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#1
Hello you,

In English you say stuff like "I live in London", but what do other languages say? I'm interested especially if the preposition you use isn't "in".

This is for a uni project.

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#2
Dutch say in too. Ik woon in Amsterdam.
French use "dans", Germans use in.
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Last edited by Neo Evil11 at Apr 30, 2013,
#4
Quote by Neo Evil11
Dutch say in too. Ik woon in Amsterdam.
French use "dans", Germans use in.

But "dans" just translates as "in", right? Do you know any that use, like, "on" or something?

Thanks
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#5
Quote by McTodd
But "dans" just translates as "in", right? Do you know any that use, like, "on" or something?

Thanks

I think it translates literally into in yes. At least as far as I remember from French class.

edit:: Actually I'm wrong, they have several words for in.
They also use a and au.
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Last edited by Neo Evil11 at Apr 30, 2013,
#6
Japanese use "ni", which can take on meanings other than "in". Not sure how significant is that to you.
#7
'Ja zivim u Beogradu' -> 'I live in Belgrade' In Serbian.

u meaning in.
#8
Dans is more for being inside something, or enclosed (dans le foret, in the forest). In French it depends on whether you're talking about a country, or city, and whether it's masculine or femenine. So it'd be j'habite en anglaterre, for I live in England, but for London it's "J'habite a Londres".
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#9
I don't speak languages
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#10
vivo in Londonium
That's latin. Not sure about the declension for London, guessed.
EDIT: Translated the first time as I am in London. Oops.
Last edited by anvil is god at Apr 30, 2013,
#11
Quote by anvil is god
ego sum Londonium
That's latin. Not sure about the declension for London, guessed.

Londinium
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#12
Quote by McTodd
But "dans" just translates as "in", right? Do you know any that use, like, "on" or something?

Thanks

''dans'' means in
''à'' means at
''sur'' means on
''dessous'' means under
''à côté'' means beside
''en avant'' means in front
''en arrière'' means behind

And as per with French, about 90% of any words can have about 10 completely different meanings. And I'm not even gonna get into homophones, because they're a whole shit ton of them.
Last edited by metalblaster at Apr 30, 2013,
#14
Quote by desperatechris
The frase "I live in London" would be " æ bor i London din jævla hestkukk" in Norwegian.

How does that translate? Seems like a lot of words to replace 4 words in English.
#15
Languages weren't designed to all translate directly into each other. In Spanish, you could use "en" to mean in, but it's not that the words "en" and "in" mean the same thing, it's that they are two completely different words that seem to most closely resemble each other in their respective languages. I think that's worth keeping in mind, especially when you get to comparing non latin languages.
#16
Quote by kratos379
Languages weren't designed to all translate directly into each other. In Spanish, you could use "en" to mean in, but it's not that the words "en" and "in" mean the same thing, it's that they are two completely different words that seem to most closely resemble each other in their respective languages. I think that's worth keeping in mind, especially when you get to comparing non latin languages.

I assume that's the reason TS is researching it.
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#18
Yeah, "Yo vivo en london" in spanish.

En can mean "on" too, but it's pretty much a word for word match with English.
#20
Ma elan Londonis in Estonian. There isn't a word for "in" if you want to tell that you live in a city. London gets a -is in the end and that is it. Ma elan- I live, Londonis- in London
#21
Eu vivo no Porto.
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#22
Dutch is "Ik woon in Parijs."
In French you can say "J'habite à Paris" or "J'habite Paris."

edit: and Germans say "in" as well
Why did I change London into Paris
and now for something completely different..
Last edited by appletice at Apr 30, 2013,
#23
Chinga tu madre viviendo en London
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#24
Quote by metalblaster
How does that translate? Seems like a lot of words to replace 4 words in English.

Its harder to say sertain things in norwegian. It common to be twice as long as the english way.
#26
我住倫敦。/ Wo Zhu Zai Lun Dun

"I live at London" (literally), in Chinese Mandarin.
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

Last edited by Harmonius at Apr 30, 2013,
#27
Quote by anvil is god
vivo in Londonium
That's latin. Not sure about the declension for London, guessed.
EDIT: Translated the first time as I am in London. Oops.


Londinio, actually. The -um is nominative case, whereas 'in' needs either a dative or ablative case here. Both have the ending -o.
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#29
私は(が)、ロンドンに住んでいます。 (Polite)
Watashi wa(ga), Rondon ni sundeimasu.
I live in London,

Depending on how you were asked you switch between the two topic markers. If you want to emphasize information before the particle use "ga". If you want to emphasize the information before the particle use "wa". The "ni" particle can be used to indicate the locations of things or people when used in this context. "Ni" can be translated as "to" when indicating a destination. "Ni" is also used when a motion or action is directed at or onto an object or place.

However, if you're already the topic of the discussion.

ロンドンに住んでいます。
Rondon ni sundeimasu
Live in London
I live in London (Implied meaning)

In Japanese once the topic is stated you don't have to state it again.
Last edited by NothingRocks at Apr 30, 2013,
#31
I live in London.
Я живу в Лондоне.
Ich wohne in London.

Although in French, it's "J'habite à Londres", which is something more like "I live at London". I suppose you could say "J'habite dans Londres" but that sounds weird and would imply that you live deep in the city center.
#32
In Norwegian you use "in" or "on" depending on what kind of place you're talking about. For large cities, countries, etc. you would use "in", and for small towns and islands and similar places you use "on".
So, "I live in London or in Norway", but "I live on Iceland or on Hamar (a small Norwegian city)". Thought that might be the kind of thing you're looking for.
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#33
Quote by GuitarViking
In Norwegian you use "in" or "on" depending on what kind of place you're talking about. For large cities, countries, etc. you would use "in", and for small towns and islands and similar places you use "on".
So, "I live in London or in Norway", but "I live on Iceland or on Hamar (a small Norwegian city)". Thought that might be the kind of thing you're looking for.

Awesome. Extremely helpful, thanks!

Is the divide regulated by anything in particular? Say, local geography, or size, or what? Do you say "on Iceland" because it's an island, or does that not matter?

Also, thanks everyone! This has been pretty cool.

Also, srsly, Rondon?
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#34
Matame porque vivo en Londres.
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#35
Norwegian (standard / Eastern)

Jeg bor i London.

The funny thing is that several place names use "på" (on) instead of "i" (in) and there is no general rule except a few guidelines ("på" for islands, headlands, etc.)

EDIT: Ninja'd, but he's a bit off; as I said, there is no definite, exceptionless rule.

Quote by GuitarViking
In Norwegian you use "in" or "on" depending on what kind of place you're talking about. For large cities, countries, etc. you would use "in", and for small towns and islands and similar places you use "on".
So, "I live in London or in Norway", but "I live on Iceland or on Hamar (a small Norwegian city)". Thought that might be the kind of thing you're looking for.

People live _in_ Bjugn as well...and there is a reason you've probably never heard of Bjugn.

And regarding Japanese: "ni" (に can also be "indirect object".

ÆDIT:
Quote by NothingRocks
私は(が)、ロンドンに住んでいます。 (Polite)。

が(ga)「I live in London」
は(wa)「I live in London
At least, that's how I see it...
ERROR 0x45: Signature not found
Last edited by sfaune92 at Apr 30, 2013,
#36
"I dont want to ever live in London"

My native tongue.
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#38
In Italian:
Vivo a Londra.
Where "a" in this case means in, but can change depending on the sentence.

If the sentence was "I'm going to London", that would be translated as "Vado a Londra", so the verb determines the meaning of the preposition.

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#39
Quote by captainsnazz
Je vis à Paris


ICH WOHNE IN HITLERSTADT


i fukin liv in manc u cheeky bellend


Isn't german 'im'? If not, that explains why I got a D in my German GCSE.
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#40
Quote by sfaune92


が(ga)「I live in London」
は(wa)「I live in London
At least, that's how I see it...


Yep, I explained that in my post.

Also, yep! The characters for London are:

ロ - ン - ド - ン
Ro - n - do - n

The Japanese "r" sound isn't the same as the English "r" though. It's a weird mix of an English "r" and "l". The sound starts out like an "r", but ends with the "l".
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