#1
Not only for those of you who would consider themselves passed the beginner stage of playing the guitar, but for those who would say they're currently at the beginner stage. What did/do you do and what information can you give us on how you train yourself. How did you get better and why was it effective for you? Did you learn to read music at the start? Did you just look at tutorials on youtube or back in the day just listen to a song by ear and try to learn the progressions.

Example: I am playing everyday for extended periods of time when I get the chance... when im off work. I usually tend to listen to some songs that i want to try to learn then look up online some tutorials for the song and look at different ones and find the best for me. At the start I learned some easy tunes like Brohym, Smoke on the water, Highway to hell, Dirty Deeds, Ironman, then i learned some easy stuff on my acoustic like Sittin on the dock of the bay, Stand by me, Wagon Wheel, Swing Life Away etc. so i could try to learn different chords. after I got a little more comfortable i started trying to play some tunes with hammer ons/off, and bending like Layla, Lifes Been Good, Life in the fast lane(which i still haven't got) and just stuff like that, i don't wanna name off everything. I learned some basic pentetonic scales that i try to play around with and create solos (shitty ones non the less, but im trying to learn). I guess what im getting to is what are some other ways besides imitating a tutorial on youtube to learn how to naturaly play and not mimic. I feel sometimes held back or down because i havent learned how to play naturally. How can I get more comfortable with my fretboard, and how can I get more comfortable and confident at picking and alternate picking.

Sorry for the long read, anyone who is willing to help out I would greatly appreciate it.

My set up for those of you wanting to know: Epiphone Les Paul Special II, Boss DS-1, Line 6 Spider II on factory settings. (medium picks if anyone cares to know)
#2
Play that baby all night long.

No but seriously, just play and have fun playing. If you don't play for a few days, it doesn't matter. As long as you have fun WHEN you're playing, you'll learn it the right way. That's what music is for, right? The entertainer should be entertained himself too.
#3
Practice & learn songs
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#4
i did evrything
one summer i basically had no frinds around cause they all went on tripsso i played guiar like evryday all day

i read books to explain the sounds i was making learnt songs
i got a bit of the repetitive strain injury so i also worked on making my technique as healthy as possible

but most importantly i enjoyed playing and making music
when i wouldnt feel it i would stop take a break play video games or something and then get back to it
#5
Quote by supersac
i did evrything
one summer i basically had no frinds around cause they all went on tripsso i played guiar like evryday all day

i read books to explain the sounds i was making learnt songs
i got a bit of the repetitive strain injury so i also worked on making my technique as healthy as possible

but most importantly i enjoyed playing and making music
when i wouldnt feel it i would stop take a break play video games or something and then get back to it


Thanks for the feed back. What were some of the books you read if you can remember? I listened to a few of your songs on your youtube channel, do you play any electric or do you only play acoustic ?
#6
Just play. I used chromatic 1234 on all the strings for a week or so until my fingers got tougher. Try really simple songs in your favorite genre to get used to playing in a musical context.
#7
Played. For many many many hours. I've spent my fair share of time running exercises and such as well but if I'm anything it's just because I've put in so many hours and been careful about how I do it.
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#8
I would get shitloads of tabs on my computer and play songs which were relatively easy for me. Probably it's not the best way of learning how to play, but I don't give a ****, I know how to play now and there's plenty of time for me to get better.
#9
Get out of your room and play with other people, no matter what your skill level is. It will help way more than woodshedding for 5 years in your room. Play along to some records that you like, this will train your ear. And, probably most importantly of all, be patient. You won't be Steve Vai in a month (usually)..it's takes countless hours and dedication, but the work that you put into it will pay off if you keep at it.
Good luck!
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#10
^ Oh so true, jamming with others is very valuable in a multitude of ways.

My tip is to just learn to practice correctly. Meaning don't spend your entire time noodling; learn all the keys, practice scales, work on technique, theory, etc.
#11
I played what i liked. But at the 1,5 year mark i had to really sit down and get down proper fingering and picking technique, cause i was hurting myself. To give you a picture, my picking hand was like marty friedmans, but even more bent.

But that's one of the things that can happen when your self taught. But luckily i taught myself to play in a completely new way, which took time of course, but i'd say i found my ideal technique now, just have to build it up.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#13
Quote by Hardlycore
^ I love the way Marty picks. :P


I'm not saying it's bad for him, cause he has played that way forever. But for me starting out and being the usual beginner (not focusing on relaxation, and such) his technique is really not ideal. And even if i played relaxed i don't think marty's technique is something you should try to emulate. It works for him.

Love marty as a player though, his style is great. The way i pick nowdays is more in a paul gilbert fashion, using a closed fist where i can use my fingers to hybridpick if needed.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#14
Quote by Sickz
I'm not saying it's bad for him, cause he has played that way forever. But for me starting out and being the usual beginner (not focusing on relaxation, and such) his technique is really not ideal. And even if i played relaxed i don't think marty's technique is something you should try to emulate. It works for him.


I only meant that it looks cool. I agree, I don't recommend it for anyone else, but it works for him.
#17
ahhh thanks everyone. woke up today with some good feedback that i can put into use. no work today! jamm outtt
#18
When i was a beginner i would practice anything i enjoy.. Whether it be my favourite songs or improvising or composing my own music. I still do exactly that. I just practice what i enjoy.
#19
Keep making up your own solos as you play along with records you love. It will help you find your own voice, and help you figure out how to "say" what you want with your instrument.

If you learn a new lick from a record, analyze it, and figure out what you like about it. Then you can use the bits you like in your own solos.

Lather, Rinse, Repeat.
Last edited by amakely at May 18, 2013,
#20
Yes it's really good to practice with stuff you like because you will enjoy the music you're playing (even if you play it slow or not perfect). You will have to play a lot to get good. A lot of typically suggested beginner songs, you might not like at all and if that happens find something you enjoy.

Instead of 1234 chromatic exercises that sound terrible I'd play that "opening a treasure chest" from zelda and it somehow becomes fun

You can also do practices while casually watching TV - many don't think of that, or even try to play along with the background music which will improve your ear as well. Spend a lot of time with the guitar.
#21
Quote by fanapathy


You can also do practices while casually watching TV


That's playing, not practicing..
baab
#22
^I get what you're saying in that there's a difference between more focused intense practice and something like that, it won't be as effective/dedicated but it will help.
#23
I got a teacher. It seemed to help a lot haha.
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