#1
Just wondering if anyone has an answer to this.

I know there are, on rare occasions, electric guitar amps with eqs but why are tone controls so common instead, even on high end amps?
#2
I suppose it's a more traditional approach. Besides, low Hz settings on a graphic eq aren't going to change the bass frequencies the same way a bass knob does.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#3
Plus, I'd say most guitarists are pretty happy with the capabilities of the current tone controls to not need a graphic EQ.
LesPaul
Pedals
OrangeRocker30
My band
PBT Native: Resident Graphics Monkey

#4
A 5e3 only needs a tone knob.

Some amps only have on knob.

Some amps have lots of knob.

Some people don't even need an amp. The acoustic properties of the instrument sounds good already.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#5
A lot of amp makers like to make their amp sound as good as possible without putting things in the circuit that could mess up the base tone. They give you an effects loop for that purpose and an EQ pedal can do amazing things there.

Not all companies though, a lot of Mesa amps have that crazy EQ that makes them extremely versatile.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#6
It seems like a fully parametric EQ is not something guitarists are asking for. If the majority of guitarists are not happy with their tone, usually the best way to fix that is to change amps. If anything, there are semi-parametric EQ pedals out there but are not very popular anyway.

To be honest, the only time I ever needed a fully parametric EQ is for recording where I need to change a small range of frequencies to sit in nicely with the rest of the mix. I don't think I have felt like I "needed" one for a guitar by itself.
If Rock is a life-style, then Metal's an addiction

Yelloooow!


Of The


UG Challenge

#7
Most people can't handle 3 EQ controls properly.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#8
Quote by Cathbard
Most people can't handle 3 EQ controls properly.


Quoted for truth. I'm convinced this is why people love 6505s. You really have to try to make it sound bad. Same goes for many "classic" amps, all the old Marshalls I've tried sounded awesome with everything at 10
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#9
Quote by LazyLatinoRocke
It seems like a fully parametric EQ is not something guitarists are asking for. If the majority of guitarists are not happy with their tone, usually the best way to fix that is to change amps. If anything, there are semi-parametric EQ pedals out there but are not very popular anyway.

To be honest, the only time I ever needed a fully parametric EQ is for recording where I need to change a small range of frequencies to sit in nicely with the rest of the mix. I don't think I have felt like I "needed" one for a guitar by itself.

Sorry to be a dick, but...

Parametric = controls that have a variable frequency (and usually a variable Q factor) which you sweep with a rotary pot and then adjust the gain with a separate rotary pot.

I'm fairly certain you mean graphic EQ's instead, which are the faders that correspond to particular frequencies each, despite the name graphic implying that the frequency response is shown on a graph so you can analyse the equalisation.

Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#10
Quote by SimplyBen
Plus, I'd say most guitarists are pretty happy with the capabilities of the current tone controls to not need a graphic EQ.

See, the thing is that is how I felt at first until I started using one. I find it actually easier to shape the tone into something I love.

It has been a bit of a necessity though for me while I'm using my $60 amp (tube is out for repair), its amazing how much better sounds I can get.
#11
Bunch of fucking pussies! gimme a volume knob and I'm set, the rest can be done from the guitar. Maybe y'all should learn how a fuckin' tone knob is meant to be used!

JK, but honestly, I'm perfectly content with a volume and tone to roll off any piercing highs on an amp. The 3-band is nice though because you can cut the bass freqs some to keep the speakers from woofing, a necessity on an open back twin. I prefer amps without a presence control too, I always have trouble dialing them in just right.

A 6/10/15 band eq can work wonders on the worst of amps when adjusted by ear to taste though.
Last edited by tukk04 at May 2, 2013,