#1
Hi,

I have always anchored with my pinky and made the decision couple of weeks a go to ditch this technique but I am struggling like hell, it feels completely unnatural to me and I feel like I've lost most of my picking control, just wondering how long did it take you guys to move from anchoring to floating hand? I know this is subjective and based on how much you play and how easily you can adapt but I'm wondering about how long to give it before just admitting to myself anchoring works better for me. I actually feel more tense non-anchoring, the main reason I made a choice to stop doing it.

Cheers,
Ross
#2
It took me about a month, but I made an effort to play every day for at least a couple of hours to make the transition. I also haven't been playing for very long either.

I was in the same boat as you and I wrote a thread like yours and I am glad I made the switch. You have to give it time because you are using new muscles, learning coordination, and your playing is going to suck for awhile, but in the long run, your picking has more room for growth with non-anchoring. Or, at least that is what I am finding out for me.
#3
Hi,

why would you want to do that if you "feel more tense non-anchoring"?


Anyways, it took me about a month when I first started going to classical guitar classes.
Talking about that, try practicing some classical guitar fingerpicking technique, it really helps with stopping anchoring, since proper classical technique doesn't allow touching any of the strings for support.
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Aw yeah.
#4
I am doing the same right now, but I am less tense now. The only thing I have to improve a bit is my accuracy. I looked at Paul Gilberts picking technique and that seems to work for me.

Anyway, still enough work to do, but I think within a couple of weeks I'll get there.
#5
If you haven't learned good right hand muting technique yet, make sure you do this as you are re-learning to pick without anchoring. Otherwise you'll have to do it all over again once you discover you have unwanted string noise from the bottom strings. The side of your hand will help as a reference point for all the other strings too, which makes it an easier learning process.
#6
Quote by Thamoomin81
Hi,

I have always anchored with my pinky and made the decision couple of weeks a go to ditch this technique but I am struggling like hell, it feels completely unnatural to me and I feel like I've lost most of my picking control, just wondering how long did it take you guys to move from anchoring to floating hand? I know this is subjective and based on how much you play and how easily you can adapt but I'm wondering about how long to give it before just admitting to myself anchoring works better for me. I actually feel more tense non-anchoring, the main reason I made a choice to stop doing it.

Cheers,
Ross


If you're actively avoiding contact with the guitar your technique will suffer. Just take your old technique and don't press into the guitar. That's all you need to do.

If you were relying too much on fixing your hand on the guitar then you've basically never learned how to deal with momentum and relaxation and you're just going to have to learn how that works and it's gonna suck for a while.

If you decide to go back to anchoring just try and focus on keeping contact with the guitar feather light. It also gets tricky when you have lots of string skipping going on but you can adjust your technique then instead of now and it won't be much harder.
#7
Quote by Freepower
If you're actively avoiding contact with the guitar your technique will suffer. Just take your old technique and don't press into the guitar. That's all you need to do.

If you were relying too much on fixing your hand on the guitar then you've basically never learned how to deal with momentum and relaxation and you're just going to have to learn how that works and it's gonna suck for a while.

If you decide to go back to anchoring just try and focus on keeping contact with the guitar feather light. It also gets tricky when you have lots of string skipping going on but you can adjust your technique then instead of now and it won't be much harder.


You are right, I think I am trying too hard to avoid too much contact, I've gone the total opposite of anchoring, my hand was too far away, I needed somewhere inbetween without actually anchoring on the guitar, I think I'm slowly getting there, I have managed to stop myself automatically anchoring when playing solo's etc.

Thanks for the replies.