#1
assuming you can site read, whether you really can or not. would you feel odd about it?

flipping through sheet music pages that sit on a music stand as you play, and you would be sitting.

this would be for a cover band playing all night and you use sheet music most of the time. it's a paid gig that pays well, if that helps.

lots of people in the audience would be there.

I'm just curious. thanks.
#2
Quote by dog_style
assuming you can site read, whether you really can or not. would you feel odd about it?

flipping through sheet music pages that sit on a music stand as you play, and you would be sitting.

this would be for a cover band playing all night and you use sheet music most of the time. it's a paid gig that pays well, if that helps.

lots of people in the audience would be there.

I'm just curious. thanks.


well sight reading and reading music are not the same thing...sight reading is very specific as reading music for the very first time...and in a cover band at a gig i wouldnt dare sight read..can bet someone's gonna f**k it up!

Now if you mean just general reading of music I dont see a problem if its been rehearsed, but looking at the music does take away from stage presence so its a hit there.
#3
Unless you're really good at sight reading, I wouldn't even attempt it.

Now if you're considering cheat sheets with the chords and lyrics as a crutch, I think that could be a big help.'
'
Don't use it when you don't need it. Maybe a read through between sets, like that.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 15, 2013,
#4
it's more of a self conciouncious question. would you feel less than doing this on stage for a cover band gig? and everyone is sitting. not just you.
#6
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
Paid gig? if ya screw up...ya wont be invited back!


i wonder how common that happens with site readers.

some cover bands might need a emergency sit in player.
#7
This whole affair sounds like speculation/ getting ahead of yourself/ fantasizing but FWIW, session players have to practice sight reading and be spot on in real time when asked to do it.
#8
Orchestral players use sheet music every time they play. Of course, they're playing very long and complex pieces, but even so, they've usually practiced enough that the sheet music in question is more of a reminder...a safety net...than an actual requirement.

If you're capable of reading music and you're coordinated enough to flip the pages- or have an extra-big music stand, or have some kind of app on a tablet, etc.- there shouldn't be an issue.
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It is very impotent to success a business.
#9
I've been playing for many years, and although I play a lot of the same songs every day, I still can't remember any of them well enough to play them without my notes... so I have a music stand in front of me every time I play. The notes consist of lyrics with the appropriate chords written just above them. Also, for what it's worth, I've never played sitting in my life... I just can't do it... the position is super awkward for me, so I always stand.

Now to answer your question, since I have occasionally been invited to play at parties, picnics, etc., my feeling is that since I never see any other guitar players using a music stand I wouldn't feel comfortable doing it. On the other hand, I've seen a few people using them at our annual folk festival, and would probably feel OK with doing it there.

I have to mention that playing is only a hobby for me... I'm somewhat inconsistent from day to day, and I tend to stop dead when I make a mistake... and besides that, my vocal range is rather limited... so I'm not really very well-suited to giving performances... and the need for a music stand is just one more obstacle.
Last edited by Prescott_Player at May 17, 2013,
#10
Depends.... Classical musicians have the sheet music in front of them... Seen as normal. Jazz guys often have lead sheets and such...

However... Typically guys like me... Single performers doing singer-songwriter-"roots" type music... Don't
Sort of expected that you have the stuff down...

I agreed pretty much with this years ago... Thought that having a bunch of notes and sheet music was "unprofessional". Distracting....
However, now at 66... I have the very devil of a time remembering words. So... An unobtrusive lyric sheet (or iPad....) that you can just glance at when necessary...

I've become more forgiving.
#11
Quote by Captaincranky
This whole affair sounds like speculation/ getting ahead of yourself/ fantasizing but FWIW, session players have to practice sight reading and be spot on in real time when asked to do it.

many musicians are often dreamers.
#12
Quote by Prescott_Player
I've been playing for many years, and although I play a lot of the same songs every day, I still can't remember any of them well enough to play them without my notes... so I have a music stand in front of me every time I play. The notes consist of lyrics with the appropriate chords written just above them. Also, for what it's worth, I've never played sitting in my life... I just can't do it... the position is super awkward for me, so I always stand.

Now to answer your question, since I have occasionally been invited to play at parties, picnics, etc., my feeling is that since I never see any other guitar players using a music stand I wouldn't feel comfortable doing it. On the other hand, I've seen a few people using them at our annual folk festival, and would probably feel OK with doing it there.

I have to mention that playing is only a hobby for me... I'm somewhat inconsistent from day to day, and I tend to stop dead when I make a mistake... and besides that, my vocal range is rather limited... so I'm not really very well-suited to giving performances... and the need for a music stand is just one more obstacle.


thanks.
#13
Quote by Bikewer
Depends.... Classical musicians have the sheet music in front of them... Seen as normal. Jazz guys often have lead sheets and such...

However... Typically guys like me... Single performers doing singer-songwriter-"roots" type music... Don't
Sort of expected that you have the stuff down...

I agreed pretty much with this years ago... Thought that having a bunch of notes and sheet music was "unprofessional". Distracting....
However, now at 66... I have the very devil of a time remembering words. So... An unobtrusive lyric sheet (or iPad....) that you can just glance at when necessary...

I've become more forgiving.


maybe if the guy wore a suit it would be more accepted.
#14
i've never seen a cover band or rock band use sheet music, and have very rarely seen a singer use lyric sheets. most of the cover bands i've seen have the singer and at least one guitar player moving around the stage, sometimes both guitarists (if there are 2) and the bass player. having to check sheet music would mean more stuff on stage to get in the way and also probably keeping the players in 1 place, as well as keeping the players from having eye contact with the audience, all of which would mean less of a feel of excitement.

the people using the sheet music would have to be REALLY good at not only sight reading but at finding their place - otherwise there could be breaks in timing or errors.

when i was playing in a cover band, we practiced all the songs together till we knew them, and practiced them alone and learned new songs to practice together on non-rehearsal days. every cover band i tried out for required new band members to know tons of songs people like to hear played in bars.

i have seen people use sheet music / lyrics at open mics and amateur shows, but again, if you have to find your place in a song, scanning paper while playing it isn't going to be good for timing or performance.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
Last edited by patticake at May 17, 2013,
#15
i never seen it in a cover band either. but then again i haven't seen many acoustic rock cover bands at the same time.
i would wonder if it's maybe more acceptable if it's unplugged vs. electric.
#16
i've seen a bunch of acoustic cover bands - never seen any good ones use sheet music. that doesn't mean one couldn't.

have you ever noticed how orchestras and classical combos work with sheet music? they know the piece they're playing well enough with regard to the music that they all turn their pages simultaneously. they also know their sheet music for each piece well enough that it makes it easier to find a spot if you forget something. that being said, except for specialty numbers, i haven't seen an orchestra that bothers with audience eye contact - it's a different situation.

to me, the same things would apply - whether you're all acoustic or not, sitting in one place staring at sheet music or lyrics isn't going to add excitement or a feeling of connection with the audience, and that connection with the audience tends to make an audience much more enthusiastic about a band.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
Last edited by patticake at May 18, 2013,
#18
because we have no investment in the subject?

besides, i've seen much more frivolous threads
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#19
Quote by patticake
because we have no investment in the subject?
Perhaps. But, perhaps some threads don't invoke personal investment. Yeah, that's the old "chicken or the egg" argument.

Quote by patticake
besides, i've seen much more frivolous threads
OK, so maybe this doesn't "peg the needle " on your "frivolometer", but mine is cruising somewhere between 8 and 9......
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 19, 2013,
#20
really?

i ask because to me this doesn't seem that frivolous. it sounds like dog_style is considering joining a band/project and he's concerned about this issue. i can understand it. it sounds to me like the band isn't ready to play live as they don't know their songs, and he's tempted because it's a gig, and because it's a paying gig, but is concerned.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#21
Quote by patticake
really?

i ask because to me this doesn't seem that frivolous. it sounds like dog_style is considering joining a band/project and he's concerned about this issue. i can understand it. it sounds to me like the band isn't ready to play live as they don't know their songs, and he's tempted because it's a gig, and because it's a paying gig, but is concerned.
Well, that's the read I got as well, although perhaps even a step before that, "jumping the gun", if you will. I think it's a bit frivolous because what we think really doesn't matter.

I suppose we could admonish him to "learn the songs inside before you try to perform in front of an audience".

But would that matter if there is a finite time until the gig? Probably not. If the gig isn't booked yet, a different story.

If he has to sit because the others are planning on it. Then take the good old human nature's way out and and publish a disclaimer, "they made me sit, I wanted to stand".

Intuitively, I think musicians would be more forgiving about it anyway, knowing the difficulties involved. I don't think a pop audience would be as forgiving. Then too, it depends on the material. If it's dance music, the audience might expect you to get up and dance with them. Or at minimum, stand up. I thought even in old time jazz orchestras, everybody sat until it was their turn to solo, then they had to stand.

If it's a full blown rock gig, then you might be expected to do your guitar solo stoned, on top of a PA speaker bank.

It's really a lot easier to sort out than all that. If you sit down and use sheet music, it's a recital. If you stand up and wing it, it's a concert.

If our TS is that torn and confused about this, I don't have too much optimism about the outcome anyway.

Here's a case in point, this seated rendering of Joni Mitchell's, "Big Yellow Taxi". (no sheet music though). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FcLWF756uQs I find it well done and entertaining, but somewhat wooden, in keeping with the reasons I've outlined thus far. Low practice time presentation can yield mixed results. Tell me what you think about it.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 20, 2013,
#22
Quote by Captaincranky
Why do what seem to be the most frivolous threads, always seem to gain the most traction?


well you might wanna ask yourself that, because you opened it up and replied and will be back to reply to this reply.

it's also something you won't get into because you don't play out and haven't. at least not yet. this was directed towards acoustic players who play out, maybe ones who do it for pay, etc. and do covers.

#23
Quote by patticake
i've seen a bunch of acoustic cover bands - never seen any good ones use sheet music. that doesn't mean one couldn't.

have you ever noticed how orchestras and classical combos work with sheet music? they know the piece they're playing well enough with regard to the music that they all turn their pages simultaneously. they also know their sheet music for each piece well enough that it makes it easier to find a spot if you forget something. that being said, except for specialty numbers, i haven't seen an orchestra that bothers with audience eye contact - it's a different situation.

to me, the same things would apply - whether you're all acoustic or not, sitting in one place staring at sheet music or lyrics isn't going to add excitement or a feeling of connection with the audience, and that connection with the audience tends to make an audience much more enthusiastic about a band.


maybe it depends on the gig. whether it's a bar, casino, coffee shop, amphitheater event, cruise ship, busking, book store, etc. and what kind of crowd it draws.
#24
Personally, I use sheet music when I do gigs.

I use it because I can't, for the life of me, memorize music (yet, anyway). I have accepted this shortcoming and I'm ok with it. It makes me feel a bit self conscious, but, it would be much worse if I didn't have the music out at all.

Thus far, my audiences have been forgiving. I admit my shortcoming to them and I make jokes about it.
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#25
Quote by ajhayes
Personally, I use sheet music when I do gigs.

I use it because I can't, for the life of me, memorize music (yet, anyway). I have accepted this shortcoming and I'm ok with it. It makes me feel a bit self conscious, but, it would be much worse if I didn't have the music out at all.

Thus far, my audiences have been forgiving. I admit my shortcoming to them and I make jokes about it.


it sounds like you might have a case of dyslexia, there's different forms of it that some musicians have had or have. there are special self treatments people use to help with that. Wikipedia probably has more info in case you're interested.
#26
I use chord sheets all the time in church and out in bars and parties and have never had a problem, a buddy of mine has played out for 30 years he uses them as well it is not possible to remember ALL of the chords and music to every song you want to play. It also gives you the ability to play a lot more songs.
#27
Quote by dog_style
it sounds like you might have a case of dyslexia, there's different forms of it that some musicians have had or have. there are special self treatments people use to help with that. Wikipedia probably has more info in case you're interested.


Thanks for the heads up!
Epiphone EJ 200 CE
Oscar Schmidt 12 String
Magnatone Zephyr
Several harmonicas
Kenucky Mandolin
Crestwood Resonator
Dean Playmate Acoustic Bass
Jasmine By Takamine S35
#28
Lots of people use cheat sheets, normally flat on the floor behind the monitors. It is a lot more professional to have the sheets on the floor that to forget the lyrics. I'm horrible about mixing up the verses. And have been known to draw a blank after introducing the song, "how's that go again?" is usually good for a laugh from the audience but you wouldn't want to use it more than once a night. I've seen folk bands use charts and I've seen singers hold lyric sheets when guesting with other bands. Rock... not so much.
#30
a cheat sheet down by your pedals or on your amp is common to remind you of the chords/lyrics for a few songs...or song structure. I'd never go beyond that though for a paid gig. Give some stage presence, look like a pro, and practice! Also, if you have trouble playing through mistakes then you may want to get more comfortable in front of people...that's a huge part of playing live and even pros say wrong lyrics or start something in the wrong key but fix it asap.
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