I just put the time and effort into sanding the neck heel and pocket, ensuring the fit is as tight as possible with maximum wood on wood contact and a killer set up than recording and logging how much I have tightened some screws to secure my neck in.

You seem like the kind of guy who records his bowel movements and finger nail growth.


I strongly suspect that if you knew half of what you think you do you would know at least twice as much as you actually do.

Have a nice day.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Apr 29, 2013,
#23
Quote by Bigbazz
I just think you don't understand. You do this when you put on a car wheel too (or you're supposed to), or when tightening up the bolts on a piece of machinery. It isn't about how well built it is, it's about having "even" tension accross the whole surface, and avoiding over stressing single points. It's not about "big movements" as you're imagining, but tolerences.


You're overthinking this. What damage do you think the wood is going to incur as a result of not removing screws out in a manner like you say?

I agree with MrFlibble you just need to line your holes up correctly and screw them in. Pretty hard to stuff it up if your 4 holes are lined up correctly everything is fine.
#24
Quote by azn_guitarist25
You're overthinking this. What damage do you think the wood is going to incur as a result of not removing screws out in a manner like you say?

I agree with MrFlibble you just need to line your holes up correctly and screw them in. Pretty hard to stuff it up if your 4 holes are lined up correctly everything is fine.


Why do you wear a seatbelt in a car?

Does it require any real extra effort? no
Does it reduce the risk of damage? yes

So then why would you not do it. You're making the mistake of thinking I've sat here and really thought about this, when infact I was simply taught to do it this way, somebody else did all the thinking and all I am showing is knowledge that has been passed on to me.

The guy asked how to take off a neck, and I told him how to do it in the correct way. Can you think of even one practical reason why you wouldn't do it this way?
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#25
Quote by Bigbazz
Why do you wear a seatbelt in a car?

Does it require any real extra effort? no
Does it reduce the risk of damage? yes

So then why would you not do it. You're making the mistake of thinking I've sat here and really thought about this, when infact I was simply taught to do it this way, somebody else did all the thinking and all I am showing is knowledge that has been passed on to me.

The guy asked how to take off a neck, and I told him how to do it in the correct way. Can you think of even one practical reason why you wouldn't do it this way?


It's a law over here But your example isn't that great either see a seat belt has been proven to save lives, taking off bolts in a random order on a guitar neck hasn't broken anything yet. Unless you know of one?

What you're saying is you're taking something someone has said to you and not made sense of it. That's a great way to spread misinformation. Did you also know that if you have sex you will get pregnant and die, I was informed by a knowledgeable gentleman on this subject who may or may not have been on mean girls.

As for practical reasons well time would be a pretty good one. But lets be honest if your neck is off as is you've probably got bigger issues

Edit: Just to clarify myself I'm not hating on your method of removing in a certain pattern it helps on assemblies where you have things under preload, or when you tighten up large assemblies. However on a guitar neck where it will see 70kg of tension across the strings and handles it fine do you think fully unscrewing a screw will do anything?
Last edited by azn_guitarist25 at Apr 30, 2013,
#26
Quote by azn_guitarist25
It's a law over here But your example isn't that great either see a seat belt has been proven to save lives, taking off bolts in a random order on a guitar neck hasn't broken anything yet. Unless you know of one?

What you're saying is you're taking something someone has said to you and not made sense of it. That's a great way to spread misinformation. Did you also know that if you have sex you will get pregnant and die, I was informed by a knowledgeable gentleman on this subject who may or may not have been on mean girls.

As for practical reasons well time would be a pretty good one. But lets be honest if your neck is off as is you've probably got bigger issues


Education / misinformation.


I find it quite laughable that people can be so ignorant with this, I'm stating a widely used method in all forms of engineering, joinery and other crafts, a method instructed in books, taught in schools here, something considered absolutely basic common sense when it comes to working on a guitar.


Why do you need to fight against something that has no drawbacks, is widely used and is considered common everyday knowledge by many?
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#27
I think lots of people here are assuming that everyone deals with high craftsmanship instruments. A proper bolt-on neck shouldn't allow any movement at all, but to be honest as a poor bastard all the bolt-on guitars I had and seen belonging to the low end side of instruments had a range of downright untrustworthy to barely passable neck joints. Suppose the extra bit of precaution doesn't hurt.

Also, perhaps you're thinking mostly of the wood moving while you unscrew/screw the neck, but even without movement strain is still being relieved/applied. If it is a valid application while handling metals I don't see why it wouldn't be on wood, which is far softer.

Just an opinion, I'm by no means a luthier or a guitar technician.
Quote by primusfan
It wasn't mean, it was Portuguese.

Master Saruwatari of the Pit Samurai Pm theguitarist to join

Membro do clube Português do UG.
Last edited by jmag at Apr 30, 2013,
#28
Quote by Bigbazz
I find it quite laughable that people can be so ignorant with this, I'm stating a widely used method in all forms of engineering, joinery and other crafts, a method instructed in books, taught in schools here, something considered absolutely basic common sense when it comes to working on a guitar.


So when you bought your guitar did you pull it all apart and then put it back together and torqued up all the screws to the correct tension? But before that did you work out how much each bolt needs to be torqued up to? No point in saying you'll need to do this bolt up this amount before going to the next bolt then back if you aren't even going to do them to the right torque, right?

Like I said your methodology has it's merits, for unbolting a guitar neck...not so much.

Edit: I'll try and explain what I mean. You have a flat tire and pull over on the side of the road. You jack the car up and undo the wheel nuts. You take 1 wheel nut off. What happens to the rest of the nuts. Do the forces exerted on the wheel from the nut increase, decrease or stay the same?
Last edited by azn_guitarist25 at Apr 30, 2013,
#29
Quote by azn_guitarist25
So when you bought your guitar did you pull it all apart and then put it back together and torqued up all the screws to the correct tension? But before that did you work out how much each bolt needs to be torqued up to? No point in saying you'll need to do this bolt up this amount before going to the next bolt then back if you aren't even going to do them to the right torque, right?

Like I said your methodology has it's merits, for unbolting a guitar neck...not so much.


Wrong again, it's just as important for unbolting with the relief of pressure/tension. It isn't "my methodology" I told you before, you're clutching at straws here honestly I don't see what you're trying to achieve.

It isn't me you're arguing with. Like I said this stuff is taught in schools, books etc. I don't think I've ever seen it not done this way in my life. I'l say this, my grandad was a carpenter, my brother and best mate are both joiners/carpenters (brother runs his own joinery) and my dad was an engineer. So perhaps I've been around this kind of mentality more than most but what I'm talking about to them would be considered just basic knowledge, something you do without thinking about it, something that needs no discussion.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#30
This seems like arguing for the sake of it. Bigbazz brought up something I had never really put too much thought into, and now I will. That's a choice. Saying that anyone is over thinking this is really asinine, given the OP. if Bazz's method is more of a precaution, I'd rather go with that, especially given the nature of mechanics - again, it's something I had not considered, but now will.
OffsetOffset
#31
Quote by Bigbazz
Wrong again, it's just as important for unbolting with the relief of pressure/tension. It isn't "my methodology" I told you before, you're clutching at straws here honestly I don't see what you're trying to achieve.

It isn't me you're arguing with. Like I said this stuff is taught in schools, books etc. I don't think I've ever seen it not done this way in my life. I'l say this, my grandad was a carpenter, my brother and best mate are both joiners/carpenters (brother runs his own joinery) and my dad was an engineer. So perhaps I've been around this kind of mentality more than most but what I'm talking about to them would be considered just basic knowledge, something you do without thinking about it, something that needs no discussion.


Well lets skip over me asking whether or not you did your screws up to the correct torque or whether you even bothered thinking about the wheel nut problem that would let you see the problem from my side.

I've only found 1 example of unbolting in a certain manner and that's on cylinder heads and they are torqued up in a certain pattern originally as well. Otherwise I can think of any assembly that are preloaded that you'll need to do the same but guitar necks are neither preloaded or cylinder heads. So yeah I don't know I've looked through my mechanical engineering book and they don't talk about unbolting so maybe it's an old time thing that I just haven't grown into. Silly modern engineers what do they know right?

Either way the way I see it when you're undoing a guitar neck you're removing a clamping load so if anything you'd be removing tension on the actual neck around the heel area which is plenty thick in most cases.
#32
Only on the internut can people get into an argument about cross torque and removing the neck of a Strat.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#33
Quote by azn_guitarist25
Well lets skip over me asking whether or not you did your screws up to the correct torque or whether you even bothered thinking about the wheel nut problem that would let you see the problem from my side.

I've only found 1 example of unbolting in a certain manner and that's on cylinder heads and they are torqued up in a certain pattern originally as well. Otherwise I can think of any assembly that are preloaded that you'll need to do the same but guitar necks are neither preloaded or cylinder heads. So yeah I don't know I've looked through my mechanical engineering book and they don't talk about unbolting so maybe it's an old time thing that I just haven't grown into. Silly modern engineers what do they know right?

Either way the way I see it when you're undoing a guitar neck you're removing a clamping load so if anything you'd be removing tension on the actual neck around the heel area which is plenty thick in most cases.


If you really want to know the why behind the what, research elastic interaction and preload scatter. It works both ways, tightening or loosening.

Of course removing the screws is less critical in this instance, because unless their elastic interaction causes failure in the medium (strips the thread(s) on the unremoved screw or causes crush compression in the joint) it's unlikely to ever matter.

But since it adds only a few seconds to the process, why not do it correctly? Loosen all fasteners a nominal amount (I use 1/2 turn) in a cross pattern, then go back and remove completely.

Tightening is (or may be) a bit more important, because proper tightening ensures maximum contact across the surface, which may lead to better sustain. Tightening a single screw to maximum torque first, then tightening the others similarly not only induces additional stress in the initial screw due to bolt crosstalk (think leverage across a plane) it ensures that you will have uneven contact pressure across the joint.

And to reiterate yet again, none of this may be NECESSARY, and any performance gains may be so small as to be insignificant, but it adds almost no time to the overall process so why not?

As per the seatbelt analogy above, I don't wear seatbelts because it's the law, or because of what they might do, I wear them because there's no rational reason not to...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#34
Quote by Bhaok
Only on the internut can people get into an argument about cross torque and removing the neck of a Strat.

While completely ignoring the fact TS doesn't need to remove the neck in the first place. Truly hilarious.
Ibanez RGT6 EXFX
Fender American Stratocaster
Epiphone Slash Goldtop Les Paul
Carvin DC-135
Washburn G-5V
Taylor 214CEG

EVH 5150 III
Peavey 6505+
Line 6 Flextone III
50s Valco Supro
#35
This is hilarious. Sure physics "dictate" the "proper" way is to screw them all evenly, but if you can honestly, seriously tell a difference in playability and setup by just screwing that damn thing in, then go work for the government as some abnormally perceptive freak. It doesn't make two licks of a difference in anything.
Quote by yellowfrizbee
What does a girl have to do to get it in the butt thats all I ever wanted from you. Why, Ace? Why? I clean my asshole every night hoping and wishing and it never happens.
Bitches be Crazy.

▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
#36
The point is missed, it's about essencially reducing wear and/or the risk of damage. It requires no extra effort so thus there is no valid reason to not do it. Wood is a sensitive material, why not take the extra care?

The proper way of doing this is taught for a reason, to think something so simple, practical and basic is hilarious? Why? Because taking precautions and doing things properly is a bad thing? Because taking extra care with your work is considered funny? Like the dumb kids at school who laughed at the guys who took care with their work?

I came into this thread genuinely believing I was giving away information/advice that was common knowledge, that every guy who has ever setup a guitar would do as casually as replacing a set of strings, I would never have dreamed I'd be arguing with a bunch of "wing it" men over such a subject, least not being laughed at about it.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#37
a 30 second procedure of screwing in some bolts isnt going to damage the neck or guitar unless you're a totally inept idiot lol. that's why it strikes me as funny.
Quote by yellowfrizbee
What does a girl have to do to get it in the butt thats all I ever wanted from you. Why, Ace? Why? I clean my asshole every night hoping and wishing and it never happens.
Bitches be Crazy.

▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
#38
Quote by Acϵ♠
a 30 second procedure of screwing in some bolts isnt going to damage the neck or guitar unless you're a totally inept idiot lol. that's why it strikes me as funny.


I've drilled and filled the mistakes of a lot of totally inept idiots...usually from overtightening, since 'go till it feels tight' is pretty damn subjective...

Thank God for those who half-ass things, they're like money in the bank!
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#39
I think TS abandon this thread long ago...
Ibanez RGT6 EXFX
Fender American Stratocaster
Epiphone Slash Goldtop Les Paul
Carvin DC-135
Washburn G-5V
Taylor 214CEG

EVH 5150 III
Peavey 6505+
Line 6 Flextone III
50s Valco Supro
#40
Quote by Bigbazz
The point is missed, it's about essencially reducing wear and/or the risk of damage. It requires no extra effort so thus there is no valid reason to not do it. Wood is a sensitive material, why not take the extra care?


Because for unscrewing you don't need to. For screwing yeah you can take the extra precaution but unless you know the proper torque and angle that you need then what's the point in doing it? You could be over torquing already or you could be under torquing and that totally defeats the point in torquing in a pattern.

Like I asked before, when you take a wheel nut off a wheel what do you think happens to the rest of the nuts and more importantly the wheel? Or how about we reverse the situation and instead of taking a nut off you remove a wheel bolt. Would it be crazy to assume that around the removed bolt area the stresses will be lower?

Quote by Arby911
If you really want to know the why behind the what, research elastic interaction and preload scatter. It works both ways, tightening or loosening.


Thank you for this. That said I have not found much on elastic interaction/bolt crosstalk and preload scatter with regards to loosening or unbolting connected joints but I've bought another engineering book last night that was written a while back so it may feature something. But I've rarely come across problems that require loosening in a certain manner (only on preloaded parts and cylinder heads).
Page 1 of 2