#1
Anyone want to help me with my guitar tones (: ?

Equiptment:
Peavey 6505
Korg Chromatic Tuner
An ISP DECIMATOR Noise Supressor
And a Maxon OD-808!
Agile 7 string
I also own a Ec-1000

Im wondering if I can get a Within the ruins or just a brutal tone, what % i should move the nob on my ISP, and what order should connect my pedals..

Guitar > Tuner > ISP > Maxon > Head ???
#2
First, what are you amp settings and the settings you use on your Maxon OD?
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#3
Buy a Marshall MG.

...

Ahem.


I wouldn't even use the Maxon. Assuming both of your guitars have high-output pickups, the 6505 shouldn't need much (if any) boosting.

You do need to make sure you have appropriate speakers, for starters. No matter what the rest of your gear is, you're not going to get a very "brutal" tone out of a single Greenback. There's a whole world of speakers out there and you've not said what you currently have, so we'll leave it at that for now.

If you just want to make the floor shake and sound as big as possible, max the bass control, set the treble around 66-75% and the mids at 50-66%. Now crank the volume before you set your gain. You don't get "brutal" tones without putting out a lot of volume; you need that power amp compression. So get the overall volume up first, then dial in gain until you get where you want. You'll not need as much gain as you think you do. Realistically, I'd be surprised if you find yourself wanting to put the gain anywhere past 60%.

For the ISP, it really depends where you get the most noise. You'll probably find it does best int he effects loop of your amp, taking the noise down after the preamp has done its thing. ISP's noise reduction products are really heavy-handed so using them to quieten the guitar signal is rarely a good idea. Start with the threshold knob as low as it goes then slowly increase it until you hit the point where you don't hear any noise at all; now take it back a tiny bit. You don't want noise reduction to be at the point where it's silencing the noise 100%, because then it will also be chopping off a bit of the signal you do want. You want it sitting right before that point, so it gets rid of most of the noise but not so much that it messes with your sound.

... And it's spelt 'knob'. 'Nob' is something quite different.
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#4
I would think that turning that rig to "on" would give you a brutal tone.


In all seriousness, I'm assuming you're using the lead channel, right? Do you have a head or is it the 6505+ combo?

I would recommend still using your Maxon boost, but set as a boost only. (Gain to almost zero, volume almost maxed; tone to taste). It should be the first thing your guitar lead goes into. It's not that you really need it as a boost or for more gain -- it's what it does to your tone that's desirable. You will also need to reduce the preamp gain on your amp for this to work. Depending on your pickups, you might only need your preamp gain at around 2-4 to get the optimal tone.

Next, EQ the thing properly. Keep your mids at a healthy level -- that's where the "punch" comes from. I run mine at bass 7, mids 4.5, and treble 4.5-5 depending on where my post gain (volume) is set. Play around with your resonance and presence knobs. Resonance plays a huge role in heavy palm mutes, but you don't want to overdo it. I run my presence almost all the way off -- I find that all it does is add fizz.

Finally, if you've got money, I'd highly recommend an EQ pedal. That will allow you to tailor your tone exactly how you want it.
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#5
Too much bass just turns into flab. You do want tightness, right?

Your ISP should be set just high enough to take out the background noise. You should still be able to get the amp to feed back.

Noise gates are no substitute for proper muting technique.
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#6
I would turn the gain down to about 3 on the lead channel, boost the front end hard with your overdrive. Guitar > Tuner > Overdrive > Noise Gate > Amp. No idea about noise gate settings, set it so that it works is the obvious answer I would have thought.

Rest is playing technique, experiment with how and where you place your hand with palm mutes, the angle of attack on your pick, its more important than all of the stuff I just said related to your gear/settings.
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#7
^Yeah a lot of it really is technique. I can sound heavy as **** on pretty much any setup, but then again, I have been playing extreme metal for, well, about 10 years now.
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because that's where you'll find me..."
#8
Also don't forget layering. A lot of recorded brutal heavy guitar tones come from the guitar being layered several times. As a general rule I usually record 4 tracks of the same part, but there are situations where 8 tracks are not uncommon.

Most of the advice given in this thread has been solid. Use the Maxon as a boost (gain down, volume up), leave some mids in your EQ, and even turn the amp up. You'll feel much more punch and grunt if your amp is fired up properly.
#9
^^+69

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#10
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
Too much bass just turns into flab. You do want tightness, right?
This is a 6505 we're talking about. So long as OP's got even vaguely suitable speakers, they can't not get a tight tone.
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#11
Don't go overboard with the layering. It more often leads to muddiness than anything else. If you learn to get a good guitar tone then 2 tracks with a good bass tone behind it is usually enough. 4 tracks at most if you have lots of time.

With such a rig it actually takes effort to get a bad tone man.
#13
currently im plugged into amp>tuner>maxon>isp>guitar.
Not sure if i should do it in that order or if i should switch my amp and guitar cords.
#14
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
^Yeah a lot of it really is technique. I can sound heavy as **** on pretty much any setup, but then again, I have been playing extreme metal for, well, about 10 years now.


+1 i can make my Traynor YCV40 sound heavy if i wanted! of course it needs to be loud as #$%^!
#15
Quote by Dan_5893
Also don't forget layering. A lot of recorded brutal heavy guitar tones come from the guitar being layered several times. As a general rule I usually record 4 tracks of the same part, but there are situations where 8 tracks are not uncommon.

Most of the advice given in this thread has been solid. Use the Maxon as a boost (gain down, volume up), leave some mids in your EQ, and even turn the amp up. You'll feel much more punch and grunt if your amp is fired up properly.

I do 4 parts per ear.
4 panned about 70-80% right, and 4 70-80% left

OT:
A LOT of heaviness comes from your picking.
REALLY dig into the strings when playing, and especially palm muting.
Make sure you have a pretty heavy handed palm mute, especially when down picking.

Something I do to make something heavier is palm mute the entire power chord as opposed to just the root.
Last edited by darkwolf291 at May 10, 2013,