#1
So basically here's my story as far as playing bass is concerned. I've always loved bass lines, not really been much for a bass guitar though, mostly synthesized bass lines. I decided to start learning guitar, and 3 months later bought my first bass. It was cheap but it did the job.

My musical tastes have never been stuck to one solid genre, My experience of music from an early age started with pop-punk influence from my older brother, your general chart music that you couldn't help but hear being a kid, and Some old rock I can't even name the genre of from my dad, classic rock maybe, lord knows(maybe a bit of ska too). Being a rather lazy induvidual I decided to stick to pop-punk, i found it easy to learn and it kept me busy. I broke out of pop-punk learning some alternative-rock songs and some mainstream punk(billy talent and rise against mainly, I go through phases where I over listen to bands). I've been playing bass about 5 months now, and I've gotten bored of what I'm learning, I'm even making my own stuff now trying to be adventurous.

I want to write more and more original stuff, but my musical knowledge, and musical taste isn't very broad so I was hoping you guys could educate me on some Bass pioneers of certain genre's the techniques I could take from these songs/bassists to put into my own work.
P.S I'm a fast learner so nothing should be too difficult for me to learn how to do given the right amount of determination.
#2
Flea and Les Claypool are two good starting points. After that, you've just gotta find music you like and bass lines that inspire you, study them, and take it from there.

Flea plays bass for Red Hot Chili Peppers. Generally plays a slap bass style but songs like "Throw Away Your Television" have great bass lines you can play without slapping.

Les plays in Primus, and is pretty experimental. "John The Fisherman" is a good spot to start there.
#4
Rage Against The Machine and Audioslave are a brilliant place to start. Simple basslines with groove and humility, the key attributes (in my opinion) of a great bass guitarist.
#5
I did learn a few Rhcp songs, although I never really learnt slap bass( I don't have a proper amp and it sounds kind of weird through what I use), i tended to stick to finger plucking or using a pick. I've never heard of primus(please don't kill me for this). I will try learn some from that list. I did try learning a few rage against the machine songs, Bombtrack i think it was, but at the time i wasn't too good at listening and figuring out a song by ear. And whoever their record label is has gone round sites making sure tabs of their music is removed, because that's totally normal and all.
#6
Along with RATM, look at muse. some of the best modern bass playing IMO.
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#7
Quote by tmtheturtle
I did learn a few Rhcp songs, although I never really learnt slap bass( I don't have a proper amp and it sounds kind of weird through what I use), i tended to stick to finger plucking or using a pick. I've never heard of primus(please don't kill me for this). I will try learn some from that list. I did try learning a few rage against the machine songs, Bombtrack i think it was, but at the time i wasn't too good at listening and figuring out a song by ear. And whoever their record label is has gone round sites making sure tabs of their music is removed, because that's totally normal and all.

I have some RATM stuff in tab or sheet music form that I can send over by PM. You have every right to learn their stuff and read their tabs but Ultimate Guitar has no right to make money off them (the adverts).
#8
I guess that makes sense, I'd be really grateful if you could do that, Tab would be best, while I can read sheet music I'm not too familiar with the fretboard so learning from that is slow.

And muse were some of the first alternative-rock songs I learned, it's taken me a few months but i can finally play hysteria with my fingers I used to play it at the songs speed with just down strokes with a pick but it left me a bit exhausted.
#9
Quote by tmtheturtle
I guess that makes sense, I'd be really grateful if you could do that, Tab would be best, while I can read sheet music I'm not too familiar with the fretboard so learning from that is slow.

And muse were some of the first alternative-rock songs I learned, it's taken me a few months but i can finally play hysteria with my fingers I used to play it at the songs speed with just down strokes with a pick but it left me a bit exhausted.

If you're willing to learn to read sheet music, the only way is to do so on a regular basis, so you'll learn how to read. therefore, i recommend you to learn whatever piece you wanna learn with sheet music. just my 2 cents
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#10
I started on Flea and saw the results years later. However, it's not too good to stick to one influential player, you gatta look for and decide to like a bunch of influential players and really try to get in their head of what theyre playing why theyre playing it, and if you can wrap your head around those things, HOW they play it will come with practice time and patience blah blah blah. Talk is cheap.

The fact that you've gotten bored of one style of playing is a good thing. The fact that youre actually composing music of your own that might correlate to that style (or not) is an even better thing. Imagine when you have more viewpoints and styles under your belt in the near future, your originals will outshine the very bands and people you envy to do the things that they do so "easily". You know now how hard it is, you'll know then how easy it is.
#12
Listen to everything you can. Turn on the radio when your driving, trawl through youtube when you get home drunk and listen to everything. Go out to the clubs and bars and listen to the bands/artists playing. Im listenin to weather reports heavy weather album. I just re bought the record so i could frame one cover as its been such an influential album for me.

Snarky Puppy, Esperenza Spalding's radio music society, iron and wine's ghost on ghost, al di meola's land of the midnight sun, bill evans live at the village vanguard, justin timberlake's 20/20 ( i personally think this is a great album with some great arrangements) and mick karn's sensitive are just a couple of albums ive had spinning over the last few days if thats an use.

As far as becoming a better player, apart from exposing yourself to different genre's, get some lessons of a couple of different teachers around your area in both playing and theory. Get hold of some sheet music in any clef (but try for bass at the moment and then move into tenor, alto and treble) and battle your way through it. 15-20 mins a day for a year and you can become a great reader. Mess about with chord progressions. Load some chords on your computer and jam over them with a hundred different ideas. And really just just keep picking up the bass and playing it.

EDIT: just realized this is a bit of a ramble but if you can wade your way through it hopefully there's some good points in there.

EDIT 2: in terms of players, i think i began with people like Phil Lynott, tim commerford, flea, ben kenny. Ive slowly moved through pino palladino, tal wilkenfield, stuart zender, christian mcbride, Jaco(of course), scott la faro, john goldsby, rufus reid, esperenza spalding, anthony jackson (a personal hero), bernard edwards etc etc. If you want some names to google and check out what they play on.
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Last edited by fatgoogle at May 17, 2013,