#1
EDITED (TYPO)
So I know a fair amount of theory and I wanted to get into some jazz. The book I picked up brushed over some of the nitty gritty of the basics I have learned.

When they went over consonant and dissonant intervals I was confused to find that one enharmonic equivalent could be viewed as consonant (e.g. a minor third) and another dissonant (e.g. an augmented major second).

Why is this? They don't say much on the topic. Is it due to context of the key? They both produce the same pitch.

When looking a musical staff, is there a correct term to use when choosing from the enharmonic equivalents? I was doing some of the exercises and ended up getting different answers using enharmonic equivalents.
Last edited by RockAddict311 at May 12, 2013,
#2
Quote by RockAddict311
So I know a fair amount of theory and I wanted to get into some jazz. The book I picked up brushed over some of the nitty gritty of the basics I have learned.

When they went over consonant and dissonant intervals I was confused to find that one enharmonic equivalent could be viewed as consonant (e.g. a major third) and another dissonant (e.g. an augmented major second).

Why is this? They don't say much on the topic. Is it due to context of the key? They both produce the same pitch.

When looking a musical staff, is there a correct term to use when choosing from the enharmonic equivalents? I was doing some of the exercises and ended up getting different answers using enharmonic equivalents.


Yes. An augmented second is equivalent to a minor third, not major, by the way. Probably just a typo.
#3
...I've never known this to be relevant or useful to jazz. Learn what really matters: harmonic functions and developing your listening skills to clearly hear what's going on.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#4
An augmented major second is a minor third. Not a major third. And yes, disonance consonance, and anything in between all depends on how you resolve it and what chords are playing under it anyways. If you have a chord that includes a dissonant interval as one of it's key components ( like a third or a fifth of the chord) Then It will sound consonant, but if it clashes with the chord, then it will sound dissonant. Let me explain consonance and dissonance just to make some things clear. Consonance means that it doesn't clash with the underlying chord. Dissonance, the exact opposite of consonance, a clash between the chords and the melody being played. Just in case it needed explaining.
#5
well in classical music an augmented 2nd interval is considered "bad" if i rememebr correctly
like in the Harmonic minor between the 6th and raised 7th degree which is why they made the melodic minor


this may or may not help you here
#6
Quote by Xiaoxi
...I've never known this to be relevant or useful to jazz. Learn what really matters: harmonic functions and developing your listening skills to clearly hear what's going on.


dont forget modes and scales

those are the key to everything

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#7
Quote by Xiaoxi
...I've never known this to be relevant or useful to jazz. Learn what really matters: harmonic functions and developing your listening skills to clearly hear what's going on.


Understanding intervals isn't necessary to understanding harmonic functions? That's new to me.
#8
Quote by RockAddict311

When they went over consonant and dissonant intervals I was confused to find that one enharmonic equivalent could be viewed as consonant (e.g. a major third) and another dissonant (e.g. an augmented major second).


Umm... Are you sure you got that right? The augmented second is equivalent to the minor third, not the major third.
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#9
Yah, the third was a typo. I already know a decent amount on scales and modes. Im just back tracking to the building blocks and the nitty gritty. I figured out what I was doing wrong. When doing the staff exercises I didnt take into account the quantity of the interval before the quality.
#10
The interval itself isn't dissonant, it's how it's used in a chord. The augment 2nd only appears as a #9 on dominant chords. It's referred to as a 9th because there is already a 3rd in the chord, and that third is a half step away from the #9.

C7#9, for example: C E G Bb D#

E is the 3rd of the chord, and D# is the #9.
#11
everything is context in music, the same as it is in any other language.

Buy yourself a book called "the jazz theory handbook". Start at the start and make sure you understand each new concept intimately.
You will keep referring back to it as long as you play music. Its a goldmine of information.