#1
I love Blues, jazz, ragtime and origin american music as a whole. When i "discovered" all this stuff, i got catapulted to a whole new world of music and got an understanding on the history and personalities of american music in the time between 1910-1960. I've mostly been playing and listening to all types of music from this period over the last 2 years and gotten to the point of love. Anyway, im a somewhat stoned writing this so bare with me.

Sometimes when i play, improvise, and play along to records, i can play. I can play something good for several bars, and actually knock out something i would call an alright solo. I can "hear" or sense the next notes and lines coming up in my head, in real time, it's a fast process, and it's a wonderful process. Also, just listening to music without a guitar, i can start to sing (if im alone) lines and solos for several bars, like im speaking the language, and it rides the progressions. Not lyrics but just the notes.
This happens.. Sometimes, few times. Added: In these times i also don't consciously think about intervals, note names, or key scale degree's at all.

All too often im trying to improvise and play something, often also without records or backing tracks, and i hear nothing. I can hear starting points or one line, and then it completely dies. I can't find a pocket, i cant hear the right notes in my head and i end up (first unconsciously) playing muscle memorized licks. Which really sounds like shit.
At times likes these i do one out of three things:
1. Sometimes i put the guitar away, because i think i cant "feel" it right now, and it would be better not to play at all.
2. I push through, I put on some of my favorite records, and force myself to get in on it, which works 50 percent of the time.
3. I tend to think of theory, i analyze my lines and think about why it works and why it doesnt work. I can hear tiny good sequences, and then it stops right away at a wrong note and i analyze it, and take the theory approach in general. Like i start thinking, in a G blues, why does bending the C sound good over the IV chord, since it's the C7's Tonic.

Anyway, i'm still stoned and this has taken me forever to get down, and i guess in the end i really dont have much of a well formulated question. But i want to know what i can do to really hear it and feel it, more often then every fifth or fourth time i play.
I've been playing guitar for 2 and a half years.
Last edited by Ignore at May 16, 2013,
#2
It's magic, and you are the conjurer. You just have to keep practicing and it will happen more often. How many times did it happen in the first month after you started playing compared to now?
Si
#3
even less i guess, maybe just a note sometimes, or two. and when i managed to hit them at the right time they sounded perfect to me. I guess ive gotten so used to playing those kind of short things instinctively that i dont even think about it anymore, and im concentrating about what i cant do, and that i cant make up longer lines on the spot without failing.
#5
Quote by macashmack
Get a good woman. Solves all of mans problems.


Waiting for the perfect man.

I mean woman.
Just another Sheep in the design of the Almighty Machine.


-GEAR-
Gibson 60s Les Paul Tribute (Sunburst)
1999 Ibanez RG470 (TitaniumIce-MIJ)
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Podx3
#6
Quote by macashmack
Get a good woman. Solves all of mans problems.

Just don't kick her out when she giggles chinese phrasing at your pentatonic playing...

The solution to that, btw, is to use something called modes.
#7
Quote by mdc
Just don't kick her out when she giggles chinese phrasing at your pentatonic playing...

The solution to that, btw, is to use something called modes.

stop right there, mister.
How about... Try playing more linear lines?
Linear =/= Modal.
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
#8
linear lines isn't such a bad idea. but i wouldn't forget harmonic playing as a method entirely. Sometimes a good rhythmic harmonic idea can be exploited and made for very musical playing.
#9
Quote by macashmack
Get a good woman. Solves all of mans problems.


What are you, like 17 years old?
1978 Les Paul Custom Sunburst
2001 USA Strat (Hot & Cool Rails)
Effects: Boss GT-6 with Tech-21 Power Amp
#11
Smoke more? haha

But keep practicing and improvising and it'll get easier and better in time. Only playing for a little over 2 years in all honesty isn't that long at all, and if you're already diving into your theory and improvising some it only goes up from there. You're on a good track, think of all the progress you'll make in 4 or 10 years of playing! It all takes time.
#12
Quote by Ignore
could you go more in depth on that erc?


Well, a linear line is mostly a melodic idea that follows the phrase model. I would just google the 'phrase model' and you can get a good idea about how it works. It's a melodic idea with direction; a melodic idea thats complete in itself with motivic development and repetition. A harmonic rhythmic idea is a motivic idea that serves a both a harmonic and rhythmic function. It's kind of hard to explain but just imagine something like a timpani being played for a funeral marsch and you get an idea about what a harmonic rhythmic idea is. I just like to recommend that everybody reads 'The Fundamentals of Musical Composistion' by Arnold Schoenberg. It teaches everything that you need to know about music and its developmental ideas (and all composition ideas can be transferred into improvisational ideas.)
#13
Quote by mdc
Just don't kick her out when she giggles chinese phrasing at your pentatonic playing...

The solution to that, btw, is to use something called modes.



Quote by MissingSomethin
What are you, like 17 years old?

I'd rather a good woman then go 20 years without using minor chords.
Last edited by macashmack at May 19, 2013,
#14
Quote by macashmack
I'd rather a good woman then go 20 years without using minor chords.

+1