#1
honestly if i knew more terminology it would be so helpful asking this question because it's really not complicated at all.... but just bear with me please -- from now on everything in italics is me doing my best to describe what i'm talking about. the link to the musics right bellow

http://web.mit.edu/gcollver/www/GCJtch/Plucking_arpeggio/Pdf_files/plucking_arpeggio_study.pdf

#1
the c & e "chord" that repeats over and over again in the beginning -- when two of them are "tied" together, how exactly do i play that?

#2
beginning in the "33rd measure" when it shows one "stem" and 2 notes (one on each side of the stem & one of them being a half and the other being a quarter) how exactly do i play that? it's always the same note on each side of the stem so its not a chord... i used to play piano (a while ago) and i never saw that notation before
#2
Quote by tall011
honestly if i knew more terminology it would be so helpful asking this question because it's really not complicated at all.... but just bear with me please -- from now on everything in italics is me doing my best to describe what i'm talking about. the link to the musics right bellow
#1
the c & e "chord" that repeats over and over again in the beginning -- when two of them are "tied" together, how exactly do i play that?
The ties indicate a "hold". You only play the first set, and hold through the second. I think it's customary to notate it like that when the hold runs through the beginning of the next measure.

Quote by tall011
#2
beginning in the "33rd measure" when it shows one "stem" and 2 notes (one on each side of the stem & one of them being a half and the other being a quarter) how exactly do i play that? it's always the same note on each side of the stem so its not a chord... i used to play piano (a while ago) and i never saw that notation before
This is a guess but, the only way you could play that figure would be on a stringed instrument at the point of string unison. Play the open note and its fretted counterpart together, and release the fretted string sooner.

Like I said, that's a guess, but it's the only way I see that happening.