#1
Does anyone have experience with this?

Mature Students are typically students who enroll in university on the grounds of their age, in case they haven't received their high school diploma. The minimum age can vary from university to university - typically from what I've read it's 18 to 25. They're usually required to take language assessment tests (or others specific to their respective fields).

I'm not really asking about specifics. I could use some experiences from someone who's done it, or knows someone who's done it. If you know what universities look for in such cases, if there's some way you can prepare ahead for it and so forth, share your knowledge here.
#2
Never heard of it. Here in the Netherlands everyone has a high school diploma.
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#3
Well clearly, for a mature student, its more than 18 'cos that is when you go there normally. The idea is to take people without the usual formal qualifications BUT who have experience. For example, someone with a trade qualification, like city and guilds, a good general education, and about 10 years experience doing a related job. When I was first at college (doing HND Electrical / Electronic Engineering (pre 1986 - so a degree equivalent) we had a mature student in our group who was about 35 he had no A levels but had ONC and ONDs in mechanical and electric engineering from night school. You want get in without some sort of qualification and what is accepted will vary. For example a bank employee will have banking examinations - so could apply for economics degree perhaps, a laywer's clerk might have some basic legal qualifications and the experience to get into a law degree.

One university which takes a whole load of mature students and issues respected degrees is the OU

http://www.open.ac.uk

Hope this helps.
Last edited by PSimonR at Apr 30, 2013,
#4
Quote by Neo Evil11
Never heard of it. Here in the Netherlands everyone has a high school diploma.

"73% of adults aged 25-64 have earned the equivalent of a high-school degree, "

do you not count 27% of your population as people or somethin'
#5
Quote by Weaponized
"73% of adults aged 25-64 have earned the equivalent of a high-school degree, "

do you not count 27% of your population as people or somethin'

27% is foreign , 60 years old and/or mentally ******ed. I don't count those people.

You can't drop out of school till you are 16, and recently till you are 18.
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#7
I was 34 when I went back to school. The admissions registrar wanted to see my HS transcripts and SAT scores. I just said "bitch please".
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#8
Quote by PSimonR
Well clearly, for a mature student, its more than 18 'cos that is when you go there normally. The idea is to take people without the usual formal qualifications BUT who have experience. For example, someone with a trade qualification, like city and guilds, a good general education, and about 10 years experience doing a related job. When I was first at college (doing HND Electrical / Electronic Engineering (pre 1986 - so a degree equivalent) we had a mature student in our group who was about 35 he had no A levels but had ONC and ONDs in mechanical and electric engineering from night school. You want get in without some sort of qualification and what is accepted will vary. For example a bank employee will have banking examinations - so could apply for economics degree perhaps, a laywer's clerk might have some basic legal qualifications and the experience to get into a law degree.

One university which takes a whole load of mature students and issues respected degrees is the OU

http://www.open.ac.uk

Hope this helps.

Thanks for the info man.


I'm going to have to give this some thought. Obviously biting the bullet and finding some sort of alternative, non-traditional program to earn a high school diploma is an option I haven't ruled out. But if I can avoid that and get in on what I know I'd be pretty happy haha.
#9
my mother got her degree at 51.

half my degree class in uni were 21-30.

In this country the uni doesn't really care/change from under 21 applicants because you still qualify for loans/support and get charged the same if it's your first degree.

I think if you're above 30 they don't care as much about school grades (here at least) because older school qualifications don't match up with current ones. So it's down to a basic interview, to check you can speak the right language and aren't dodgy. I'm guessing the higher end universities might give a basic maths/literacy test for certain degrees since they'd ignore the qualifications.


though if you're asking about how they'd treat someone without a high school diploma/equivalent, that's something different. I'd assume every university would given at least a basic maths/literacy test and then maybe a more advanced test for particular subjects (covering stuff you would've learned at school level) Not many degrees really need existing knowledge of the subject though.
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#10
I'm actually a mature student right now, 26 and in my 2nd year of university in the UK.

I think the best advice I can give you would be to look at the degree you want to do, find places that offer it and ask them about their policies on mature students. Some places might not want to take mature students these days since there's a lot of students around in general but other places will be very forthcoming with what they expect and want to see from you.

Once you know what they want from you, getting it is an easy process. To get to where I am now I basically had to go back and do A-level education again and get it right but that's what it took so that's what I did. Now sometimes people ask about my school grades for some things (I'm doing a year's internship as part of my degree) but all that happens then is I explain my situation and everyone's really fine with it.

Of course it helps that I'm good at what I do.
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#11
There are plenty of people on my course who are like infinity bajillion years old and get on fine, don't you worry.
Most of the people I've lived with in halls have been 'mature' students. I'd say 21+, so more than 2 gap years.
You're gonna have to deal with 18 year olds again and that'll be the worst bit. I'd say you're even more cut out for starting uni later on, 18 year olds just join and fµck about their whole time there.

edit: they all had gcses though
#12
also, my business school had a lot of foreign students whose qualifications were incompatible from our own. due to the nature of the degrees, they didn't mind about existing knowledge beyond a maths test at the start to determine what maths tutorial group to place people in. people were accepted on the back of application statements and interviews. it's #2 for in UK for business, so it's not like it's taking anybody. although, foreign/non-eu students have to pay a lot more so maybe they are just happy to be lax with them.
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#13
Quote by PSimonR
One university which takes a whole load of mature students and issues respected degrees is the OU

http://www.open.ac.uk

Hope this helps.

At what level is for example their BSc. (honours) Mathematics? Can you compare it to a degree from a normal university?

I really don't understand this level2, level 3, honours stuff.
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#14
Quote by Neo Evil11
At what level is for example their BSc. (honours) Mathematics? Can you compare it to a degree from a normal university?

I really don't understand this level2, level 3, honours stuff.


The OU is a fully fledged university, a degree you get from there is theoretically worth as much as a degree from any other university. Of course it doesn't quite work that way in reality, try looking here for more info on UK based unis: http://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/the-open-university
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#15
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
The OU is a fully fledged university, a degree you get from there is theoretically worth as much as a degree from any other university. Of course it doesn't quite work that way in reality, try looking here for more info on UK based unis: http://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/the-open-university

It's not so much questioning their legitimacy, we have an OU here in the Netherlands and it is decent.

My problem was more that I don't understand the English system for higher education. Here we have 3 levels, where University is the highest level.
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#16
Quote by Neo Evil11
It's not so much questioning their legitimacy, we have an OU here in the Netherlands and it is decent.

My problem was more that I don't understand the English system for higher education. Here we have 3 levels, where University is the highest level.


A BSc from the OU is identical to one from any other institute (or as identical as any other two BScs are at least).
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#17
OK IMO, and I do interview grads for jobs with a top UK company, OU degree = degree from an middle rated uni, probably better than, say, a former technical college (like Derby) or a some former polytechnics (e.g. Nottingham Trent) but obviously not as good as top flight e.g. Oxford or even LSE. Perhaps a good as, say, Brunel. Very much subject dependent too.

Levels: at age 18/19 we don't have a Bac or High School Diploma - mostly we have people with 3 to 5 A levels in particular subjects. At 21/22/24 they get a university degree, BA or BSC with a grade. (3 or 4 years study, more for medicine etc). Then they can do a MA or MSc masters degree and go onto a research based PhD - age 26/7 minimum.
.
Last edited by PSimonR at Apr 30, 2013,