#1
This problem occurs mostly on both of the E strings. I just put new strings on literally an hour ago. I tuned it up about half way, let the guitar sit for 15 minutes or so, then tuned it up the rest of the way. It seems like both of my E strings tune down if I play for about 5 seconds or if I'm tuning other strings. I can't seem to figure out the problem. Normally, I would just keep tuning it back up as needed, however, I have had experiences in the past where the string would break before I even had it tuned high enough. I have a Martin DX1AE guitar and D'Addario EJ16 strings. Thanks for reading!
#2
This is a common problem with new strings, i'm assuming you're new with guitar. Strings (Especially nylon) need to break in before you can actually play anything. Usually it will take anywhere from 2 days-a week to break in and hold there tune for as long as regular strings, however i've had strings that are good right when you put them on, and strings that are awful for even up to a month.

I
I've found the breakin process can be sped up by tuning up 1/2 a semitone, to 1 semitone. Let it sit for a good 30 minutes or so, make a bagel or something. Come back, and see exactly how sharp/flat each of the strings are. Take note, the superflat ones, i want you to tune back up to be 1 semitone higher than normal, If they got down to almost normal pitch, tune them up to be 1/2 semitone above normal, and if they stay sharp, tune them back down to standard, you're done with those strings.

This is always a tedious process, but you'll get used to it as you adjust guitars.
#3
is it possible that you didn't install the strings quite right? a friend of mine always did it wrong, and his strings kept slipping, usually till i took them off and restrung the guitar. or it could be that your tuners need replacing. do you gently stretch the strings after you install them?

btw, unless you're tuning the E strings till they're turned to higher notes than they're supposed to be, they won't be higher tension.
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#4
First, pick one of the many online tutorials on re-stringing (Taylor has a nice one) and make sure you're doing it right as Patti says.
Second, after your strings are installed, give 'em a little stretch. By little, I mean a LITTLE. Put your finger under each string and pull it lightly away from the fretboard and then run your finger down the string.
Helps a little. I find that new medium-gauge steel strings need very little break in. An hour of playing will usually take care of things.
Nylon strings, on the other hand, take forever....
#5
Like what was mentioned, this is common with new strings. When changing strings for a show, most players will changes them a day or so before and play them quite a bit to stretch them out and settle them in.
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#6
You might tighten the little tension screws on the side of the tuning knobs, if you have any. That keeps the tuners from slipping backwards from the pull of the strings.
Last edited by Prescott_Player at May 11, 2013,
#7
Quote by Bikewer
...[ ]...Second, after your strings are installed, give 'em a little stretch. By little, I mean a LITTLE. Put your finger under each string and pull it lightly away from the fretboard and then run your finger down the string....[ ]....


You can also just play and do some bends while your at it. Push up on the high strings, pull down on the bass strings. So, you get the strings stretched in, and a little bit of work on your technique at the same time..
#8
ShoeLace1291
Basically what I've found out is, you're gonna have to do two things.
A. You're gonna have to stretch the strings from the 12th fret of the e string. A slow plucking motion should be followed, while the string is in tune. This will detune your string but if you repeat it, it'll reach a point where it's stretched which means it won't fall out of tune
B. Tune it to about 2 half tones up and start playing, it will continue to drop, but once the tuning drops while playing, your strings would have stretched enough.
Works for me Everytime
#9
All of the above and a technique for winding on the post.  I like to leave the string loose enough at the start to result in  2 full winds on the post.  Hold the string about 4" above the fretboard at the 12th.  Then bend the wound strings at the post hole after it passes through the hole, counter to the direction of winding (if winding counter clockwise, bend it clockwise).   I pass the unwound strings through the hole twice.
Depending on how I like the tension (whether the string ends up higher or lower on the post) the first wind should pass under or over the string entrance to the post hole and the next turn the opposite.  This results in a bend or double pass through with a squeeze lock, they ain't slippin'!
Need to also be sure the ball end is under the bridge and not pulling up on the pin and that the string is centered in the pin slot.
#10
Quote by Bikewer
First, pick one of the many online tutorials on re-stringing (Taylor has a nice one) and make sure you're doing it right as Patti says.
Second, after your strings are installed, give 'em a little stretch.  By little, I mean a LITTLE.  Put your finger under each string and pull it lightly away from the fretboard and then run your finger down the string.   
Helps a little.   I find that new medium-gauge steel strings need very little break in.  An hour of playing will usually take care of things.
Nylon strings, on the other hand, take forever....

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