#1
I am a new guitar player and am wondering if anyone would have some simple scales to look at or simple songs I can look up. Anything would help.
#2
Try learning the major scale and pentatonic scale in 1 position.
Easy songs.

Simple songs
Boston - More Than a feeling
AC DC - Long way to the top if you want to rock n roll
Deep purple - Space Trucking
Beatles - Day Tripper
Judas Priest - Breaking the law
#3
Learn the note names on your fretboard while learning the scales.
We're all alright!
#4
Please remember to play with a metronome. Start at about 60 BPM and play a note of the C major scale along with the beat. Use alternate picking as well (up down up down) because that will help you out a ton. After playing the scale 4 times in a row without getting off beat or messing up the scale, go up five beats. That would mean after you play the scale four times at 60BPM go up to 65BPM and so on. Once you get to 160BPM go back down to 80BPM and start working on eighth notes, which basically means you add a note between a beat. So every beat, you'll play two different notes of the scale. And once again, one you get to 160BPM go back to 80BPM and do sixteenth notes, which is four notes for every beat. I can't stress how important it is to learn how to play with a metronome because it's the one of the few ways you'll ever stay in time while playing a song and if you plan to go professional and record, you need to be able to play with a metronome.
#5
Quote by cjms1997
Please remember to play with a metronome. Start at about 60 BPM and play a note of the C major scale along with the beat. Use alternate picking as well (up down up down) because that will help you out a ton. After playing the scale 4 times in a row without getting off beat or messing up the scale, go up five beats. That would mean after you play the scale four times at 60BPM go up to 65BPM and so on. Once you get to 160BPM go back down to 80BPM and start working on eighth notes, which basically means you add a note between a beat. So every beat, you'll play two different notes of the scale. And once again, one you get to 160BPM go back to 80BPM and do sixteenth notes, which is four notes for every beat. I can't stress how important it is to learn how to play with a metronome because it's the one of the few ways you'll ever stay in time while playing a song and if you plan to go professional and record, you need to be able to play with a metronome.


This guy is right. Metronomes improve your speed, rhythm, and technique SO much. I'd learn a few scales, particularly the pentatonic and the major scale, like that other guy said. Technique is very important to a beginner, because some habits are quite difficult to break.

Some easy songs to play are as follows

Smells Like Teen Spirit
Walk (No solo)
Black Sabbath
Enter Sandman
Highway to Hell
More Than a Feeling
Iron Man
Smoke on the Water

Some of the first things you should learn how to do are power chords. They're extremely common, to the point where bands like Nirvana and Green Day use them almost exclusively. Learn how to do those well, and there are actually a lot of options open to you as far as learning riffs goes.

Solos will take a bit more time to learn at first, I'd get the hang of the pentatonic scale, the techniques known as legato, alternate picking, and string bending. A few easy solos

Smells Like Teen Spirit
Bohemian Rhapsody
Back in Black
Paranoid
Wish You Were Here
Fade to Black intro (There is one pretty hard part though)
One intro
Californication

Make sure you know how to care for your instrument correctly, try not to let dust build up, polish it, change the strings every couple of weeks to a month, no sudden changes to temperature, get a case and don't carry it around out of the house out of case, etc.

ALWAYS, ALWAYS make sure your guitar is in tune. This is extremely important. Guitars in standard tuning are (from thickest string to thinnest) E-A-D-G-B-E. To tune your guitar, just do this.

1. Assume your thickest string is in tune
2. Hold down the fifth fret of the thickest string, and play the next one. If it's in tune, the second string with no fret held down should sound the same as the first string with the fifth fret held down
3. Tune the third string the same way, just hold down the fifth fret on the second string, and get it to sound the same by adjusting the tuning pegs.
4. Repeat to get your fourth string in tune
5. Now things change up a little. Hold down the FOURTH fret of the fourth string to tune the fifth.
6. Lastly, hold down the fifth fret again and tune the thinnest string to it, and you're in tune!


I hope I helped!
#6
Any beginning guitar player can progress just fine without the technical theory , memorizing scales , playing in specific time signatures etc. Instead spend all your devotion becoming familiar with the chords of any vocal oriented songs you're already familiar with hearing. It's not even significant to imitate the songs exactly as their recordings, Instead play them freely while singing or humming and liberate yourself experimenting with the harmony and rhythm. Also obtain the lead sheet music for any melody you can find , simply plucking the melodies of any songs will teach you more about being musical with different tones than studying any scales will. Learn songs that you can enjoy singing relaxed in a natural tone , after a few times screaming or grinding to the usual boy band songs you will burn them out and neglect the more significant aspects of music you should be focusing on .
For now try and be selective with your repertoire by learning songs you hear other acoustic songsters singing also . Their genre of music is more likely to be suitable for a beginning guitarist because the music generally has a more traditional influence with a solid structure of harmony and rhythm that's more gratifying for any musician without a full blown band plugged in with special studio affects an such .
.After you become familiar with the chord functions and melodies of a dozen or so vocal oriented songs any musical skills you aspire will be advanced upon in a more progressive fashion than would otherwise be obtainable .
So take what you can out of all this, even if you have no intention being a singer of any sorts or even if your no good singing its irrelevant . For all that matters is this is the best approach for any musician to spend their time when starting out until their able to take more control in the greater scheme of things .
Last edited by TheJasbo at May 15, 2013,
#7
Thanks for all the advice guys. Will have to look up the songs. Am trying to do overlong right now. Can do a few pieces of it.
#8
Quote by TheJasbo
Any beginning guitar player can progress just fine without the technical theory , memorizing scales , playing in specific time signatures etc. Instead spend all your devotion becoming familiar with the chords of any vocal oriented songs you're already familiar with hearing. It's not even significant to imitate the songs exactly as their recordings, Instead play them freely while singing or humming and liberate yourself experimenting with the harmony and rhythm. Also obtain the lead sheet music for any melody you can find , simply plucking the melodies of any songs will teach you more about being musical with different tones than studying any scales will. Learn songs that you can enjoy singing relaxed in a natural tone , after a few times screaming or grinding to the usual boy band songs you will burn them out and neglect the more significant aspects of music you should be focusing on .
For now try and be selective with your repertoire by learning songs you hear other acoustic songsters singing also . Their genre of music is more likely to be suitable for a beginning guitarist because the music generally has a more traditional influence with a solid structure of harmony and rhythm that's more gratifying for any musician without a full blown band plugged in with special studio affects an such .
.After you become familiar with the chord functions and melodies of a dozen or so vocal oriented songs any musical skills you aspire will be advanced upon in a more progressive fashion than would otherwise be obtainable .
So take what you can out of all this, even if you have no intention being a singer of any sorts or even if your no good singing its irrelevant . For all that matters is this is the best approach for any musician to spend their time when starting out until their able to take more control in the greater scheme of things .

This.

I would just learn to play the songs I enjoy listening to. Or at least parts of them (for example if you can't play the solo yet).

Though sometimes it's good to be able to play the song just the way it sounds on the record - for example figuring out the rhythm just like it's on the record. It will improve your listening skills. But remember that tab books are usually pretty inaccurate when it comes to playing things exactly like they are on the record. I have seen so many mistakes in tab books - they are usually pretty bad and not accurate at all. (For example a "Little Wing" tab. That's just terribly wrong. I was lazy and wanted to learn that song fast. But then I listened to the record and what I had learned sounded nothing like the original. The licks were pretty much wrong.) Maybe try transcribing your own tabs.

Remember to use your ears!! Music is about sound so try to think about how everything sounds like. Also listen to your own sound. Does what you play sound good or do you just think it sounds good while it really sounds awful?

When you are a beginner, I think just starting to play technical exercises and scales up and down doesn't really motivate you - it feels too technical. Start playing them when you really want to improve your technique. But first have some fun. Focus on learning the basic chords and stuff because they are what you need in every song. Then start playing your favorite songs. You want to play music, not just technical exercises.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
I aortic do this already. I can do bits of songs. I know a few basic cords. Am wanting to eventually push to the next level and am wondering should I work on scales or something else.
#10
Smells like teen Spirit is probably the best introduction into electric guitar a beginner could get. All Apologies by Nirvana is also very simple. Being a huge Nirvana fan helps when starting to play guitar
#11
Another really easy song is Wake me up When September ends By Green Day
#12
Quote by jhigh
I aortic do this already. I can do bits of songs. I know a few basic cords. Am wanting to eventually push to the next level and am wondering should I work on scales or something else.

Can you play barre chords? How well? If you have trouble with barre chords, then get those down first, I'd say.
#13
Like A chord type of Barr. I am not really doing that. Am still very New. Am thinking of taking lessons once I learn a lol more.
Last edited by jhigh at May 19, 2013,
#14
I'm talking about chords like:

 
e-5-5-
B-5-7-
G-6-7-
D-7-7-
A-7-5-
E-5---

which are Amajor and Dmajor respectively. Can you barre the 5th fret to play those chords? You should be able to barre any chord really.
#15
Quote by jhigh
I aortic do this already. I can do bits of songs. I know a few basic cords. Am wanting to eventually push to the next level and am wondering should I work on scales or something else.


If a musician only knows a few basic chords then "pushing to the next level" would only require devotion to the array of first position chords for any variety of vocal oriented songs they may aspire; thereby armoring the musician with the essentials for progressing with the dynamics of "Functional Harmony" eventually being able to capture any sound you want by ear . Also armor yourself with the ability of reading or at least deciphering the basic melody line of standard music notation, this provides an indispensable asset for any musician to take advantage within a multitude of various applications .
Being devout to these fundamental practices the rate of progress and skills developed would virtually only end up being a consequence of the style of music you aspire .
Last edited by TheJasbo at May 20, 2013,
#16
Ha so take it slow. It actually has been a few days since I played . If there are three things I should focus on before what should I focus on out of everything. Am close to just paying for lessons.
#17
Anyway thanks for all the tips. A lot of good things to look up.
#18
Am getting more into it. Know e minor Panasonic and major Panasonic along with around twenty cords. fingers hurt alot now. So focus on barring next focus on playing songs? Also any advice about being in a band?
Last edited by jhigh at Jun 11, 2013,
#20
Quote by jhigh
Am getting more into it. Know e minor Panasonic and major Panasonic along with around twenty cords. fingers hurt alot now. So focus on barring next focus on playing songs? Also any advice about being in a band?

I think you mean pentatonic, not Panasonic.

If your fingers hurt, maybe take a break if it's making playing the guitar painful.

But yeah, play songs and at the same time learn some technique. You can learn new chords and techniques by playing songs. Always play music, not just technical exercises because guitar is about playing music.

Playing in a band is always fun. You could start jamming with your friends. Playing in a band will improve your sense of rhythm and I think it will also make you listen to your and other people's playing more.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#21
Ha yeah my spell check messed me up. Thanks both of you I will google it.