#1
So i've always had more hum and buzzing from one guitar (jackson dkmg - passive HBs if it makes a diff) than my other guitar, and i think it might have to do with the conductive paint in the control cavity.

I've tried to take multiple multimeter readings from various areas on the conductive paint surface, and only in very very few locations will i get any reading.
I know all the grounding wires are properly hooked up, and there is a ground wire that is screwed into the conductive paint.
I've been told that if metal isn't grounded then it acts as an antenna, and creates more buzzing and hum.

could this be the case with this guitar? that the conductive paint isn't being properly grounded?

can i paint directly over the conductive paint with another layer? or do i need to strip out the original conductive paint first?

thanks for the help
#2
Your wiring should all be grounded through the sleeve of your jack. The conductive paint is there to shield your wiring from interference, not to act as a ground.

Edit: You can paint straight over the top with conductive paint, or stick-on shielding is an option.

If the guitar wasn't grounded properly at all, you'd get an ungodly amount of hum. Do you get it all of the time or just whilst playing? Also, does it get worse when you have loads of electrical equipment on in the room (PC, TV, whatever)?

Also, what's you quieter guitar and what are you playing through?
#3
Could just be the pickups, some are particularly sensitive to noise. For example, the Seymour Duncan TB4 and SH2N I used to have in my RR3 we're pretty good at picking up background interference from electrical devices.
#4
Quote by -MintSauce-
Your wiring should all be grounded through the sleeve of your jack.


got that one covered

Quote by -MintSauce-
The conductive paint is there to shield your wiring from interference, not to act as a ground.


the conductive paint DOESN'T get connected to ground? the way the guitar was wired originally, there was a ground wire screwed into the conductive paint (at least i THINK its conductive paint. its black, and it does conduct at very few points)

Quote by -MintSauce-
Edit: You can paint straight over the top with conductive paint, or stick-on shielding is an option.


I have copper tape, but it doesn't adhere to the paint

Quote by -MintSauce-
If the guitar wasn't grounded properly at all, you'd get an ungodly amount of hum. Do you get it all of the time or just whilst playing? Also, does it get worse when you have loads of electrical equipment on in the room (PC, TV, whatever)?


I did notice that the hum is much worse when my laptop is on, and ESPECIALLY worse when a youtube video is playing. hum gets worse when i touch my metal desk lamp

Quote by -MintSauce-
Also, what's you quieter guitar and what are you playing through?


other guitar is an LTD with JB/59

I kind of suspect that the noisy guitar might be a little noisier because i made hybrid HBs. the bridge is a JB/Demon, the neck is a Seth/Jazz (they sound awesome btw). so i would imagine that mis-matched coils might not cancel hum as well as matched coils.

I play through a POD HD with headphones
Last edited by sethp at May 15, 2013,
#5
Quote by sethp
the conductive paint DOESN'T get connected to ground? the way the guitar was wired originally, there was a ground wire screwed into the conductive paint (at least i THINK its conductive paint. its black, and it does conduct at very few points)

I did notice that the hum is much worse when my laptop is on, and ESPECIALLY worse when a youtube video is playing. hum gets worse when i touch my metal desk lamp

other guitar is an LTD with JB/59

I kind of suspect that the noisy guitar might be a little noisier because i made hybrid HBs. the bridge is a JB/Demon, the neck is a Seth/Jazz (they sound awesome btw). so i would imagine that mis-matched coils might not cancel hum as well as matched coils.

I play through a POD HD with headphones


Is the wire actually connected to the paint, or does it just feed through a hole to the bridge?

I get a lot of interference from the fans in my PC and 50Hz hum from the mains if I use guitars with hot passives in... and a lot of gain. I still get the hum with my EMG and Blackout guitars, but not quite as badly.

Your mismatched coils could be the root of the problem, but I'm not really clued up on that
#6
Quote by -MintSauce-
Is the wire actually connected to the paint, or does it just feed through a hole to the bridge?

I get a lot of interference from the fans in my PC and 50Hz hum from the mains if I use guitars with hot passives in... and a lot of gain. I still get the hum with my EMG and Blackout guitars, but not quite as badly.

Your mismatched coils could be the root of the problem, but I'm not really clued up on that


thanks for your help minty

there is a hole from the electronics cavity to the trem claw which a ground wire goes through

then there are ground wires screwed into the wood in the electronics cavity (the pickup cavities have these too), that presumably connects the conductive paint to ground

maybe they sprayed poly finish over the conductive paint in the finishing process? and that's why i cant get a meter reading?

edit: another odd phenomenon, hum gets much MUCH worse when i put my hand (or presumably any other body part) near the hot wire that goes from the switch to the output. should the hot wire from the switch to the tone knob be shielded and grounded?
Last edited by sethp at May 15, 2013,