#1
Hi all. I've recently started looking for methods of practicing to increase speed. I've seen time and time again the key is to practice slow and make sure you get it 100% right with no tension, being completely relaxed.

My question is - how long do you practice like this, or how long is a practice "session?" Specifically - I came across a method of 5 "sessions" at 20-35% of max speed, 50% for 3, and continually increase. So the question is how long is a "session?" I know some people might practice for 30 minutes, while others for hours at a time. I can't imagine anyone sits there for 3 hours a pop practicing a run or technique at 35% max speed, 5 times in a row do they?
#2
Even 15 minutes of structured practice to a metronome being 100% focused and not slacking/cheating will benefit you immensely. I honestly wouldn't put any more than 30minutes maximum. Anyone who hasn't gone insane after 30minutes of real practice to a metronome is some kind of freak.
If i were that concerned about my speed I'd just practice 15-30minutes of strict metronome practice then spend the rest of my time learning songs or whatever else it is you enjoy doing.
Sure you could spend like 8hours of straight metronome practice every day but i don't think it'd help that much more than 30minutes a day. Your brain needs time to process and understand what you're doing.. If you do too much of one thing for too long you'll just burn yourself out and almost definitely get worse and frustrated because it's just too much. I am sure almost every guitar player who has practiced too much of one thing for too long has just totally burnt themselves out and gotten worse at that time. It's frustrating and you think to yourself what the **** is wrong with me.. I could do this before now it's just getting worse and I'm pissed off..

Quality > Quantity

This is my opinion anyways

EDIT:

Quote by Sickz
I've found when you stop chasing speed that's when it comes. I'm just focusing on playing well and relaxing, and the speed just come gradually.


This, this and this
Last edited by vayne92 at Apr 29, 2013,
#3
I practice until i can play whatever i am working on well. That is until:
1) It sounds good (Clean, accurate, even)
2) It feels good (Relaxed, i can breath properly doing it, i can control exactly what i am doing)

Just start at a tempo that you can do both 1) and 2) properly without a metronome and work from there. I am not saying to avoid the metronome, but getting whatever your working on into your hands seems to help at the start without a metronome in my opinion.

It takes as many sessions as it takes. I've found when you stop chasing speed that's when it comes. I'm just focusing on playing well and relaxing, and the speed just come gradually.
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Last edited by Sickz at Apr 29, 2013,
#4
Quote by Sickz
I practice until i can play whatever i am working on well. That is until:
1) It sounds good (Clean, accurate, even)
2) It feels good (Relaxed, i can breath properly doing it, i can control exactly what i am doing)

Just start at a tempo that you can do both 1) and 2) properly without a metronome and work from there. I am not saying to avoid the metronome, but getting whatever your working on into your hands seems to help at the start without a metronome in my opinion.

It takes as many sessions as it takes. I've found when you stop chasing speed that's when it comes. I'm just focusing on playing well and relaxing, and the speed just come gradually.

This, especially the whole playing without a metronome part. If your fingers don't know what to do at first, then you'll have to play it so slowly that you may even have trouble keeping the beat. Teach your fingers what to do first, break down what you're doing into parts, then use a metronome to work on keeping in time and connecting it all together. Or you can work on perfecting a specific part with a metronome before moving on to the next, whatever works for you.
#5
I've seen time and time again the key is to practice slow and make sure you get it 100% right with no tension, being completely relaxed.

My question is - how long do you practice like this, or how long is a practice "session?" Specifically - I came across a method of 5 "sessions" at 20-35% of max speed, 50% for 3, and continually increase.


The answer is "practice slow and make sure you get it 100% right with no tension, being completely relaxed."

You can't up the speed unless you're getting it 100% right with no tension. If you can play at a higher tempo than you started but you're still getting it "100% right with no tension" then you're still doing it right, it's just the tempo has changed.

This is my lesson on speed building.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoZ7JeChyQU
#6
Hour a day should be fine for building/maintaining technique, assuming you already have some basic playing ability. Break it into 3 or 4 chunks that really focus on various parts of your technique. I like to do 15 minutes of Right Hand only warm ups, 15 of Left Hand only (as in, not even picking), 15min arpeggios, 15min scales.
#7
It's important you get in the right mindset about this, you're not "practicing for speed", you're practicing to improve things like accuracy, control, timing and economy of motion. Those things will make you better at the technical aspects of playing the guitar, and as your technique improves that will enable you to play faster things more easily.

Don't rush and don't try to force things, if you "try" and play faster you'll just mess up and wont get any better.
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#8
I agree 100 % with the "stop chasing speed" , sorry maybe it sounds silly but ... when you practice a song, and you can't play it to the 100 % speed ... you have to practice to be able to play at the right tempo ... and so, you're "chasing speed".

Yeah ... :O
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