#2
Because

1. It looks cool
2. Nostalgia sells
3. Not all 70s Fenders we're bad. I have a 76 P-bass and aside from being worn from age it is an amazing instrument.

Style wise the 70s Fenders are my favourite.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#3
Quote by Bigbazz
Because

1. It looks cool
2. Nostalgia sells
3. Not all 70s Fenders we're bad. I have a 76 P-bass and aside from being worn from age it is an amazing instrument.

Style wise the 70s Fenders are my favourite.

Alright, fair enough. But I was merely wondering why they would even make a 70's reissue when there are the more legendary reissues of 50's and 60's guitars. That would be like Fender reissuing silverface amps alongside their 65 reissue amps wouldn't it?
#4
Because you can sell an Eskimo ice if you brand it properly.

Seriously, there's maybe about five people in the world who could pass a blindfold test to tell the difference between a modern and vintage guitar, so unless you're making music for those five people it doesn't really matter a fig-nueton what year your guitar was designed. It's all just branding, they reissue 70s guitars for people who like 70s music and assosiate alot of positivity with that decade. Dito the 50s, 60s, whenever. That positive connotation is the difference you (think that you) hear. Or a negative one if that's you're state of mind.
#5
Quote by EqualOfHeaven
Because you can sell an Eskimo ice if you brand it properly.

Seriously, there's maybe about five people in the world who could pass a blindfold test to tell the difference between a modern and vintage guitar, so unless you're making music for those five people it doesn't really matter a fig-nueton what year your guitar was designed. It's all just branding, they reissue 70s guitars for people who like 70s music and assosiate alot of positivity with that decade. Dito the 50s, 60s, whenever. That positive connotation is the difference you (think that you) hear. Or a negative one if that's you're state of mind.



You just said tone doesn't matter and isn't noticeable...

Those people can't tell the difference because they don't know what the vintage guitar sounded like when it was new.
FACT: guitars change with age
^^^^^^

So those re-issues don't sound the same as the original but they can sound really close by either altering the electronics. Then again, those vintage guitars and their re-issues should be made from the materials and specs so... I'm kind of arguing against myself.
#6
Quote by EqualOfHeaven
Because you can sell an Eskimo ice if you brand it properly.

Seriously, there's maybe about five people in the world who could pass a blindfold test to tell the difference between a modern and vintage guitar, so unless you're making music for those five people it doesn't really matter a fig-nueton what year your guitar was designed. It's all just branding, they reissue 70s guitars for people who like 70s music and assosiate alot of positivity with that decade. Dito the 50s, 60s, whenever. That positive connotation is the difference you (think that you) hear. Or a negative one if that's you're state of mind.


this exactly this. i disagree about the whole not being able to tell the difference part but the reasoning of why they do it is correct.

perfect example: i've been pining for the road worn 50's model fender strat... why? clapton, no other reason, clapton. we all associate different things with different memories. i associate a sunburst strat with listening to clapton driving down the road with my dad.

when i see a les paul slung low or a tophat i automatically think of slash.
#7
Alright I'm not sure if people are understanding my question. I was merely conjecturing as to why Fender would release a 70's reissue guitar that is more expensive than the 50's and 60's reissue guitars when everyone knows 70's Fender were far inferior to 50's or 60's era Fenders. I get why they release reissues, everyone wants the "vintage" look and sound without the vintage price, but why would anyone want to pay more for a less desirable vintage reissue model over the more desirable ones which cost less?
#8
The headstock is probably why, I know that I, for one love the large 70's headstock.

But other than that? who knows. Cause people will buy it.
It's NEVER Lupus
My Gear:
2010 Fender Highway One strat
2010 Epi Les Paul Standard
2005 Squier p bass
2007 Yamaha F310
2011 Epiphone Korina Firebird
2013 Hudson Telecaster
Kustom Quad 200 (4x12)
Fender frontman 212r
#9
Quote by Bigbazz
Because

2. Nostalgia sells
+1

Because most people that are old enough can afford the reissues and remember those times "as the good 'ole days." The reissue is a tangible piece of their past that they can hold in their hand.
Last edited by David Stein at May 11, 2013,
#10
Quote by DrewMeyer
Alright I'm not sure if people are understanding my question. I was merely conjecturing as to why Fender would release a 70's reissue guitar that is more expensive than the 50's and 60's reissue guitars when everyone knows 70's Fender were far inferior to 50's or 60's era Fenders. I get why they release reissues, everyone wants the "vintage" look and sound without the vintage price, but why would anyone want to pay more for a less desirable vintage reissue model over the more desirable ones which cost less?

Simple. 1) Branding. 2) They can take what worked and keep it, trash what didn't work (without sacrificing the look). 3) People like the look of it.
#11
Quote by DrewMeyer
Alright I'm not sure if people are understanding my question. I was merely conjecturing as to why Fender would release a 70's reissue guitar that is more expensive than the 50's and 60's reissue guitars when everyone knows 70's Fender were far inferior to 50's or 60's era Fenders. I get why they release reissues, everyone wants the "vintage" look and sound without the vintage price, but why would anyone want to pay more for a less desirable vintage reissue model over the more desirable ones which cost less?


They sell them at prices based on production costs and how much they think people will buy them for. Get those figures from Fender if you want your answer to that question.

Secondly your assumption that 'EVERYONE' knows that Fender made better guitars in the 50's and 60's is just stupid. Show me evidence of that? Stop being a snob and get a grip. Although some know that lot's probably don't. As has been said before people relate guitar era's to musical era's. So if you like 70's music you'll probably buy the 70's re-issue.
#12
50's early 60's ... hell ya , I would rather have a guitar that Leo built himself (Leo Fender that is, HE is the Man ) .... after 65 , ho hum
Last edited by Fumble fingers at May 12, 2013,
#13
marketing and thats it .... Fender was at it's pinacle of low quality during the 70's , so it has to be a marketing deal like mentioned earlier about people re-living there youth but with more money this time , I'm sure a 70's re-issue is better quality than an actual 70's model
#14
Quote by Fumble fingers
marketing and thats it .... Fender was at it's pinacle of low quality during the 70's , so it has to be a marketing deal like mentioned earlier about people re-living there youth but with more money this time , I'm sure a 70's re-issue is better quality than an actual 70's model


To be honest I'd be surprised if a 50s or 60s reissue wasn't better quality than an original, atleast if were talking MIA/Custom Shop. Guitar build quality is way less hit and miss these days.
Cornford Hellcat
Peavey 5150
1994 Ibanez Jem 7V
#16
Its not like there were not good ideas in Lutherie in the 1970s. The reissues give the companies a chance to release products that live up to the full potential of the stuff they came up with back then, just with actual quality control.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#17
Quote by Bigbazz
To be honest I'd be surprised if a 50s or 60s reissue wasn't better quality than an original, atleast if were talking MIA/Custom Shop. Guitar build quality is way less hit and miss these days.



quite possible , specially in the pick ups , being hand wound in those days it varied quite a bit from guitar to guitar, sound would be different between guitar and guitar by a bunch , paint and finish would be better today for sure , but in the early days they were pretty much hand made by George and Leo , Fender in the early days was a company formed by necessity , Leo was a radio and amplifier guy , but musicians needed louder instruments for bigger auditorium , in a quest for better pick-ups Leo made a slab wood guitar as a test bed to try different pick ups for more sound , next thing you know is the musicians loved the sound so well that they were wanting to borrow that slab guitar to record albums then give it back after recording , didn't take Leo long to figure out he needed to make/sell guitars and the rest is history
Last edited by Fumble fingers at May 12, 2013,
#18
It's kind of like all old things. Most people assume everything that's more than 30 years old is 1. collectable, 2. better quality than newer stuff.

Obviously you're not going to pull a fast one on a forum of knowledgeable guitar players, but if you were to put an ad in Craigslist or tell your friends you have a 70's Strat, chances are they're going to be more impressed with that than an Eric Johnson strat.

I've been privileged to witness someone asking about a straight trade between their Fender 70's Standard Strat for a brand new Ibanez (the one with the lime green textured paint). Only to find out their Strat was more on the undesirable side of collectables and would be worth about 1/3 the price of the new Ibanez IF it were in good condition with a case matching the time period.
Major of 7 String Legion 7 > 6

Carvin DC747
Ibanez RG2228
Schecter Avenger Custom Shop
and my baby....
Gibson Explorer Studio
#19
Most people assume everything that's more than 30 years old is 1. collectable, 2. better quality than newer stuff.


I certainly am!
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!