#1
I have an audition in a few days for a university program... I know how to do all of these (following) techniques, but I still don't fully understand what they want.

 Scales: major in at least six keys; G, D and A for the sharp keys and F, B flat and E flat for the
flat keys; minor (both harmonic and melodic minor) in at least six keys; E, B and F sharp for
the sharp keys and D, G and C for the flat keys.
 Arpeggios: minimum major and dominant seventh in at least six keys; G, D and A for the
sharp keys and F, B flat and E flat for the flat keys.
 The Jazz Modes: in at least six keys; G, D and A for the sharp keys and F, B flat and E flat for
the flat keys.

Firstly, the scales. What is the point in displaying major/minor in different keys if the finger positions are the exact same? I have the same confusion with Arpeggios. If you can do one key you can do them all, so why say "minimum 6 keys, preferably 12"? Lastly "Jazz Modes"... I wasn't aware these even existed. Are they just referring to Ionian/Dorian/Phrygian/Lydian/Mixolydian/Aeolian/Locrian? Because I only knew them as modes, not jazz modes... and again, they ask for "minimum 6 keys, preferably 12". The only reason I'm asking these questions is I expect somebody to tell me "You're way off, you need to learn __________ and __________ in one day". Anyways, thanks in advance. Sorry for the dumb questions.
#2
Quote by hotdogohyeah
I have an audition in a few days for a university program... I know how to do all of these (following) techniques, but I still don't fully understand what they want.

 Scales: major in at least six keys; G, D and A for the sharp keys and F, B flat and E flat for the
flat keys; minor (both harmonic and melodic minor) in at least six keys; E, B and F sharp for
the sharp keys and D, G and C for the flat keys.
 Arpeggios: minimum major and dominant seventh in at least six keys; G, D and A for the
sharp keys and F, B flat and E flat for the flat keys.
 The Jazz Modes: in at least six keys; G, D and A for the sharp keys and F, B flat and E flat for
the flat keys.

Firstly, the scales. What is the point in displaying major/minor in different keys if the finger positions are the exact same? I have the same confusion with Arpeggios. If you can do one key you can do them all, so why say "minimum 6 keys, preferably 12"? Lastly "Jazz Modes"... I wasn't aware these even existed. Are they just referring to Ionian/Dorian/Phrygian/Lydian/Mixolydian/Aeolian/Locrian? Because I only knew them as modes, not jazz modes... and again, they ask for "minimum 6 keys, preferably 12". The only reason I'm asking these questions is I expect somebody to tell me "You're way off, you need to learn __________ and __________ in one day". Anyways, thanks in advance. Sorry for the dumb questions.


You need to learn things in different keys so you are capable of playing the same thing in different positions on the fret board. It does make a difference where you are on the neck to how you play, it's only a small difference but it is something you need to be aware of and compensate for. Also different keys will incorporate different open strings. Also you need to be aware of the differences that different tonalities will have on your playing. Ideally you want to be practicing as much of this theory stuff over a backing in the appropriate key and getting as much of the sound in your head as you can since without knowing the sound of all these things they're entirely useless anyway.

Much the same with arpeggios, except there's many more of them you need to learn. I'll expand on that in a minute.

Finally: ignore modes. You don't need them. If you learn the major and minor scales really well up and down the fretboard in all the different keys you won't need the modes. If you start getting in to funky jazz soloing then you might need to learn the fingerings for some of the more esoteric scales but if you get to that point then you'll know and you shouldn't need to ask someone what you need to learn. This is why I said there are many more arpeggios you will probably want to learn; where there are really only two scales I think you need, there are at least 7 different arpeggios (triads and 7ths) in just those two scales.
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#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
You need to learn things in different keys so you are capable of playing the same thing in different positions on the fret board. It does make a difference where you are on the neck to how you play, it's only a small difference but it is something you need to be aware of and compensate for. Also different keys will incorporate different open strings. Also you need to be aware of the differences that different tonalities will have on your playing. Ideally you want to be practicing as much of this theory stuff over a backing in the appropriate key and getting as much of the sound in your head as you can since without knowing the sound of all these things they're entirely useless anyway.

Much the same with arpeggios, except there's many more of them you need to learn. I'll expand on that in a minute.

Finally: ignore modes. You don't need them. If you learn the major and minor scales really well up and down the fretboard in all the different keys you won't need the modes. If you start getting in to funky jazz soloing then you might need to learn the fingerings for some of the more esoteric scales but if you get to that point then you'll know and you shouldn't need to ask someone what you need to learn. This is why I said there are many more arpeggios you will probably want to learn; where there are really only two scales I think you need, there are at least 7 different arpeggios (triads and 7ths) in just those two scales.


About different tonalities, I figured as much; I can explore those further than I have been. On modes, I've already known I.D.P.L.M.A.L. for some time now, so no worries there. The only bit was the "Jazz" modes that had me go "wait, what..."

I suppose I'll focus more on arpeggios, then. Thanks for the help.