#1
Hey guys, my local guitar shop has a used Taylor 110 for sale for $375. I played around with it yesterday and it felt nice but I couldn't really hear it over the electric guitars around me. I looked it over and it had some normal wear (scratches, etc...). It also had a plug in the side to hook it up to an amp but it didn't have a pickup installed on it that I could tell.

Is this a good deal? Should I try to talk him down a little more or should I just buy a new guitar in this price range? I am by no means a good player, but I would like to have a nicer acoustic. The fender I have now is a hand me down that has the bridge glued back on with wood glue which makes the action extremely high and hard to play.

Also, it said that it was made in Mexico. Is this normal? I thought Taylors were made in the USA? Sorry for the long post and I hope these questions aren't stupid. Thanks for reading.
#2
I think the price is pretty solid for what you'd be getting. It's part of their lower line of guitars, the 100 series, but it's still a very good beginner-intermediate instrument. Since it's in that 100 series, it's made in Mexico, and it's not until the 300 series (I think, could be wrong) that they start making them in the U.S. Regardless, for what it sounds like you're looking for, it seems like it'd be a really good fit.
#3
Thanks for the reply. Yeah I think I'm going to take the plunge on it in the next day or two. It is amazing how much easier it is to play than my fender. I just wish I could have heard how it sounded. Do you think the plug in jack will affect the sound much?
#4
Taylor 110's sound nice to me. I have one sitting around and use it for quick practice all the time. New they go for $650USD with a ussual 15% or so - $100 discount. $375 seems fair especially since they don't come stock with electronics, at least mine didn't.
#5
most music shops have a music(sometimes its a lessons room) room that you can quietly try it out in. $375 does seem to be a fair price. does it come with the taylor gigbag? if it has a 1/4" jack, it's probably a 110e or 110ce if it has a cutaway. a lot of people prefer the sound of the 100 series over the 200's. i haven't tried them side by side yet.
i am gradually learning to like the distinctive sound of Taylors more and more. taking the Taylor tour next week when i go to San Diego to see friends. that should be fun.
#6
It has a jack, but I think someone installed it after they bought the guitar. There is no cutaway and I looked the guitar over and didn't see any onboard controls like you would normally find on an acoustic-electric. I don't know if it comes with the gig bag or not. Honestly I would prefer a hard case anyway so that doesn't really bother me if it doesn't.
#7
the bag would be a nice bonus. that 110 should do you for a while until the ever-needed upgrade. enjoy it and don't forget to post a HNGD when you get it.
#9
Happy New Guitar Day.
takes some pics and share with us. all of us regulars like to see new candy. we love and appreciate just about any new guitar( with a few disdainful exceptions). i dont post many HNGD's, i trade or sell 'em off too quickly, they'd be gone before the pics were uploaded. i think i've only done one, but most dont go thru as many as i.
#10
Oh I see. Haha. I'll be happy to post pictures when I get it if I don't talk myself out of it first. I have a hard time letting go of money LOL. That's why I've been dealing with my crappy fender for so long.
#12
sounds like a pretty good deal.

btw, if the taylor is easier to play than your fender, chances are good that your fender needs a set up or the strings are heavier - or both.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#13
Yeah I'm sure the fender could use a set up but I don't know how much it would help. Like I said, the bridge has fallen off at some point and whoever fixed it just used a ton of wood glue to glue it back on so now the bridge sits higher on the guitar than it should.
#15
exorcism *LOLOL*

slash0102 - just buy the taylor before someone else does!!! if you can talk the guy down or get him to give you a case, great. if not, it's still a good deal on a guitar that feels great when you play it, and that'll not only make you play more, but probably help you play better.

go - buy the guitar
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#16
if you don't like it or feel guilty about spending the money...pm me. or if you...umm...ahh...you know, need "my guy", pm about that...nobody will know whatever happened to the fender but the 2 of us...shhh...
#17
I am going to try to stop by there tomorrow and talk to them about it. I don't think I am going to perform an "exorcism" on the fender haha. I think I'll keep it for sentimental value. I haven't played it in forever since I have a nice electric, but it might make a good project one day who knows.
#18
Quote by slash0102
Yeah I'm sure the fender could use a set up but I don't know how much it would help. Like I said, the bridge has fallen off at some point and whoever fixed it just used a ton of wood glue to glue it back on so now the bridge sits higher on the guitar than it should.
Well then you'll have to shave the saddle down. Hopefully there's enough "white" sticking out above the bridge proper to drop the strings to where they need to be.

I might surprise you to know that an inexpensive guitar can be made to play as well as a very costly instrument. As long as the neck is on at the proper angle, it falls mainly to the string height and gauge to determine to playability of the guitar, not the price.

So, no need to write the Fender off just yet. Perhaps with a good setup, it could be a backup, a beater, or a campfire guitar, with very little difference in feel from whatever you pickup next.

With a cheap guitar, some issues you might find are rough ends on the frets, or perhaps a high fret, which might prohibit you from getting the action as low as possible. But with that said, mass production and CNC techniques can insure instruments that are right on spec at reasonable prices.

In fact, a cheap guitar might have a neck width or neck profile that works better with your anatomy, than a high end Martin or Taylor.

You pay for sound, but you also pay a penalty for the name on the headstock, and that can influence the "bang for your buck" factor. Sadly, you also pay a penalty for the American worker's pay scale. So, I wouldn't worry about where my new guitar comes from. Many companies with prestigious reputations to uphold, keep a close watch on QC in their offshore manufacturing facilities. So, a Mexican Taylor, is still a Taylor, the guys that made it, just got paid a tad less than their American counterparts for the same job.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 11, 2013,
#19
I may end up trying to do that with my fender. I don't know much about doing modifications, but that's the wonderful thing about this place. There's a ton of knowledgeable people here.
#21
I went by there today and talked to them about it. I didn't get to stay long though because they were closing. Apparently someone has installed a pickup in it though. I didn't get a chance to plug it in but the guy told me it works. It has to be something that someone has installed after they got it though because it is just a 110. Anyway, how does an acoustic pickup work? I couldn't even see it. I figured that the pickup would have to be located under the strings but apparently not?
#22
I forgot to mention I stopped at another store on my way home and they have a Washburn wd15s and wd15sce for about the same price. I liked this guitar as well (only played the wd15s). The action on it actually seems to be lower than the action on the Taylor. It also sounded comparable to the Taylor to my untrained ears, but I thought I would get some of your opinions. I can get the Washburn new off of musicians friend for $299.
#23
Quote by slash0102
I forgot to mention I stopped at another store on my way home and they have a Washburn wd15s and wd15sce for about the same price. I liked this guitar as well (only played the wd15s). The action on it actually seems to be lower than the action on the Taylor. It also sounded comparable to the Taylor to my untrained ears, but I thought I would get some of your opinions. I can get the Washburn new off of musicians friend for $299.
I went into this at some length earlier. A factory setup more often than not , has to be tweaked.

Your guide for this should be how much of the white plastic "saddle" is visible over the wood of the bridge. A little experience will allow you to judge how much adjustment is available, and even if the neck has been set correctly.

So, this is an example of what I told you earlier, a lower priced instrument can be made to play asd well as a more expensive one.

The one caveat is this, if the Washburn doesn't have much saddle adjustment left, then the action is likely as low as it's ever going to be, and new guitars sometimes settle in.

The sound, look, and feel of the guitar is really all that matters, not the price. With that said, take your time to let all the facts and sounds sink in, before you make your final decision.

As to the pickup in the Taylor, it's probably either an under saddle peizo strip pickup, or a "stick me on type", which is attached directly to the underside of the bridge. You'll need to put a small mirror in the body the verify the latter, or take the strings off to see if it's the under saddle peizo type.
#24
Ok that makes sense. Yeah I am trying not to rush into things. As I said earlier, I have a nice electric so if the Taylor gets sold before I can make up my mind I still have a guitar to play. I just want to have a nicer acoustic. I am thinking about seeing what I can do to my fender tonight. I think that it needs a truss rod adjustment from looking down the neck. How do I go about doing this? Any pointers? And as for the Washburn's action, I don't think that I would want it to be any lower than it currently is. The Taylor I think I would. I appreciate everybody's input so far.
#25
Quote by slash0102
Ok that makes sense. Yeah I am trying not to rush into things. As I said earlier, I have a nice electric so if the Taylor gets sold before I can make up my mind I still have a guitar to play. I just want to have a nicer acoustic. I am thinking about seeing what I can do to my fender tonight. I think that it needs a truss rod adjustment from looking down the neck. How do I go about doing this? Any pointers? And as for the Washburn's action, I don't think that I would want it to be any lower than it currently is. The Taylor I think I would. I appreciate everybody's input so far.
OK look, the quickest way to check the action height wanted against the available adjustment is this; barre the guitar at the 12th fret. Don't push all the way down. Simply depress the strings to the height you'd like the action to be. (normally this would be about a 1/10" to 1/8" string height above the 12th fret). (Measuring from top of fret to bottom of string).

Now generally, all the strings will be going at an upward angle toward the bridge. So then, to make that upward angle "go away", you sand down the bottom of the saddle to make the strings go straight to the bridge, with the action still at the same height as you have it fingered .

See if there is sufficient saddle above the bridge, so that if you sand down the saddle, you'll still have some plastic above the bridge for future adjustment.

This is way easier to do, than to explain. Trust me, once you have this figured out, everything about this issue will become clear all at once

Before you take any mechanical action, on any guitar, read, absorb, and understand the material included in this guide: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html

And yes, I do mean all eight pages of it!

The truss rod adjustment specs are well covered in the guide I've linked. A correct truss rod adjustment seems to be something the factory does very well. In the 7 guitars I've bought recently, only one ever needed a truss rod adjustment, and only a quarter of a turn at that.

BTW, that was my Fender. I mean absolutely nothing with that statement, no hidden agenda. Just making conversation.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 11, 2013,
#26
Yeah I just watched some videos on youtube that explain what you were telling me. It seems pretty simple.
#28
Thank you Captaincranky!!!! I've had this Fender for years and just assumed that there was nothing that I could do to make it better. With your help it is so much better!!! Now granted, it isn't perfect but it is a hell of a lot better than it was. Especially considering I didn't have anything to measure the string heights and I just eyeballed it. I adjusted the truss rod quite a bit, I would say probably 3/4 to 1 full turn. Then I sanded the saddle down to lower the string heights and man it is so much better! No fret buzz and the action is much lower.

I do have a couple of questions though. When I was adjusting the saddle, I would sand some, put the strings back on, get the guitar tuned up and check the action. I repeated this probably 5 or 6 times before I got it where I wanted it. Is this bad for the guitar or is it ok to do this. I am asking in case I try to do this to a nicer guitar one day.

Again, thank you so much! I almost have no reason to buy a new acoustic now other than just because I want one.
#29
OK first, you're quite welcome.

You can't hurt your guitar by tuning up and down several times when setting the action. In fact, that's the way I do it. Approach the project with caution, and don't try to get the action as low as possible. It's not an electric guitar, and you do need good string tension to properly actuate the sound board. Acoustic rhythm work generally has a lot of dynamics, that would cause buzzing under heavy strumming with the strings too low.

Tuning up and down several times will trash the string set though, they just go dead from cycling between slack and full tension. I usually get the guitar setup as well as I can, then make a final tweak on the last cycle, and replace the strings when I'm ready to tune up and leave it tuned up.

I think you mentioned your Fended is an AE model. If that's so, you need to be careful to keep the bottom of the saddle square to the sides and the long axis dead straight, so that correct contact with the peizo transducer is maintained. So sand off a bit less of a saddle than you think you need to, and save the last for truing it up.

I would have been more conservative with the truss rod adjustment, but I'm not there to see what you're dealing with. All I can say is, be mindful of the fact that even with a dual action truss rod, it may take a few days for the neck to fully catch up with the adjustment, and settle into it's final shape. Just keep your eye on it, and make sure the relief doesn't go away, or the neck doesn't start to get high in the center.

If you happen to be in a town where there's a "Harbor Freight & Salvage ", you can pick up a decent set of feeler gauges for 3 bucks or so, which will help a great deal in any future project.

Read that guide a few more times. Mr. Becker has packed a lot of nuance and subtleties into it that I'm sure would be of benefit to you.

If you can find one of these spark plug gauges: The high side is 1/10" (.100) and the thickest part of the rim is about 1/8"(.125) so a sloppy fit under the E-6 @ the 12th fret will put you right in the ball park. It takes a bit of practice, eyeballing, and making sure you have it parallel with the fret board to get the best results.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 12, 2013,
#30
I would have been more conservative with the truss rod adjustment, but I'm not there to see what you're dealing with. All I can say is, be mindful of the fact that even with a dual action truss rod, it may take a few days for the neck to fully catch up with, and settle into it's final shape


So are you saying that in a few days I might have to readjust my truss rod? The guitar was in pretty bad shape and I went a little at a time but like I said I didn't have gauges. I will be buying some though. Also, I just have a regular DG-7, not an AE model so no electronics to worry about.
#31
Quote by slash0102
So are you saying that in a few days I might have to readjust my truss rod?
Yes it's possible, just keep your eye on it.
Quote by slash0102
Also, I just have a regular DG-7, not an AE model so no electronics to worry about.
That shouldn't preclude you from trying to get it perfect. The guitar will sustain better if the saddle is in proper contact with the bridge, and your next one might be an AE. That means you'll know how to do it properly by the time you get there.