#1
I've seen guitars with 25.4 inch scales, 25.5, 25 and 9/16, and 25.6...not counting the lower scales, such as 3/4 and 24.75. My question is, do these small differences really mean anything, or do companies do it just to be unique? I myself haven't noticed any differences...I'm just curious to see if anybody else has.
#2
some companies (particularly the older ones) started with a particular scale at a time when they had no concern with what other companies were doing and kept using it. others use a certain scale because some bodies have a slightly different length and they still want the bridge at the sweet spot. and i'm just guessing on this one, but others might have used a little different scale to avoid accusations of copying another manufacturer.
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#3
Quote by rotoball95
I've seen guitars with 25.4 inch scales, 25.5, 25 and 9/16, and 25.6...not counting the lower scales, such as 3/4 and 24.75. My question is, do these small differences really mean anything, or do companies do it just to be unique? I myself haven't noticed any differences...I'm just curious to see if anybody else has.
The longer the scale, the more string tension it requires to bring it up to pitch.

However, 1/16" of an inch shouldn't make a noticeable difference. I expect that a few thousandths of a inch in action height would make a far greater impact on playability.

However, when you jump from Gibson standard 24.75" scales to 25.5 Fender standards, the increased string tension put a fair amount more energy into the soundboards of large body guitars.

The 24.75 in scales on many electrics seem to give the drop tuning guys fits though, due to lack of string tension. (You need to put on heavier strings).

I thought I saw a Taylor @ 26.0" scale, but I could have been hallucinating. (Like that's ever happened to me)...
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 3, 2013,